Photo

PEO002-00256

Twin farmers enjoy lunch at Mulligan’s Bar in Oxford, NE.

Photo

MIG003-00001

A mountain goat (Oreamnos americanus) stretches to reach a mineral lick in the Walton area of Glacier National Park in Montana. Wonder how this one performed such a death-defying feat? Very carefully. Mountain goats make their living by taking each step very seriously. Using splayed, rubbery hooves that grip rock surfaces, this female started by placing all four feet on the tiny ledge where her back feet are shown in the photo. She then pushed out and wedged into the crevice using her front hooves to bridge the gap, licking any salt on the rocks around her. To get out, she reversed the procedure, again placing all four feet on the same little ledge, turning around slowly until she could exit, uphill and to the left.

Photo

SCE054-00011

Giraffe can be found in great numbers again in Uganda’s Murchison Falls National Park, but perhaps not for long. The government has been approving oil drilling, which will introduce more roads and disrupt the animals in their already reduced and fragile habitat.

Photo

SCE054-00004

A late afternoon storm breaks over Uganda’s Lake Albert, a dramatic reminder of the region’s seasonal rain cycle.

Photo

SCE054-00006

In the crater lakes of the Rift, villagers alter the water flows to create patchy saltworks as one way to make a living.

Photo

SCE054-00001

An aerial of the Explosion Craters area in Queen Elizabeth National Park, Uganda.

Photo

SCE054-00002

Water buffalo and mineral deposits along the shore of a crater lake at the Explosion Craters of Queen Elizabeth National Park.

Photo

ANI019-00233

A vulnerable (IUCN) and federally-endangered clouded leopard (Neofelis nebulosa) at the Houston Zoo. The population trend of the clouded leopard is decreasing with less than 10,000 in the wild.

Photo

BIR003-00424

Thousands of sandhill cranes roost on the Platte River during their annual migratory stopover at the Rowe Audubon Sanctuary near Gibbon, NE. With water in the river fully appropriated for urban areas and agriculture, many wonder how long it will be until the river runs dry. Some 600,000 to 800,000 cranes use just a few miles of the river in central Nebraska–areas that have been been mechanically cleared of the woody vegetation that the birds can’t tolerate.

Photo

ANI079-00238

A leatherback sea turtle hatchling crawls toward the ocean.

Photo

ANI040-00139

Female black howler monkeys (Alouatta caraya) in the Pantanal, Brazil.

Photo

ANI020-00069

A horse stands by a barbed wire fence in the sunset light near Howes, South Dakota.

Photo

ANI032-00138

A Bison at the Fort Niobrara National Wildlife Refuge in Nebraska near Valentine, Nebraska.

Photo

PLA019-00020

A leaf of the critically endangered alectryon macrococcus plant.

Photo

ANI019-00229

Hasari, a vulnerable (IUCN) and federally endangered three-year-old cheetah (Acinonyx jubatus), at White Oak Conservation Center.

Photo

ANI053-00012

An adult and juvenile member of the Habinyanja family of gorillas, one of four semi-habituated families who will tolerate humans in their presence. This family group makes its home at the north end of Bwindi Impenetrable Forest National Park.

Photo

ANI053-00011

A member of the Mubara gorilla family reaches up through the branches in Bwindi Impenetrable National Park.

Photo

ANI018-00065

A group of elephants roams the plains of Queen Elizabeth National Park in Uganda.

Photo

PEO003-00400

A rancher’s dog expresses displeasure by snarling at photographer, Joel Sartore, on a ranch in Idaho.

Photo

ANI082-00174

A large herd of bison (Bison bison) running across the prairie on the Triple U Bison Ranch near Fort Pierre, South Dakota. This ranch has about 2,000 head of bison on over 50,000 acres.

Photo

ANI082-00116

Millions of monarch butterflies (Danaus plexippus) roost on the Sierra Chincua (Chincua mountain) near Angangueo, Mexico. This is one of five wintering roosts for monarchs, where the cool mountain climate slows their metabolism enough for them to overwinter before migrating back northward in the spring. Logging threatens this spectacle: already one of the five sites is no longer used by the butterflies due to the forest being cleared.

Photo

ANI082-00024

A western diamondback rattlesnake (Crotalus atrox) in the foothills of the Wichita Mountains in Oklahoma. Studies are showing that rattlesnakes that have the genetic tendency to migrate are being killed in ever-increasing numbers on our nation’s roads, leaving those snakes with non-migrating tendencies behind to breed.

Photo

ANI082-00008

Thousands of sandhill cranes (Grus canadensis) roost on the Platte River during their annual migratory stopover at the Rowe Audubon Sanctuary near Gibbon, NE. With water in the river fully appropriated for urban areas and agriculture, many wonder how long it will be until the river runs dry. Some 600,000 to 800,000 cranes use just a few miles of the river in central Nebraska–areas that have been been mechanically cleared of the woody vegetation that the birds can’t tolerate.

Photo

ANI082-00014

Thousands of sandhill cranes (Grus canadensis) roost on the Platte River, forming living sandbars, during their annual migratory stopover at the Rowe Audubon Sanctuary near Gibbon, NE. With water in the river fully appropriated for urban areas and agriculture, many wonder how long it will be until the river runs dry. Some 600,000 to 800,000 cranes use just a few miles of the river in central Nebraska–areas that have been been mechanically cleared of the woody vegetation that the birds can’t tolerate.

Photo

BIR008-00103

A critically endangered (IUCN) and federally endangered California condor (Gymnogyps californianus) at the Phoenix Zoo.

Photo

INS007-00069

Monarch butterflies (Danaus plexippus) from Sierra Chincua, Mexico.

Photo

SCE042-00134

A king penguin (Aptenodytes patagonicus) rookery from South Georgia Island’s St. Andrews Bay. Shown is one of the largest king penguin colonies in the world at 100,000 nesting pairs.

Photo

SCE042-00009

A gentoo penguin (Pygoscelis papua papua) colony on Danco Island, Antarctica.

Photo

ESA001-00037

Captive northern spotted owl (Strix occidentalis caurina) in a clearcut near Merlin, Oregon. Habitat loss and climate change are the two primary factors leading to the extinction of species. (US: Threatened)

Photo

ESA001-00023

An ocelot (Leopardus pardalis) at the San Diego Zoo, San Diego, California.

Photo

ANI064-00009

A captive, five-month-old mandrill (Mandrillus sphinx) in Malabo, Equatorial Guinea. IUCN: Vulnerable

Photo

ANI024-00503

A half-day-old hatchling leatherback turtle (Dermochelys coriacea) from the wild in Bioko. This species is listed as critically endangered by IUCN, and federally endangered (US).

Photo: Julie Jensen Director of Marketing | WVC O: 866.800.7326 | D: 702.443.9249 | E: j.jensen@wvc.org

Speaking Engagements

Joel is a popular keynote speaker with conservation, corporate, and civic groups.

Hire him to entertain and inspire your audience.

Book Joel To Speak

The Photo Ark

Joel is the founder of the Photo Ark, a groundbreaking effort to document every species in captivity before it’s too late.

Explore the Photo Ark

Visit Our Store

Every purchase goes directly to support our mission: getting the public to care and helping to save species from extinction.

Help Us Build the Ark