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ESA001-00508

Sara, the endangered (IUCN) and federally endangered whooping crane (Grus americana), at the Audubon Center for Research of Endangered Species. This is an educational bird.

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ESA001-00524

Sara, the endangered (IUCN) and federally endangered whooping crane (Grus americana), at the Audubon Center for Research of Endangered Species. This is an educational bird.

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ESA001-00509

Sara, the endangered (IUCN) and federally endangered whooping crane (Grus americana), at the Audubon Center for Research of Endangered Species. This is an educational bird.

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ESA001-00525

Sara, the endangered (IUCN) and federally endangered whooping crane (Grus americana), at the Audubon Center for Research of Endangered Species. This is an educational bird.

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ESA001-00510

Sara, the endangered (IUCN) and federally endangered whooping crane (Grus americana), at the Audubon Center for Research of Endangered Species. This is an educational bird.

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ESA001-00511

Sara, the endangered (IUCN) and federally endangered whooping crane (Grus americana), at the Audubon Center for Research of Endangered Species. This is an educational bird.

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ESA001-00512

Sara, the endangered (IUCN) and federally endangered whooping crane (Grus americana), at the Audubon Center for Research of Endangered Species. This is an educational bird.

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ESA001-00497

Miss Sandy Hill, a federally endangered Mississippi sandhill crane (Grus canadensis pulla), at the Audubon Center for Research of Endangered Species. Only 110 of this sandhill crane subspecies exists in the wild. Only another 45 birds are in captivity.

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ESA001-00498

Miss Sandy Hill, a federally endangered Mississippi sandhill crane (Grus canadensis pulla), at the Audubon Center for Research of Endangered Species. Only 110 of this sandhill crane subspecies exists in the wild. Only another 45 birds are in captivity.

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ESA001-00499

Miss Sandy Hill, a federally endangered Mississippi sandhill crane (Grus canadensis pulla), at the Audubon Center for Research of Endangered Species. Only 110 of this sandhill crane subspecies exists in the wild. Only another 45 birds are in captivity.

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ESA001-00500

Miss Sandy Hill, a federally endangered Mississippi sandhill crane (Grus canadensis pulla), at the Audubon Center for Research of Endangered Species. Only 110 of this sandhill crane subspecies exists in the wild. Only another 45 birds are in captivity.

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ESA001-00485

Miss Sandy Hill, a federally endangered Mississippi sandhill crane (Grus canadensis pulla), at the Audubon Center for Research of Endangered Species. Only 110 of this sandhill crane subspecies exists in the wild. Only another 45 birds are in captivity.

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ESA001-00501

Miss Sandy Hill, a federally endangered Mississippi sandhill crane (Grus canadensis pulla), at the Audubon Center for Research of Endangered Species. Only 110 of this sandhill crane subspecies exists in the wild. Only another 45 birds are in captivity.

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ESA001-00486

Miss Sandy Hill, a federally endangered Mississippi sandhill crane (Grus canadensis pulla), at the Audubon Center for Research of Endangered Species. Only 110 of this sandhill crane subspecies exists in the wild. Only another 45 birds are in captivity.

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ESA001-00502

Miss Sandy Hill, a federally endangered Mississippi sandhill crane (Grus canadensis pulla), at the Audubon Center for Research of Endangered Species. Only 110 of this sandhill crane subspecies exists in the wild. Only another 45 birds are in captivity.

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ESA001-00487

Miss Sandy Hill, a federally endangered Mississippi sandhill crane (Grus canadensis pulla), at the Audubon Center for Research of Endangered Species. Only 110 of this sandhill crane subspecies exists in the wild. Only another 45 birds are in captivity.

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ESA001-00503

Miss Sandy Hill, a federally endangered Mississippi sandhill crane (Grus canadensis pulla), at the Audubon Center for Research of Endangered Species. Only 110 of this sandhill crane subspecies exists in the wild. Only another 45 birds are in captivity.

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ESA001-00488

Miss Sandy Hill, a federally endangered Mississippi sandhill crane (Grus canadensis pulla), at the Audubon Center for Research of Endangered Species. Only 110 of this sandhill crane subspecies exists in the wild. Only another 45 birds are in captivity.

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ESA001-00504

Miss Sandy Hill, a federally endangered Mississippi sandhill crane (Grus canadensis pulla), at the Audubon Center for Research of Endangered Species. Only 110 of this sandhill crane subspecies exists in the wild. Only another 45 birds are in captivity.

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ESA001-00489

Miss Sandy Hill, a federally endangered Mississippi sandhill crane (Grus canadensis pulla), at the Audubon Center for Research of Endangered Species. Only 110 of this sandhill crane subspecies exists in the wild. Only another 45 birds are in captivity.

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ESA001-00505

Miss Sandy Hill, a federally endangered Mississippi sandhill crane (Grus canadensis pulla), at the Audubon Center for Research of Endangered Species. Only 110 of this sandhill crane subspecies exists in the wild. Only another 45 birds are in captivity.

