Photo

ANI082-00124

Logging has taken its toll on a former wintering roost for monarch butterflies near Angangueo, Mexico.

Photo

ANI082-00125

Logging has taken its toll on a former wintering roost for monarch butterflies near Angangueo, Mexico.

Photo

ANI082-00110

A pronghorn (Antilocapra americana) crossing under a fence near Medicine Hat, Alberta, Canada.

Photo

ANI082-00111

Millions of monarch butterflies (Danaus plexippus) roost on the Sierra Chincua (Chincua mountain) near Angangueo, Mexico. This is one of five wintering roosts for monarchs, where the cool mountain climate slows their metabolism enough for them to overwinter before migrating back northward in the spring. Logging threatens this spectacle: already one of the five sites is no longer used by the butterflies due to the forest being cleared.

Photo

ANI082-00112

Millions of monarch butterflies (Danaus plexippus) roost on the Sierra Chincua (Chincua mountain) near Angangueo, Mexico. This is one of five wintering roosts for monarchs, where the cool mountain climate slows their metabolism enough for them to overwinter before migrating back northward in the spring. Logging threatens this spectacle: already one of the five sites is no longer used by the butterflies due to the forest being cleared.

Photo

ANI082-00113

Millions of monarch butterflies (Danaus plexippus) roost on the Sierra Chincua (Chincua mountain) near Angangueo, Mexico. This is one of five wintering roosts for monarchs, where the cool mountain climate slows their metabolism enough for them to overwinter before migrating back northward in the spring. Logging threatens this spectacle: already one of the five sites is no longer used by the butterflies due to the forest being cleared.

Photo

ANI082-00114

Monarchs (Danaus plexippus) in the Sierra Chincua sanctuary, Mexico.

Photo

ANI082-00115

Millions of monarch butterflies (Danaus plexippus) roost on the Sierra Chincua (Chincua mountain) near Angangueo, Mexico. This is one of five wintering roosts for monarchs, where the cool mountain climate slows their metabolism enough for them to overwinter before migrating back northward in the spring. Logging threatens this spectacle: already one of the five sites is no longer used by the butterflies due to the forest being cleared.

Photo

ANI082-00116

Millions of monarch butterflies (Danaus plexippus) roost on the Sierra Chincua (Chincua mountain) near Angangueo, Mexico. This is one of five wintering roosts for monarchs, where the cool mountain climate slows their metabolism enough for them to overwinter before migrating back northward in the spring. Logging threatens this spectacle: already one of the five sites is no longer used by the butterflies due to the forest being cleared.

Photo

ANI082-00117

Millions of monarch butterflies (Danaus plexippus) roost on the Sierra Chincua (Chincua mountain) near Angangueo, Mexico. This is one of five wintering roosts for monarchs, where the cool mountain climate slows their metabolism enough for them to overwinter before migrating back northward in the spring. Logging threatens this spectacle: already one of the five sites is no longer used by the butterflies due to the forest being cleared.

Photo

ANI082-00118

Millions of monarch butterflies (Danaus plexippus) roost on the Sierra Chincua (Chincua mountain) near Angangueo, Mexico. This is one of five wintering roosts for monarchs, where the cool mountain climate slows their metabolism enough for them to overwinter before migrating back northward in the spring. Logging threatens this spectacle: already one of the five sites is no longer used by the butterflies due to the forest being cleared.

Photo

ANI082-00119

Millions of monarch butterflies (Danaus plexippus) roost on the Sierra Chincua (Chincua mountain) near Angangueo, Mexico. This is one of five wintering roosts for monarchs, where the cool mountain climate slows their metabolism enough for them to overwinter before migrating back northward in the spring. Logging threatens this spectacle: already one of the five sites is no longer used by the butterflies due to the forest being cleared.

Photo

ANI082-00120

Millions of monarch butterflies (Danaus plexippus) roost on the Sierra Chincua (Chincua mountain) near Angangueo, Mexico. This is one of five wintering roosts for monarchs, where the cool mountain climate slows their metabolism enough for them to overwinter before migrating back northward in the spring. Logging threatens this spectacle: already one of the five sites is no longer used by the butterflies due to the forest being cleared.

Photo

ANI082-00105

An ocelot (Leopardus pardalis) photographed with a camera trap in Laguna Atascosa National Wildlife Refuge in Texas.

Photo

ANI082-00089

Hungry Horse Dam, one of the biggest dams that blocks bull trout movements in Northern Montana. Note that biologists say this dam actually prevents non-native fish from moving upstream here, which today is a good thing. No fish ladder or passages were incorporated into this or any other dam in this region at the time they were built.

