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Bess beetles, also known as patent leather beetles (Odontotaenius disjunctus) at the University of Nebraska’s entomology lab.

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Bess beetles, also known as patent leather beetles (Odontotaenius disjunctus) at the University of Nebraska’s entomology lab.

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Bess beetles, also known as patent leather beetles (Odontotaenius disjunctus) at the University of Nebraska’s entomology lab.

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Bess beetles, also known as patent leather beetles (Odontotaenius disjunctus) at the University of Nebraska’s entomology lab.

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Bess beetles, also known as patent leather beetles (Odontotaenius disjunctus) at the University of Nebraska’s entomology lab.

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Bess beetles, also known as patent leather beetles (Odontotaenius disjunctus) at the University of Nebraska’s entomology lab.

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Bess beetles, also known as patent leather beetles (Odontotaenius disjunctus) at the University of Nebraska’s entomology lab.

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A dog looks eagerly upon a dead pheasant after an organized hunting event in Broken Bow, Nebraska

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A dog participates in an organized pheasant hunt in Broken Bow, Nebraska.

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Hunters participate in an organized pheasant hunt in Broken Bow, Nebraska.

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Hunters participate in an organized pheasant hunt in Broken Bow, Nebraska.

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Associate curators of amphibians at the Detroit Zoo, as they watch over the Wyoming toad breeding facility.

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Associate curators of amphibians at the Detroit Zoo, as they watch over the Wyoming toad breeding facility.

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Associate curators of amphibians at the Detroit Zoo, as they watch over the Wyoming toad breeding facility.

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Associate curator of amphibians at the Detroit Zoo, as she watches over the Wyoming toad breeding facility.

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Associate curator of amphibians at the Detroit Zoo, as she watches over the Wyoming toad breeding facility.

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A tiger beetle larvae (species unknown) in a lab at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln.

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Cream-edged tiger beetle (Cicindela circumpicta) in a lab at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln.

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Cream-edged tiger beetle (Cicindela circumpicta) in a lab at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln.

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Cream-edged tiger beetle (Cicindela circumpicta) in a lab at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln.

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Cream-edged tiger beetle (Cicindela circumpicta) in a lab at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln.

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Cream-edged tiger beetle (Cicindela circumpicta) in a lab at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln.

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Cream-edged tiger beetle (Cicindela circumpicta) in a lab at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln.

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A ground beetle larvae (Dicaelus sp.) in a lab at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln.

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A ground beetle larvae (Dicaelus sp.) in a lab at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln.

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A ground beetle larvae (Dicaelus sp.) in a lab at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln.

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A domestic rat at the George M. Sutton Avian Research Center.

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A domestic rat at the George M. Sutton Avian Research Center.

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A domestic rat at the George M. Sutton Avian Research Center.

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A domestic rat at the George M. Sutton Avian Research Center.

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A domestic rat at the George M. Sutton Avian Research Center.

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Domestic rats (Rattus norvegicus) at the Sutton Avian Research Center.

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A domestic rat at the George M. Sutton Avian Research Center.

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Domestic rats (Rattus norvegicus) at the Sutton Avian Research Center.

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For fear she and her pack might harm cattle, Opal was captured and collared by USFWS workers. She was then released as a “Judas wolf” — once she lead the workers back to her pack, they were all exterminated.

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For fear she and her pack might harm cattle, Opal was captured and collared by USFWS workers. She was then released as a “Judas wolf” — once she lead the workers back to her pack, they were all exterminated.

Photo: Julie Jensen Director of Marketing | WVC O: 866.800.7326 | D: 702.443.9249 | E: j.jensen@wvc.org

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