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ESA001-00490

Miss Sandy Hill, a federally endangered Mississippi sandhill crane (Grus canadensis pulla), at the Audubon Center for Research of Endangered Species. Only 110 of this sandhill crane subspecies exists in the wild. Only another 45 birds are in captivity.

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ESA001-00491

Miss Sandy Hill, a federally endangered Mississippi sandhill crane (Grus canadensis pulla), at the Audubon Center for Research of Endangered Species. Only 110 of this sandhill crane subspecies exists in the wild. Only another 45 birds are in captivity.

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ESA001-00492

Miss Sandy Hill, a federally endangered Mississippi sandhill crane (Grus canadensis pulla), at the Audubon Center for Research of Endangered Species. Only 110 of this sandhill crane subspecies exists in the wild. Only another 45 birds are in captivity.

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ESA001-00493

Miss Sandy Hill, a federally endangered Mississippi sandhill crane (Grus canadensis pulla), at the Audubon Center for Research of Endangered Species. Only 110 of this sandhill crane subspecies exists in the wild. Only another 45 birds are in captivity.

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ESA001-00494

Miss Sandy Hill, a federally endangered Mississippi sandhill crane (Grus canadensis pulla), at the Audubon Center for Research of Endangered Species. Only 110 of this sandhill crane subspecies exists in the wild. Only another 45 birds are in captivity.

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ESA001-00495

Miss Sandy Hill, a federally endangered Mississippi sandhill crane (Grus canadensis pulla), at the Audubon Center for Research of Endangered Species. Only 110 of this sandhill crane subspecies exists in the wild. Only another 45 birds are in captivity.

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ESA001-00496

Miss Sandy Hill, a federally endangered Mississippi sandhill crane (Grus canadensis pulla), at the Audubon Center for Research of Endangered Species. Only 110 of this sandhill crane subspecies exists in the wild. Only another 45 birds are in captivity.

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ESA001-00484

A endangered (IUCN) and federally endangered whooping crane (Grus americana), at the Audubon Center for Research of Endangered Species. This is an educational bird named Sara.

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ESA001-00165

Unplanned product of a foster-parent program for endangered whooping cranes (Grus americana), a “whoopill” was sired out of a whooper out of a great Sandhill crane (Grus canadensis canadensis). Having failed to produce a single breeding female, biologists have abandoned their efforts to create a viable flock of whooping cranes, whose numbers in the wild have crept from 51 in 1973 to about 165 today. Many think that, rather than struggling to restore a creature so near extinction, efforts should be concentrated on species in the early stages of danger.

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ANI082-00022

Sandhill cranes (Grus canadensis) in flight over the Platte River near the Rowe Audubon Sanctuary in Gibbon, Nebraska.

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ANI082-00023

Thousands of sandhill cranes (Grus canadensis) roost on the Platte River during their annual migratory stopover at the Rowe Audubon Sanctuary near Gibbon, NE. With water in the river fully appropriated for urban areas and agriculture, many wonder how long it will be until the river runs dry. Some 600,000 to 800,000 cranes use just a few miles of the river in central Nebraska–areas that have been been mechanically cleared of the woody vegetation that the birds can’t tolerate.

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ANI082-00020

Thousands of sandhill cranes (Grus canadensis) roost on the Platte River during their annual migratory stopover at the Rowe Audubon Sanctuary near Gibbon, NE. With water in the river fully appropriated for urban areas and agriculture, many wonder how long it will be until the river runs dry. Some 600,000 to 800,000 cranes use just a few miles of the river in central Nebraska–areas that have been been mechanically cleared of the woody vegetation that the birds can’t tolerate.

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ANI082-00021

Sandhill cranes (Grus canadensis) kettling over the Platte River, near the Rowe Audubon Sanctuary in Gibbon, Nebraska.

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ANI082-00006

Thousands of sandhill cranes (Grus canadensis) roost on the Platte River during their annual migratory stopover at the Rowe Audubon Sanctuary near Gibbon, NE. With water in the river fully appropriated for urban areas and agriculture, many wonder how long it will be until the river runs dry. Some 600,000 to 800,000 cranes use just a few miles of the river in central Nebraska–areas that have been been mechanically cleared of the woody vegetation that the birds can’t tolerate.

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ANI082-00007

Thousands of sandhill cranes (Grus canadensis) roost on the Platte River during their annual migratory stopover at the Rowe Audubon Sanctuary near Gibbon, NE. With water in the river fully appropriated for urban areas and agriculture, many wonder how long it will be until the river runs dry. Some 600,000 to 800,000 cranes use just a few miles of the river in central Nebraska–areas that have been been mechanically cleared of the woody vegetation that the birds can’t tolerate.

Photo: Julie Jensen Director of Marketing | WVC O: 866.800.7326 | D: 702.443.9249 | E: j.jensen@wvc.org

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