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ANI031-00110

Bryn, the federally endangered Columbia Basin pygmy rabbit (Brachylagus idahoensis), sat for this portrait in 2007 at the Oregon Zoo in Portland, Oregon. She was one of two female Columbia Basin pygmy rabbits left, the end of the line for this race of animals. Since there are no males left, this means only animals intercrossed with the Idaho race will survive. She died in 2008, marking the end of her genetic line. This subpopulation lost its sagebrush habitat as the land was developed for agriculture in the state of Washington.

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ANI082-00181

Aerials of the Jonah Field in the Green River Basin, Wyoming. A once-wild area that’s now an industrial zone due to natural gas drilling. Sage grouse, mule deer and pronghorn antelope habitat has mostly been ruined here, with no end in sight as the drilling increases across the Pinedale Anticline, the large mesa that caps the gas deposits.

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ANI082-00182

Aerials of the Jonah Field in the Green River Basin, Wyoming. A once-wild area that’s now an industrial zone due to natural gas drilling. Sage grouse, mule deer and pronghorn antelope habitat has mostly been ruined here, with no end in sight as the drilling increases across the Pinedale Anticline, the large mesa that caps the gas deposits.

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ANI031-00111

Bryn, the federally endangered Columbia Basin pygmy rabbit (Brachylagus idahoensis), sat for this portrait in 2007 at the Oregon Zoo in Portland, Oregon. She was one of two female Columbia Basin pygmy rabbits left, the end of the line for this species of animals. Since there are no males left, this means only animals intercrossed with the Idaho race will survive. She died in 2008, marking the end of her genetic line. This subpopulation lost its sagebrush habitat as the land was developed for agriculture in the state of Washington.

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ANI031-00112

Bryn, the federally endangered Columbia Basin pygmy rabbit (Brachylagus idahoensis), sat for this portrait in 2007 at the Oregon Zoo in Portland, Oregon. She was one of two female Columbia Basin pygmy rabbits left, the end of the line for this species of animals. Since there are no males left, this means only animals intercrossed with the Idaho race will survive. She died in 2008, marking the end of her genetic line. This subpopulation lost its sagebrush habitat as the land was developed for agriculture in the state of Washington.

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ANI031-00101

Bryn, the federally endangered Columbia Basin pygmy rabbit (Brachylagus idahoensis), sat for this portrait in 2007 at the Oregon Zoo in Portland, Oregon. She was one of two female Columbia Basin pygmy rabbits left, the end of the line for this species of animals. Since there are no males left, this means only animals intercrossed with the Idaho race will survive. She died in 2008, marking the end of her genetic line. This subpopulation lost its sagebrush habitat as the land was developed for agriculture in the state of Washington.

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ANI031-00102

Bryn, the federally endangered Columbia Basin pygmy rabbit (Brachylagus idahoensis), sat for this portrait in 2007 at the Oregon Zoo in Portland, Oregon. She was one of two female Columbia Basin pygmy rabbits left, the end of the line for this species of animals. Since there are no males left, this means only animals intercrossed with the Idaho race will survive. She died in 2008, marking the end of her genetic line. This subpopulation lost its sagebrush habitat as the land was developed for agriculture in the state of Washington.

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ANI031-00103

Bryn, the federally endangered Columbia Basin pygmy rabbit (Brachylagus idahoensis), sat for this portrait in 2007 at the Oregon Zoo in Portland, Oregon. She was one of two female Columbia Basin pygmy rabbits left, the end of the line for this species of animals. Since there are no males left, this means only animals intercrossed with the Idaho race will survive. She died in 2008, marking the end of her genetic line. This subpopulation lost its sagebrush habitat as the land was developed for agriculture in the state of Washington.

Photo

ANI031-00104

Bryn, the federally endangered Columbia Basin pygmy rabbit (Brachylagus idahoensis), sat for this portrait in 2007 at the Oregon Zoo in Portland, Oregon. She was one of two female Columbia Basin pygmy rabbits left, the end of the line for this species of animals. Since there are no males left, this means only animals intercrossed with the Idaho race will survive. She died in 2008, marking the end of her genetic line. This subpopulation lost its sagebrush habitat as the land was developed for agriculture in the state of Washington.

