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An elephant, poached not far from the ranger station well inside Queen Elizabeth National Park. The ivory from this animal represents a fortune to local villagers…as more people move in, the pressure to poach will only increase.

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A local resident draws a laugh from her daughter by donning the head of a musk ox (Ovibos moschatus) recently shot by her husband. Sport hunters are allowed to kill approximately 70 of these animals, once extinct in Alaska, per year.

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A mountain biker and tire tracks that threaten to destroy living desert crust near Arches National Park, Utah.

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Bush meat shoppers pay to have the fur singed off a drill monkey in Malabo on Bioko island, Equatorial Guinea.

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A father and son view a fish kill, some of the 182 million fish which suffocated when organic matter depleted the oxygen supply in the Atchafalaya river basin after hurricane Andrew.

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A researcher from the Texas Marine Mammal Stranding Network photographs dead bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) washed up from the Gulf of Mexico in a research effort to determine what killed the animals.

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The snake pit at the 45th annual Mangum Rattlesnake Derby in Mangum, Oklahoma. This rattlesnake festival takes in between 1,500 and 2,000 pounds of western diamondback rattlesnakes (Crotalus atrox) each year. Some 30,000 people come here on the last weekend of April to see such things as a photo booth in which people can pose with a live rattler that’s been defanged and had its mouth stitched shut, a safari bus tour in which folks can pick up a live rattlesnake, a cafe serving rattlesnake meat, and a butcher shop.

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The snake pit at the 45th annual Mangum Rattlesnake Derby in Mangum, Oklahoma. This rattlesnake festival takes in between 1,500 and 2,000 pounds of western diamondback rattlesnakes (Crotalus atrox) each year. Some 30,000 people come here on the last weekend of April to see such things as a photo booth in which people can pose with a live rattler that’s been defanged and had its mouth stitched shut, a safari bus tour in which folks can pick up a live rattlesnake, a cafe serving rattlesnake meat, and a butcher shop.

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The snake pit at the 45th annual Mangum Rattlesnake Derby in Mangum, Oklahoma. This rattlesnake festival takes in between 1,500 and 2,000 pounds of western diamondback rattlesnakes (Crotalus atrox) each year. Some 30,000 people come here on the last weekend of April to see such things as a photo booth in which people can pose with a live rattler that’s been defanged and had its mouth stitched shut, a safari bus tour in which folks can pick up a live rattlesnake, a cafe serving rattlesnake meat, and a butcher shop.

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A western cottonmouth (Agkistrodon piscivorous) snake lies dead on the Clear Creek Levy Road, near Ware, Illinois. Road kills are one of the leading causes of death for snakes in the U.S.

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A western cottonmouth snake (Agkistrodon piscivorous) lies on the Snake Road, near Ware, Illinois. This three mile stretch of road along the is closed to traffic when the snakes are migrating from limestone cliffs to the swamp nearby.

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The snake pit at the 45th annual Mangum Rattlesnake Derby in Mangum, Oklahoma. This rattlesnake festival takes in between 1,500 and 2,000 pounds of western diamondback rattlesnakes (Crotalus atrox) each year. Some 30,000 people come here on the last weekend of April to see such things as a photo booth in which people can pose with a live rattler that’s been defanged and had its mouth stitched shut, a safari bus tour in which folks can pick up a live rattlesnake, a cafe serving rattlesnake meat, and a butcher shop.

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A group of fisherman cleaning lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush) at Lake Pend Oreille, Idaho.

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A group of fisherman cleaning lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush) at Lake Pend Oreille, Idaho.

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Bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) caught in fishing nets in Lake Pend Oreille, Idaho. (IUCN: Vulnerable; US: Federally threatened)

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A biologist holds a bat that was killed by a wind turbine on a wind farm in southwest Pennsylvania. Biologists calculate that an average of 32 bats and nearly 5 birds are killed per turbine per season here, having a deadly effect on migrating wildlife.

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One turbine’s deadly harvest: biologists calculate that on average, 32 bats and five birds are killed in one season by each turbine on this wind farm in southwest Pennsylvania. Big birds aren’t immune, as this red-tailed hawk (Buteo jamaicensis) shows.

