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BIR002-00089

A bald eagle chick with its surrogate mother, a hand puppet resembling an adult bald eagle, at the Sutton Avian Research Center near Bartlesville, Oklahoma. The hand puppet is used extensively to get the chicks to feed during their first few weeks of life.

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BIR002-00031

An 18-day-old bald eagle chick at the Sutton Avian Research Center in Bartlesville, Oklahoma, This chick was hatched in captivity as part of the Bald Eagle Recovery Act. After the chicks are seven days old, they will never see nor hear their human hosts in order to keep the birds wild.

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BIR002-00030

A bald eagle chick is moved out of the chick lab and into a large barn nearby by workers wearing “ghost costumes” at the Sutton Avian Research Center’s incubation room near Bartlesville, OK. This chick was hatched in captivity as part of the Bald Eagle Recovery Act. After the chick is seven days old, it will never see nor hear its human host in order to keep the bird wild.

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BIR002-00088

A bald eagle chick is weighed by workers wearing “ghost costumes” at the Sutton Avian Research Center’s incubation room near Bartlesville, OK. This chick was hatched in captivity as part of the Bald Eagle Recovery Act. After the chick is seven days old, it will never see nor hear its human host in order to keep the bird wild.

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BIR002-00087

A bald eagle chick is weighed by workers wearing “ghost costumes” at the Sutton Avian Research Center’s incubation room near Bartlesville, OK. This chick was hatched in captivity as part of the Bald Eagle Recovery Act. After the chick is seven days old, it will never see nor hear its human host in order to keep the bird wild.

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BIR002-00086

A bald eagle chick is weighed by workers wearing “ghost costumes” at the Sutton Avian Research Center’s incubation room near Bartlesville, OK. This chick was hatched in captivity as part of the Bald Eagle Recovery Act. After the chick is seven days old, it will never see nor hear its human host in order to keep the bird wild.

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BIR002-00085

A bald eagle chick is weighed by workers wearing “ghost costumes” at the Sutton Avian Research Center’s incubation room near Bartlesville, OK. This chick was hatched in captivity as part of the Bald Eagle Recovery Act. After the chick is seven days old, it will never see nor hear its human host in order to keep the bird wild.

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BIR002-00084

A bald eagle chick is fed by a hand puppet at the Sutton Avian Research Center’s incubation room near Bartlesville, OK. This chick was hatched in captivity as part of the Bald Eagle Recovery Act.

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BIR002-00083

A bald eagle chick is fed by a hand puppet at the Sutton Avian Research Center’s incubation room near Bartlesville, OK. This chick was hatched in captivity as part of the Bald Eagle Recovery Act.

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ANI025-00471

The eggs of the white-spotted glass frog or white-spotted cochran frog (Sachatamia albomaculata), a species native to Panama and Central America, at Zoo Atlanta.

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ANI025-00470

The eggs of the white-spotted glass frog or white-spotted cochran frog (Sachatamia albomaculata), a species native to Panama and Central America, at Zoo Atlanta.

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ANI025-00469

The eggs of the white-spotted glass frog or white-spotted cochran frog (Sachatamia albomaculata), a species native to Panama and Central America, at Zoo Atlanta.

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BIR005-00033

Japanese coturnix quail (Coturnix japonica) at a hatchery located on the grounds of the Sutton Avian Research Center near Bartlesville, OK.

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BIR005-00032

Japanese coturnix quail (Coturnix japonica) at a hatchery located on the grounds of the Sutton Avian Research Center near Bartlesville, OK.

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BIR005-00031

Japanese coturnix quail (Coturnix japonica) at a hatchery located on the grounds of the Sutton Avian Research Center near Bartlesville, OK.

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BIR008-00079

Critically endangered (IUCN) and federallly endangered California condor chick, (Gymnogyps californianus), pecking its way into the world at acaptive breeding facility.

