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Monarchs (Danaus plexippus) in the Sierra Chincua sanctuary, Mexico.

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Millions of monarch butterflies (Danaus plexippus) roost on the Sierra Chincua (Chincua mountain) near Angangueo, Mexico. This is one of five wintering roosts for monarchs, where the cool mountain climate slows their metabolism enough for them to overwinter before migrating back northward in the spring. Logging threatens this spectacle: already one of the five sites is no longer used by the butterflies due to the forest being cleared.

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Millions of monarch butterflies (Danaus plexippus) roost on the Sierra Chincua (Chincua mountain) near Angangueo, Mexico. This is one of five wintering roosts for monarchs, where the cool mountain climate slows their metabolism enough for them to overwinter before migrating back northward in the spring. Logging threatens this spectacle: already one of the five sites is no longer used by the butterflies due to the forest being cleared.

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Millions of monarch butterflies (Danaus plexippus) roost on the Sierra Chincua (Chincua mountain) near Angangueo, Mexico. This is one of five wintering roosts for monarchs, where the cool mountain climate slows their metabolism enough for them to overwinter before migrating back northward in the spring. Logging threatens this spectacle: already one of the five sites is no longer used by the butterflies due to the forest being cleared.

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Millions of monarch butterflies (Danaus plexippus) roost on the Sierra Chincua (Chincua mountain) near Angangueo, Mexico. This is one of five wintering roosts for monarchs, where the cool mountain climate slows their metabolism enough for them to overwinter before migrating back northward in the spring. Logging threatens this spectacle: already one of the five sites is no longer used by the butterflies due to the forest being cleared.

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A bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) in Bighorn Creek which is part of the Kootenay river system in British Columbia, Canada. (IUCN: Vulnerable; US: Federally threatened)

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A bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) in Bighorn Creek which is part of the Kootenay river system in British Columbia, Canada. (IUCN: Vulnerable; US: Federally threatened)

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An ocelot (Leopardus pardalis) photographed with a camera trap in Laguna Atascosa National Wildlife Refuge in Texas.

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A bobcat (Lynx rufus) traverses along the Mexican-Texas border. A border wall along the lower Rio Grande in Texas divides nations as well as habitats, hindering daily essential movements of animals in the area. Bobcats would normally cross the border to find mates or catch dinner. The wall also blocks the dailly rounds of ocelots, another member of the cat family. Photograph by Joel Sartore with Mitch Sternberg, Jennifer Lowry, and Naghma Malik, all U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

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Cliff swallows (Petrochelidon pyrrhonota) flying into their mud nests under a county bridge near Raymond, Nebraska.

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Cliff swallows (Petrochelidon pyrrhonota) flying into their mud nests under a county bridge near Raymond, Nebraska.

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An interior least tern (Sterna antillarum), a federally endangered species, on its nest at the Western Sand and Gravel mine along the Platte River near Fremont, NE. Many mine companies are pausing work during the nesting season in areas this bird and other rare species use.

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Biologists tag a male bobolink (Dolichonyx oryzivorus) in Nebraska. They will put tiny geolocators, which track sun intensity as well as sunrise and sunset, the birds’ backs. When the birds are recaptured (months from now) and the data is downloaded and used to calculate the birds’ migratory route. The species winters in South America, but little is known of its specific route.

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A grasshopper sparrow (Ammodramus savannarum) nest is well camouflaged in the thick prairie grasses along the Platte River near Wood River, Nebraska.

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Mexican free-tailed bats (Tadarida brasiliensis) swirl out of the Eckert James River Bat Cave at sunset to feed on insects. This maternity colony builds to more than 6 million bats in late July, making it one of the largest in the world. It is owned and managed by The Nature Conservancy.

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Mexican free-tailed bats (Tadarida brasiliensis) swirl out of the Eckert James River Bat Cave at sunset to feed on insects. This maternity colony builds to more than 6 million bats in late July, making it one of the largest in the world. It is owned and managed by The Nature Conservancy.

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Endangered (US and IUCN) golden-cheeked warblers (Dendroica chrysoparia) Killeen, Texas.

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Endangered (US and IUCN) golden-cheeked warblers (Dendroica chrysoparia) Killeen, Texas.

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Biologists capture a male bobolink (Dolichonyx oryzivorus) near Wood River, Nebraska. They will put tiny geolocators, which track sun intensity as well as sunrise and sunset, the birds’ backs. When the birds are recaptured (months from now) and the data is downloaded and used to calculate the birds’ migratory route. The species winters in South America, but little is known of its specific route.

Photo: Julie Jensen Director of Marketing | WVC O: 866.800.7326 | D: 702.443.9249 | E: j.jensen@wvc.org

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