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Cliff swallows (Petrochelidon pyrrhonota) flying into their mud nests under a county bridge near Raymond, Nebraska.

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One turbine’s deadly harvest: biologists calculate that on average, 32 bats and five birds are killed in one season by each turbine on this wind farm in southwest Pennsylvania. Big birds aren’t immune, as this red-tailed hawk (Buteo jamaicensis) shows.

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An interior least tern (Sterna antillarum), a federally endangered species, on its nest at the Western Sand and Gravel mine along the Platte River near Fremont, NE. Many mine companies are pausing work during the nesting season in areas this bird and other rare species use.

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Cliff swallows (Petrochelidon pyrrhonota) flying into their mud nests under a county bridge near Raymond, Nebraska.

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A young man watching mountain goats (Oreamnos americanus) in Glacier National Park, Montana.

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A train crosses over a bridge in the Walton area of Glacier National Park, Montana.

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A mountain goat (Oreamnos americanus) walks along a mountain in Glacier National Park, Montana.

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A mother mountain goat (Oreamnos americanus) and her baby walk along a rocky path in Glacier National Park, Montana.

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A mother mountain goat (Oreamnos americanus) and her baby rest on a rocky ledge in Glacier National Park, Montana.

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A mountain goat (Oreamnos americanus) in Glacier National Park, Montana.

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A mother mountain goat (Oreamnos americanus) and her baby on a rocky ledge in Glacier National Park, Montana.

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A mountain goat (Oreamnos americanus) in Glacier National Park, Montana.

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A mountain goat (Oreamnos americanus) in Glacier National Park, Montana.

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A female bobolink (Dolichonyx oryzivorus) is caught by biologists using a mist net, near Wood River, Nebraska. Avian ecologists trap and put tiny geolocators, which track sun intensity as well as sunrise and sunset, on male bobolinks. When the birds are recaptured (months from now) and the data is downloaded and used to calculate the birds’ migratory route. The species winters in South America, but little is known of its specific route.

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Red-headed woodpeckers (Melanerpes erythrocephalus) feed their young high in the forest canopy at Spring Creek Prairie near Denton, Nebraska.

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Biologists tag a male bobolink (Dolichonyx oryzivorus) in Nebraska. They will put tiny geolocators, which track sun intensity as well as sunrise and sunset, the birds’ backs. When the birds are recaptured (months from now) and the data is downloaded and used to calculate the birds’ migratory route. The species winters in South America, but little is known of its specific route.

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Red-headed woodpeckers (Melanerpes erythrocephalus) feed their young high in the forest canopy at Spring Creek Prairie near Denton, Nebraska.

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A grasshopper sparrow (Ammodramus savannarum) nest is well camouflaged in the thick prairie grasses along the Platte River near Wood River, Nebraska.

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A male bobolink (Dolichonyx oryzivorus) near Wood River, Nebraska.

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A biologist holds a male bobolink (Dolichonyx oryzivorus), captured for a study near Wood River, Nebraska. They will put tiny geolocators, which track sun intensity as well as sunrise and sunset, the birds’ backs. When the birds are recaptured (months from now) and the data is downloaded and used to calculate the birds’ migratory route. The species winters in South America, but little is known of its specific route.

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Mexican laborers build a border wall near Alamo, Texas.

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Mexican laborers constructing the border wall that separate the United States from Mexico near Alamo, Texas.

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Mexican laborers constructing the border wall that separate the United States from Mexico near Alamo, Texas.

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A road-killed bobcat (Lynx rufus) that has been placed along a highway near the Santa Anna NWR. USFWS biologists are conducting a study to determine how often passers will to pick up and take a dead bobcat, which often is just a few minutes. This may be skewing biologist’s road kill statistics.

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A USFWS wildlife biologist, runs a radio telemtery set for bobcat signals along the wall on the Lower Rio Grande NWR near Santa Maria. The wall bisects many of the tiny habitat tracts that remain along the border.

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A bobcat (Lynx rufus) photographed by a camera trap along the Texas-Mexico border in Texas. Cutting in many places through the last of the habitat left along the lower Rio Grande river, the wall is a huge impediment to the movement of wildlife species that can’t fly over it. Photograph by Joel Sartore with Mitch Sternberg, Jennifer Lowry, and Naghma Malik, all U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

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Mexican free-tailed bats (Tadarida brasiliensis) swirl out of the Eckert James River Bat Cave at sunset to feed on insects. This maternity colony builds to more than 6 million bats in late July, making it one of the largest in the world. It is owned and managed by The Nature Conservancy.

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Mexican free-tailed bats (Tadarida brasiliensis) swirl out of the Eckert James River Bat Cave at sunset to feed on insects. This maternity colony builds to more than 6 million bats in late July, making it one of the largest in the world. It is owned and managed by The Nature Conservancy.

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Aerials of the world’s largest wind farm near Abilene, TX. The farm spreads out over 47,000 acres in Nolan and Taylor Counties in Texas. There are more than 500 turbines in this development, which sprawls over farmland, pasture and mesquite and juniper scrub. Environmentalists are quite concerned that wind turbines are killing increasing numbers of migrating bats and birds.

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Aerials of the world’s largest wind farm near Abilene, TX. The farm spreads out over 47,000 acres in Nolan and Taylor Counties in Texas. There are more than 500 turbines in this development, which sprawls over farmland, pasture and mesquite and juniper scrub. Environmentalists are quite concerned that wind turbines are killing increasing numbers of migrating bats and birds.

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Aerials of the world’s largest wind farm near Abilene, TX. The farm spreads out over 47,000 acres in Nolan and Taylor Counties in Texas. There are more than 500 turbines in this development, which sprawls over farmland, pasture and mesquite and juniper scrub. Environmentalists are quite concerned that wind turbines are killing increasing numbers of migrating bats and birds.

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Army soldiers doing training exercises at Fort Hood in Killeen, Texas.

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Army soldiers doing training exercises at Fort Hood in Killeen, Texas.

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Army soldiers doing training exercises at Fort Hood in Killeen, Texas.

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Army soldiers doing training exercises at Fort Hood in Killeen, Texas.

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Army soldiers doing training exercises at Fort Hood in Killeen, Texas.

Photo: Julie Jensen Director of Marketing | WVC O: 866.800.7326 | D: 702.443.9249 | E: j.jensen@wvc.org

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