Photo

ANI082-00106

A bobcat (Lynx rufus) traverses along the Mexican-Texas border. A border wall along the lower Rio Grande in Texas divides nations as well as habitats, hindering daily essential movements of animals in the area. Bobcats would normally cross the border to find mates or catch dinner. The wall also blocks the dailly rounds of ocelots, another member of the cat family. Photograph by Joel Sartore with Mitch Sternberg, Jennifer Lowry, and Naghma Malik, all U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

Photo

ANI082-00090

A bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) in Bighorn Creek which is part of the Kootenay river system in British Columbia, Canada. (IUCN: Vulnerable; US: Federally threatened)

Photo

ANI082-00092

A bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) in Bighorn Creek which is part of the Kootenay river system in British Columbia, Canada. (IUCN: Vulnerable; US: Federally threatened)

Photo

ANI082-00093

Bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) swimming in the Bighorn Creek, in the Wigwam River drainage in British Columbia. This is one of the last, best places for spawning of the vulnerable (ICUN) and federally-threatened bull trout, and is part of the Kootenay River system, which sees an annual migration of bull trout from Lake Koocanusa, some fifty miles away. The fish prefer very cold water of 40 degrees or so in order to spawn, and the springs in this area provide that.

Photo

ANI082-00094

A group of fisherman cleaning lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush) at Lake Pend Oreille, Idaho.

Photo

ANI082-00095

A group of fisherman cleaning lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush) at Lake Pend Oreille, Idaho.

Photo

ANI082-00096

Bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) caught in fishing nets in Lake Pend Oreille, Idaho. (IUCN: Vulnerable; US: Federally threatened)

Photo

ANI082-00097

A lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush) caught in a net by fishermen in Lake Pend Oreille, Idaho.

Photo

ANI082-00099

Biologists collect samples from a vulnerable (IUCN) and federally threatened bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) Clark Fork River, Idaho.

Photo

ANI082-00100

The Thompson Falls dam, which is currently starting construction to build a fish passage system on the Clark Fork river in Thompson Falls, Montana. Shown is the road way being constructed on the downstream side that will be used to transport heavy machinery.

Photo

ANI082-00101

A fisheries technician for dam owner Avista, uses a radio antenna to track tagged bull trout in a stream that feeds into Noxon Reservoir. Biologists track a handful of tagged fish daily to try and learn about their migratory movements, which a series of dams on the nearby Clark Fork River have severely impeded.

Photo

ANI082-00102

A fisheries technician for Avista, checks a monitoring station for radio-tagged bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) at the base of Noxon Rapids Dam, Montana. (US: Federally threatened; IUCN: Vulnerable)

Photo

ANI082-00103

An aerial of the Bowden natural gas drilling area along the MIlk river northeast of Malta, Montana.

Photo

ANI082-00104

Aerial of the Bowdoin natural gas drilling area northeast of Malta, Montana.

Photo

ANI082-00071

Cliff swallows (Petrochelidon pyrrhonota) flying into their mud nests under a county bridge near Raymond, Nebraska.

Photo

ANI082-00088

One turbine’s deadly harvest: biologists calculate that on average, 32 bats and five birds are killed in one season by each turbine on this wind farm in southwest Pennsylvania. Big birds aren’t immune, as this red-tailed hawk (Buteo jamaicensis) shows.

Photo

ANI082-00072

An interior least tern (Sterna antillarum), a federally endangered species, on its nest at the Western Sand and Gravel mine along the Platte River near Fremont, NE. Many mine companies are pausing work during the nesting season in areas this bird and other rare species use.

Photo

ANI082-00073

Cliff swallows (Petrochelidon pyrrhonota) flying into their mud nests under a county bridge near Raymond, Nebraska.

Photo

ANI082-00074

A young man watching mountain goats (Oreamnos americanus) in Glacier National Park, Montana.

Photo

ANI082-00075

A train crosses over a bridge in the Walton area of Glacier National Park, Montana.

Photo: Julie Jensen Director of Marketing | WVC O: 866.800.7326 | D: 702.443.9249 | E: j.jensen@wvc.org

Speaking Engagements

Joel is a popular keynote speaker with conservation, corporate, and civic groups.

Hire him to entertain and inspire your audience.

Book Joel To Speak

The Photo Ark

Joel is the founder of the Photo Ark, a groundbreaking effort to document every species in captivity before it’s too late.

Explore the Photo Ark

Visit Our Store

Every purchase goes directly to support our mission: getting the public to care and helping to save species from extinction.

Help Us Build the Ark