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A local resident draws a laugh from her daughter by donning the head of a musk ox (Ovibos moschatus) recently shot by her husband. Sport hunters are allowed to kill approximately 70 of these animals, once extinct in Alaska, per year.

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Bush meat shoppers pay to have the fur singed off a drill monkey in Malabo on Bioko island, Equatorial Guinea.

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A researcher from the Texas Marine Mammal Stranding Network photographs dead bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) washed up from the Gulf of Mexico in a research effort to determine what killed the animals.

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A western cottonmouth snake (Agkistrodon piscivorous) lies on the Snake Road, near Ware, Illinois. This three mile stretch of road along the is closed to traffic when the snakes are migrating from limestone cliffs to the swamp nearby.

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A western cottonmouth (Agkistrodon piscivorous) snake lies dead on the Clear Creek Levy Road, near Ware, Illinois. Road kills are one of the leading causes of death for snakes in the U.S.

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A biologist holds a bat that was killed by a wind turbine on a wind farm in southwest Pennsylvania. Biologists calculate that an average of 32 bats and nearly 5 birds are killed per turbine per season here, having a deadly effect on migrating wildlife.

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One turbine’s deadly harvest: biologists calculate that on average, 32 bats and five birds are killed in one season by each turbine on this wind farm in southwest Pennsylvania. Big birds aren’t immune, as this red-tailed hawk (Buteo jamaicensis) shows.

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A road-killed bobcat (Lynx rufus) that has been placed along a highway near the Santa Anna NWR. USFWS biologists are conducting a study to determine how often passers will to pick up and take a dead bobcat, which often is just a few minutes. This may be skewing biologist’s road kill statistics.

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Recently killed introduced (non-native) trout in the Sixty Lake Basin of King’s Canyon National Park, Nevada.

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Recently killed introduced trout in the Sixty Lake Basin of King’s Canyon National Park, Nevada.

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A biologist working for the National Parks Service collects introduced (non-native) trout at the Sixty Lake Basin of King’s Canyon National Park, Nevada.

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Recently killed introduced (non-native) trout in the Sixty Lake Basin of King’s Canyon National Park, Nevada.

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A dead grizzly bear (Ursus arctos horribilis) on a riverbank probably died from fighting another.

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A dead eastern cottontail rabbit (Sylvilagus floridanus), most likely killed by a domestic housecat.

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A dead eastern cottontail rabbit (Sylvilagus floridanus), most likely killed by a domestic housecat.

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White tailed-hawks are normal parts of the prairie ecosystem, but when shrinking habitat leaves endangered birds like the Attwater’s prairie chicken no place to hide, predation becomes a problem. The McCartney rose bush underneath its nest is a woody, exotic species that threatens the prairie itself.

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A Cooper’s hawk feeds on a male Attwater’s prairie-chicken it killed on a lek near Texas City, TX. Birds of prey are avital part of a healthy ecosystem, but since APC’s habitat has shrunk to a few small patches of prairie, hawks pose a substantial risk to the endangered bird.

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Shorebirds killed by a collision with power lines at Prudhoe Bay oil field on Alaska’s North Slope.

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Close-up of an endangered male Attwater’s prairie- chicken,killed by a Cooper’s hawk. Predation is a normal part of healthy ecosystems, but shrinking habitat creates a problem when birds like the APC have no place to hide.

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This Attwater’s prairie chicken wasn’t strong enough to free itself from its egg at the Fossil Rim Wildlife Center. Biologists must let nature take its course to keep the population as strong as possible.

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A female Attwater’s prairie chicken (endangered) telescopesher head above the grass as she moves out of the pen and into the wild coastal prairie. She and her chicks were killed by predators less than two weeks later.

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Predators have coexisted for centuries with the Attwater’s prairie-chicken. In recent decades, shrinking habitat has left the grouse nowhere to hide, making predation a significant problem.

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A female Attwater’s prairie chicken sits on her clutch of eggs at a captive breeding pen at the Fossil Rim Wildlife Center.

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A captive-born mother and chick wait in the safety of a pre-release pen. Once they ventured out into the wild, however, the mother was killed within two weeks by a raptor.

Photo: Julie Jensen Director of Marketing | WVC O: 866.800.7326 | D: 702.443.9249 | E: j.jensen@wvc.org

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