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Joel Sartore photographs a Yaqui catfish (Ictalurus pricei) at the Arizona Sonora Desert Museum in Tucson, AZ.

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Scenes from the Ark shoot inside the reptile house at the Assam State Zoo in Guwahati, Assam, India.

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Joel Sartore with a Horned screamer on assignment at the National Aviary of Colombia.

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A sitatunga antelope presses against a man at a safari lodge.

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Two brothers get together for their dad’s 85th birthday.

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Two brothers get together for their dad’s 85th birthday.

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An injured black flying fox delicately “tastes” Joel’s thumb at the Australia Bat Clinic in Advancetown, Queensland. Huge bats such as these are smart, social and play extremely critical roles in the environment, both as pollinators of crops and as seed dispersers.

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At day’s end, Joel Sartore shows pheasant photos to the bird keepers at the Houston Zoo.

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During a portrait with his dad, Cole Sartore (right) eats his breakfast of French toast sticks from Burger King at the Sunset Zoo.

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A containment box is used to photograph Edward’s pheasants at the Sunset Zoo. This bird is so rare it’s nearly extinct in the wild now.

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Joel Sartore on assignment for NGM, by Gerald Herbert/AP. An oil covered pelican sits stuck in thick beached oil at Queen Bess Island in Barataria Bay, just off the Gulf of Mexico in Plaquemines Parish, La., Saturday, June 5, 2010. (AP Photo/Gerald Herbert – Call 402.474.1006 for licensing info.)

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National Geographic photographer Joel Sartore stops for a quick nap with a lion, tranquilized by researchers, in Uganda’s Albertine Rift.

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Joel Sartore photographs a Galapagos sea lion (Zalophus wollebaeki) while on assignment on Espanola Island in the Galapagos. (Photo by Michael S. Nolan – visit www.wildlifeimages.net for contact/licensing info.)

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An injured black flying fox delicately “tastes” Joel’s thumb at the Australia Bat Clinic in Advancetown, Queensland. Huge bats such as these are smart, social and play extremely critical roles in the environment, both as pollinators of crops and as seed dispersers.

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Joel Sartore proudly displays a rake rescued from the curb on garbage night.

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Joel Sartore displays appliances rescued from the curb on garbage night.

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Joel Sartore patrols the curbs in his neighborhood in hopes of rescuing still useful items before they’re hauled to the dump.

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Joel Sartore patrols the curbs in his neighborhood in hopes of rescuing still useful items before they’re hauled to the dump.

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Joel Sartore,National Geographic photographer, standing amongst a herd of bison (Bison bison) on the prairie at Maxwell State Game Preserve in Canton, Kansas.

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Joel Sartore, National Geographic photographer, standing amongst a herd of bison (Bison bison) on the prairie at Maxwell State Game Preserve in Canton, Kansas.

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Joel Sartore on assignment at Sierra Chincua in Mexico, home to the world’s largest gathering of monarch butterflies.

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Joel Sartore and his son, Cole, stop to take a photograph together in the Walton area of Glacier National Park, Montana.

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Joel Sartore, on assignment for National Geographic magazine, while photographing the Deepwater Horizon oil spill in Barataria Bay, Louisiana.

Photo: Julie Jensen Director of Marketing | WVC O: 866.800.7326 | D: 702.443.9249 | E: j.jensen@wvc.org

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