Photo

ANI031-00105

Bryn, the federally endangered Columbia Basin pygmy rabbit (Brachylagus idahoensis), sat for this portrait in 2007 at the Oregon Zoo in Portland, Oregon. She was one of two female Columbia Basin pygmy rabbits left, the end of the line for this species of animals. Since there are no males left, this means only animals intercrossed with the Idaho race will survive. She died in 2008, marking the end of her genetic line. This subpopulation lost its sagebrush habitat as the land was developed for agriculture in the state of Washington.

Photo

ANI031-00106

Bryn, the federally endangered Columbia Basin pygmy rabbit (Brachylagus idahoensis), sat for this portrait in 2007 at the Oregon Zoo in Portland, Oregon. She was one of two female Columbia Basin pygmy rabbits left, the end of the line for this species of animals. Since there are no males left, this means only animals intercrossed with the Idaho race will survive. She died in 2008, marking the end of her genetic line. This subpopulation lost its sagebrush habitat as the land was developed for agriculture in the state of Washington.

Photo

ANI031-00107

Bryn, the federally endangered Columbia Basin pygmy rabbit (Brachylagus idahoensis), sat for this portrait in 2007 at the Oregon Zoo in Portland, Oregon. She was one of two female Columbia Basin pygmy rabbits left, the end of the line for this species of animals. Since there are no males left, this means only animals intercrossed with the Idaho race will survive. She died in 2008, marking the end of her genetic line. This subpopulation lost its sagebrush habitat as the land was developed for agriculture in the state of Washington.

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ANI031-00108

Bryn, the federally endangered Columbia Basin pygmy rabbit (Brachylagus idahoensis), sat for this portrait in 2007 at the Oregon Zoo in Portland, Oregon. She was one of two female Columbia Basin pygmy rabbits left, the end of the line for this species of animals. Since there are no males left, this means only animals intercrossed with the Idaho race will survive. She died in 2008, marking the end of her genetic line. This subpopulation lost its sagebrush habitat as the land was developed for agriculture in the state of Washington.

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ANI031-00109

Bryn, the federally endangered Columbia Basin pygmy rabbit (Brachylagus idahoensis), sat for this portrait in 2007 at the Oregon Zoo in Portland, Oregon. She was one of two female Columbia Basin pygmy rabbits left, the end of the line for this species of animals. Since there are no males left, this means only animals intercrossed with the Idaho race will survive. She died in 2008, marking the end of her genetic line. This subpopulation lost its sagebrush habitat as the land was developed for agriculture in the state of Washington.

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ESA001-00037

Captive northern spotted owl (Strix occidentalis caurina) in a clearcut near Merlin, Oregon. Habitat loss and climate change are the two primary factors leading to the extinction of species. (US: Threatened)

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A fire burns in the Cerrado along the highway to Caceres in Brazil’s Pantanal region. Though clearing areas for agriculture using fire has been banned in the region, the practice continues.

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A fire burns in the Cerrado along the highway to Caceres in Brazil’s Pantanal region. Though clearing areas for agriculture using fire has been banned in the region, the practice continues.

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ANI017-00239

A kaiser spotted newt (Neurergus kaiseri) from Conservation Fisheries. This species is endangered in Iran due to habitat destruction and over collecting.

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ANI017-00238

A kaiser spotted newt (Neurergus kaiseri) from Conservation Fisheries. This species is endangered in Iran due to habitat destruction and over collecting.

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ANI017-00237

A kaiser spotted newt (Neurergus kaiseri) from Conservation Fisheries. This species is endangered in Iran due to habitat destruction and over collecting.

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ANI017-00236

A kaiser spotted newt (Neurergus kaiseri) from Conservation Fisheries. This species is endangered in Iran due to habitat destruction and over collecting.

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ANI017-00235

A kaiser spotted newt (Neurergus kaiseri) from Conservation Fisheries. This species is endangered in Iran due to habitat destruction and over collecting.

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ANI017-00234

A kaiser spotted newt (Neurergus kaiseri) from Conservation Fisheries. This species is endangered in Iran due to habitat destruction and over collecting.

Photo: Julie Jensen Director of Marketing | WVC O: 866.800.7326 | D: 702.443.9249 | E: j.jensen@wvc.org

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