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ANI062-00137

A researcher from the Texas Marine Mammal Stranding Network photographs dead bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) washed up from the Gulf of Mexico in a research effort to determine what killed the animals.

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BIR017-00034

White pelicans (Pelecanus erythrorhynchos) in migration flight over a barrier island fringing a Louisiana salt marsh in the Gulf of Mexico.

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Condominiums along Sand Key along the Gulf of Mexico near Clearwater-St. Petersburg, Florida.

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ENV007-00029

A Louisiana-built oil drilling and production platform is carried by a Barge toward the Gulf of Mexico.

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A crucifix sculpture by artists of the Baptist center stands amid students and sunbathers on South Padre Island, Texas.

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ENV021-00081

On board a PHI helicopter/media flight covering the deep water horizon oil spill at the spill site, two types of burning are now going on. The big black column of smoke is from oil being burned after being skimmed up with ships towing booms. The second kind of burning is coming in the forms of big flares at the actual relief well drilling site itself. A new rig has been brought in to directly burn off whatever it can pull off the tophat, which some have estimated at a million gallons a day.

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ENV021-00082

On board a PHI helicopter/media flight covering the deep water horizon oil spill at the spill site, two types of burning are now going on. The big black column of smoke is from oil being burned after being skimmed up with ships towing booms. The second kind of burning is coming in the forms of big flares at the actual relief well drilling site itself. A new rig has been brought in to directly burn off whatever it can pull off the tophat, which some have estimated at a million gallons a day.

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ENV021-00083

On board a PHI helicopter/media flight covering the deep water horizon oil spill at the spill site, two types of burning are now going on. The big black column of smoke is from oil being burned after being skimmed up with ships towing booms. The second kind of burning is coming in the forms of big flares at the actual relief well drilling site itself. A new rig has been brought in to directly burn off whatever it can pull off the tophat, which some have estimated at a million gallons a day.

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ENV021-00066

Sand berms frame rows of beach houses on Dauphin Island, Alabama during the deep water horizon oil spill.

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ENV021-00067

Sand berms frame rows of beach houses on Dauphin Island, Alabama during the deep water horizon oil spill.

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ENV021-00052

An aerial of an watercraft cutting through the surface oil near the deep water horizon spill site in the Gulf of Mexico.

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ENV021-00053

An aerial of watercraft cutting through the surface oil near the deep water horizon spill site in the Gulf of Mexico.

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ENV021-00046

Burning surface oil not far from the Deepwater Horizon spill site creates huge black columns of smoke in the Gulf of Mexico.

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ENV021-00047

Burning surface oil not far from the Deepwater Horizon spill site creates huge black columns of smoke in the Gulf of Mexico.

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ENV021-00049

Boats burning off surface oil not near the Deepwater Horizon spill site creating huge black columns of smoke in the Gulf of Mexico.

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ENV021-00050

This aerial shows two types of burn-offs used on the Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico. The big black column of smoke is from oil being burned after being skimmed up with ships towing booms. The second kind of burning is coming in the forms of big flares at the actual relief well drilling site itself. A new rig has been brought in to directly burn off whatever it can pull off the tophat, which some have estimated at a million gallons a day.

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ENV021-00051

This aerial shows two types of burn-offs used on the Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico. The big black column of smoke is from oil being burned after being skimmed up with ships towing booms. The second kind of burning is coming in the forms of big flares at the actual relief well drilling site itself. A new rig has been brought in to directly burn off whatever it can pull off the tophat, which some have estimated at a million gallons a day.

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ENV021-00043

Aerial view of the oil booms deployed around Queen Bess Island in an attempt to protect it from the Deepwater Horizon spill. They proved largely ineffective in keeping this important bird rookery safe from oil.

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ENV021-00045

A crew of BP contractors attempt to siphon oil from the Deepwater Horizon spill out of a marsh in the Gulf of Mexico.

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ENV021-00008

A boat pulls booms over the water in Barataria Bay, Louisiana, cleaning up oil from the Deepwater Horizon Spill.

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ENV021-00025

A thick oil slick, from the Deepwater Horizon oil spill, covers the water in Barataria Bay, Louisiana.

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ENV021-00001

Boats burn off surface oil not far from the Deepwater Horizon spill site, creating huge black columns of smoke in the Gulf of Mexico.

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ENV021-00006

A dead sea turtle floating in an oil slick from the Deepwater Horizon spill, in Barataria Bay, Louisiana.

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American white ibis (Eudocimus albus) at Trinity Bay along the Gulf coast, Texas.

Photo: Julie Jensen Director of Marketing | WVC O: 866.800.7326 | D: 702.443.9249 | E: j.jensen@wvc.org

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