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BIR008-00068

A biologist holds a newly hatched California condor chick, (Gymnogyps californianus), critically endangered (IUCN) and federally endangered; at the San Diego Wild Animal Park’s captive breeding facility.

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BIR008-00067

A biologist holds a newly hatched California condor chick, (Gymnogyps californianus), critically endangered (IUCN) and federally endangered; at the San Diego Wild Animal Park’s captive breeding facility.

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BIR008-00065

A biologist holds a newly hatched California condor chick, (Gymnogyps californianus), critically endangered (IUCN) and federally endangered; at the San Diego Wild Animal Park’s captive breeding facility.

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BIR008-00066

A biologist holds a newly hatched California condor chick, (Gymnogyps californianus), critically endangered (IUCN) and federally endangered; at the San Diego Wild Animal Park’s captive breeding facility.

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BIR008-00064

A biologist holds a newly hatched California condor chick, (Gymnogyps californianus), critically endangered (IUCN) and federally endangered; at the San Diego Wild Animal Park’s captive breeding facility.

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BIR008-00063

A newly hatched California condor chick, (Gymnogyps californianus), critically endangered (IUCN) and federally endangered; at the San Diego Wild Animal Park’s captive breeding facility.

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BIR008-00023

A biologist holds a newly hatched California condor chick, (Gymnogyps californianus), critically endangered (IUCN) and federally endangered at a captive breeding facility.

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BIR008-00008

A biologist holds a newly hatched California condor chick, (Gymnogyps californianus), critically endangered (IUCN) and federally endangered at a captive breeding facility.

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BIR008-00009

A biologist holds a newly hatched California condor chick, (Gymnogyps californianus), critically endangered (IUCN) and federally endangered at a captive breeding facility.

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BIR008-00001

Critically endangered (IUCN) and federally endangered California condor chick, (Gymnogyps californianus), pecking its way into the world at acaptive breeding facility.

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BIR002-00047

At the Sutton Avian Research Center, bald eagle eggs are hatched as part of the Southern Bald Eagle Restoration Program. This particular egg developed a small hole during incubation that workers mended with a special adhesive so that the chick could continue to develop and hatch.

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BIR002-00048

At the Sutton Avian Research Center, bald eagle eggs are hatched as part of the Southern Bald Eagle Restoration Program. This chick has bandages on his stomach to staunch bleeding where his stomach was connected to the inside of the egg.

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BIR002-00046

At the Sutton Avian Research Center, bald eagle eggs are hatched as part of the Southern Bald Eagle Restoration Program. This particular egg developed a small hole during incubation that workers mended with a special adhesive so that the chick could continue to develop and hatch.

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BIR002-00045

At the Sutton Avian Research Center, bald eagle eggs are hatched as part of the Southern Bald Eagle Restoration Program. This particular egg developed a small hole during incubation that workers mended with a special adhesive so that the chick could continue to develop and hatch.

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BIR002-00043

At the Sutton Avian Research Center, bald eagle eggs are hatched as part of the Southern Bald Eagle Restoration Program. This particular egg developed a small hole during incubation that workers mended with a special adhesive so that the chick could continue to develop.

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BIR002-00044

At the Sutton Avian Research Center, bald eagle eggs are hatched as part of the Southern Bald Eagle Restoration Program. This particular egg developed a small hole during incubation that workers mended with a special adhesive so that the chick could continue to develop.

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BIR002-00042

At the Sutton Avian Research Center, bald eagle eggs are hatched as part of the Southern Bald Eagle Restoration Program.

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BIR002-00002

Bald eagle chicks at the Sutton Avian Research Center near Bartlesville, OK. They were hatched in captivity as part of the Bald Eagle Recovery Act.

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APC005-00004

The nest of a captive female Attwater’s prairie-chicken (endangered.) Few of these eggs will hatch, and few of the surviving chicks will make it to adulthood.

Photo: Julie Jensen Director of Marketing | WVC O: 866.800.7326 | D: 702.443.9249 | E: j.jensen@wvc.org

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