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ANI040-00326

An endangered Hatinh langur (Trachypithecus hatinhensi) at the Endangered Primate Rescue Center in Cuc Phuong National Park, Vietnam. This animal’s name is Kurt. He was a confiscation. He was born in 1995.

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ANI040-00325

An endangered Hatinh langur (Trachypithecus hatinhensi) at the Endangered Primate Rescue Center in Cuc Phuong National Park, Vietnam.

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ANI040-00324

An endangered Hatinh langur (Trachypithecus hatinhensi) at the Endangered Primate Rescue Center in Cuc Phuong National Park, Vietnam.

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ANI040-00323

An endangered Hatinh langur (Trachypithecus hatinhensi) at the Endangered Primate Rescue Center in Cuc Phuong National Park, Vietnam.

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ANI040-00322

An endangered Hatinh langur (Trachypithecus hatinhensi) at the Endangered Primate Rescue Center in Cuc Phuong National Park, Vietnam.

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ANI040-00318

“Luna”, a hand-raised, 56-day-old red-shanked douc langur (Pygathrix Pygathrix) at the Endangered Primate Rescue Center in Cuc Phuong National Park, Vietnam. Endangered (IUCN) and federally endangered.

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ANI040-00317

“Luna”, a hand-raised, 56-day-old red-shanked douc langur (Pygathrix nemaeus) at the Endangered Primate Rescue Center in Cuc Phuong National Park, Vietnam. Critically endangered (IUCN) and federally endangered.

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ANI040-00316

“Luna”, a hand-raised, 56-day-old red-shanked douc langur (Pygathrix nemaeus) at the Endangered Primate Rescue Center in Cuc Phuong National Park, Vietnam. Critically endangered (IUCN) and federally endangered.

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ANI099-00068

Capped langur (Trachypithecus pileatus) at the Assam State Zoo in Guwahati, Assam, India.

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ANI099-00067

Capped langur (Trachypithecus pileatus) at the Assam State Zoo in Guwahati, Assam, India.

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ANI040-00307

Spectacled langur, or dusky leaf monkey (Trachypithecus obscurus) at the Dallas Zoo. Rama is a male, born in 2000. He loves to eat honeysuckle, corn, oatmeal, grapes and bananas. He’s sort of aggressive, dominant, and has to be the boss. His name means ‘God of the monkeys’ and he always wants to be the center of attention, his keepers say. There are only 15 of this species in U.S. Zoos, and fewer than 70 globally. Many of the captive animals are closely related, so U.S. zoos aren’t breeding them anymore.

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ANI040-00306

Endangered (IUCN) and federally endangered Francois’ langurs (Trachypithecus francoisi) at Omaha Henry Doorly Zoo. This species exhibits ‘aunting’ behavior, meaning several females will take care of the same baby. The bright orange coloration (which disappears by age six months) is thought to allow for easy tracking of the young one no matter which surrogate mom has it at any time.

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ANI040-00299

An endangered (IUCN) and federally endangered Francois’ langur (Trachypithecus francoisi) at the Kansas City Zoo.

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ANI040-00300

An endangered (IUCN) and federally endangered Francois’ langur (Trachypithecus francoisi) at the Kansas City Zoo.

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ANI040-00301

An endangered (IUCN) and federally endangered Francois’ langur (Trachypithecus francoisi) at the Kansas City Zoo.

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ANI040-00294

A federally endangered Northern plains gray langur (Semnopithecus entellus) at the Chattanooga Zoo.

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ANI040-00236

Endangered (IUCN) and federally endangered Francois’ langurs (Trachypithecus francoisi) at the Omaha Zoo. These monkeys are good jumpers. When they’re born, they’re bright orange for the first three or four months. They’re also good at ‘aunting’, meaning various females care for other’s babies.

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ANI040-00235

A pair of endangered (IUCN) and federally endangered Francois’ langurs (Trachypithecus francoisi) at the Omaha Zoo.

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ANI040-00219

An endangered (IUCN) and federally endangered Franois langur (Trachypithecus francoisi) at the Kansas City Zoo.

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ANI040-00213

Endangered (IUCN) and federally endangered Francois langurs (Trachypithecus francoisi) at the Omaha Zoo.These monkeys are good jumpers. When they’re born, they’re bright orange for the first three or four months. They’re also good at ‘aunting’, meaning various females care for other’s babies.

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ANI040-00214

Endangered (IUCN) and federally endangered Francois langurs (Trachypithecus francoisi) at the Omaha Zoo.These monkeys are good jumpers. When they’re born, they’re bright orange for the first three or four months. They’re also good at ‘aunting’, meaning various females care for other’s babies.

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ANI040-00215

Endangered (IUCN) and federally endangered Francois langurs (Trachypithecus francoisi) at the Omaha Zoo.These monkeys are good jumpers. When they’re born, they’re bright orange for the first three or four months. They’re also good at ‘aunting’, meaning various females care for other’s babies.

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ANI040-00188

A federally endangered Northern plains gray langur (Semnopithecus entellus) at the Chattanooga Zoo.

Photo: Julie Jensen Director of Marketing | WVC O: 866.800.7326 | D: 702.443.9249 | E: j.jensen@wvc.org

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