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A great green bush cricket (Tettigonia viridissima) at the Plzen Zoo in the Czech Republic.

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Great green bush cricket (Tettigonia viridissima) at the Plzen Zoo in the Czech Republic.

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Great green bush cricket (Tettigonia viridissima) at the Plzen Zoo in the Czech Republic.

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False robust conehead (Neoconocephalus bivocatus) at the St. Louis Zoo.

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False robust conehead (Neoconocephalus bivocatus) at the St. Louis Zoo.

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A giant katydid (Stilpnochlora couloniana) female, at the Central Florida Zoo.

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A giant katydid (Stilpnochlora couloniana) female, at the Central Florida Zoo.

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A male katydid (Chloroscirtus discocercus), which was caught in the wild in Gamboa, Panama.

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A male katydid (Chloroscirtus discocercus), which was caught in the wild in Gamboa, Panama.

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A greater angle-wing (Microcentrum rhombifolium) collected from the wild at Big Bend Wildlife Management Area.

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A greater angle-wing (Microcentrum rhombifolium) collected from the wild at Big Bend Wildlife Management Area.

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Two Haldeman’s shieldback katydids (Pediodectes haldemani) at the Dallas Zoo.

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A Haldeman’s shieldback katydid (Pediodectes haldemani) at the Dallas Zoo.

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A pink oblong-winged katydid (Amblycorypha oblongifolia) at the Omaha Henry Doorly Zoo, Omaha, Nebraska.

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A pink oblong-winged katydid (Amblycorypha oblongifolia) at the Omaha Henry Doorly Zoo, Omaha, Nebraska.

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A giant Malayan katydid (Macrolyristes corporalis) at the Omaha Henry Doorly Zoo, Omaha, Nebraska.

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A giant Malayan katydid (Macrolyristes corporalis) at the Omaha Henry Doorly Zoo, Omaha, Nebraska.

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A giant Malayan katydid (Macrolyristes corporalis) at the Omaha Henry Doorly Zoo, Omaha, Nebraska.

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A giant Malayan katydid (Macrolyristes corporalis) at the Omaha Henry Doorly Zoo, Omaha, Nebraska.

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A dragon headed katydid (Eumegalodon blanchardi) at the Omaha Henry Doorly Zoo, Omaha, Nebraska.

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A small hooded katydid (Phyllophorella queenslandica) at the Wild Life Sydney Zoo.

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Small hooded katydids (Phyllophorella queenslandica) at the Wild Life Sydney Zoo.

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Nymph of the conehead katydid (Neoconocephalus sp.) from Dieken Prairie near Undadilla, Nebraska.

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Nymph of the fork-tailed katydid (Scudderia furcata) from Dieken Prairie near Undadilla, Nebraska.

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Hooded katydids (Phyllophorella queenslandica) at Wild Life Sydney Zoo.

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Oblong-winged katydids (Amblycorypha oblongifolia) at the Insectarium in New Orleans. These color variants are found in nature, though anything but green is usually eaten by predators immediately. The Insectarium has been a leader in breeding these color variants for display in the zoo community.

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Oblong-winged katydids (Amblycorypha oblongifolia) at the Insectarium in New Orleans. These color variants are found in nature, though anything but green is usually eaten by predators immediately. The Insectarium has been a leader in breeding these color variants for display in the zoo community.

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Greater-arid land katydid (Neobarrettia spinosa) at the Insectarium in New Orleans.

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Oblong-winged katydid (Amblycorypha oblongifolia) at the Omaha Henry Doorly Zoo. This one is pink, an unusual color morph. The pink katydids range throughout most of the United States; particularly the midwest and north east. The most common color phase is green. These animals rely primarily on camouflage to defend against predators. Occasionally, pink and even orange katydids are found. This is caused by genes, not diet, age, or sex. Recent evidence has shown that the pink color phase is actually dominant over green when bred in the lab. However, in the wild, the pink katydids are more readily picked off by predators before reaching maturity. The individuals do not appear to be aware of their color and do not change their life patterns accordingly.

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Dragon-headed katydid (Eumegalodon blanchardi) at the Omaha Henry Doorly Zoo.

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An endemic species of katydid (Liparoscelis cooksoni) on Santa Cruz Island, on the edge of Galapagos National Park.

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Juvenile katydid, Arantia sp., from Bioko Island, Equatorial Guinea.

Photo: Julie Jensen Director of Marketing | WVC O: 866.800.7326 | D: 702.443.9249 | E: j.jensen@wvc.org

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