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A road-killed bobcat (Lynx rufus) that has been placed along a highway near the Santa Anna NWR. USFWS biologists are conducting a study to determine how often passers will to pick up and take a dead bobcat, which often is just a few minutes. This may be skewing biologist’s road kill statistics.

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Aerials of the world’s largest wind farm near Abilene, TX. The farm spreads out over 47,000 acres in Nolan and Taylor Counties in Texas. There are more than 500 turbines in this development, which sprawls over farmland, pasture and mesquite and juniper scrub. Environmentalists are quite concerned that wind turbines are killing increasing numbers of migrating bats and birds.

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Aerials of the world’s largest wind farm near Abilene, TX. The farm spreads out over 47,000 acres in Nolan and Taylor Counties in Texas. There are more than 500 turbines in this development, which sprawls over farmland, pasture and mesquite and juniper scrub. Environmentalists are quite concerned that wind turbines are killing increasing numbers of migrating bats and birds.

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Aerials of the world’s largest wind farm near Abilene, TX. The farm spreads out over 47,000 acres in Nolan and Taylor Counties in Texas. There are more than 500 turbines in this development, which sprawls over farmland, pasture and mesquite and juniper scrub. Environmentalists are quite concerned that wind turbines are killing increasing numbers of migrating bats and birds.

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Cowbirds (Molothrus sp.) that were caught in traps set for them at Fort Hood Army Base near Kileen, TX. Of these cowbirds, the females will be killed and the males will be kept to lure other birds. The eradication of cowbirds has been going on for awhile here in an effort to study the effect of their parasitism on endangered birds like the black-capped vireo and golden-cheeked warbler.

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Crude oil from the Deepwater Horizon spill coats marshes on a barrier island in Barataria Bay, Louisiana. Once oiled this heavily, marsh grasses will die.

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Crude oil from the Deepwater Horizon spill coats marshes on a barrier island in Barataria Bay, Louisiana. Once oiled this heavily, marsh grasses will die.

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Hundreds of pipeline canals and shipping lanes have been cut into the coastal marshes of Louisiana. Each one allows more saltwater to intrude from the Gulf, killing the marsh and allowing more oil to penetrate from the Deepwater Horizon spill.

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Aerial of the marshlands that have literally been cut to pieces by pipeline canals and shipping channels that have been put in by the oil industry over the years. Such huge canals have allowed saltwater to intrude, killing off the marsh and eliminating its resistance to catastrophic events in the Gulf such as storms, and now, oil spills like the Deepwater Horizon.

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A failed boom lies washed up in a marsh, showing the effects of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill.

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A dead sea turtle floating in an oil slick from the Deepwater Horizon spill, in Barataria Bay, Louisiana.

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A USFWS employee, stands over a calf that was killed by a wolf pack near Red Deer, MT. Wolves very seldom kill cattle. Defenders of Wildlife actually reimburses ranchers for any cattle loss to wolves in Montana.

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A calf that was killed by a wolf pack near Red Deer, MT. Wolves very seldom kill cattle. Defenders of Wildlife actually reimburses ranchers for any cattle loss to wolves in Montana.

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A USFWS employee, stands over a calf that was killed by a wolf pack near Red Deer, MT. Wolves very seldom kill cattle. Defenders of Wildlife actually reimburses ranchers for any cattle loss to wolves in Montana.

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Pronghorn antelope hunting in the Charles M. Russell NWR in Montana.

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Pronghorn antelope hunting in the Charles M. Russell NWR in Montana.

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Managers at the Attwater Prairie Chicken NWR must use controlled fire to kill invasive woody species and keep the prairie healthy.

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White tailed-hawks are normal parts of the prairie ecosystem, but when shrinking habitat leaves endangered birds like the Attwater’s prairie chicken no place to hide, predation becomes a problem. The McCartney rose bush underneath its nest is a woody, exotic species that threatens the prairie itself.

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A Cooper’s hawk feeds on a male Attwater’s prairie-chicken it killed on a lek near Texas City, TX. Birds of prey are avital part of a healthy ecosystem, but since APC’s habitat has shrunk to a few small patches of prairie, hawks pose a substantial risk to the endangered bird.

Photo: Julie Jensen Director of Marketing | WVC O: 866.800.7326 | D: 702.443.9249 | E: j.jensen@wvc.org

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