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Cardinal tetra (Paracheirodon axelrodi) at the Dallas World Aquarium.

This fish species is endemic to the Rio Negro River in Brazil, the second-largest tributary of the Amazon.

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Red-eyed fruit flies (Drosophila melanogaster) at the Urban Entomology Lab at the University of Florida at Gainesville.

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Yellow Fever mosquitos (Aedes aegypti) at the Urban Entomology Lab at the University of Florida at Gainesville.

This species carries both yellow fever and zika, and is responsible for more human deaths each year than any other animal on the planet.

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Yellow Fever mosquitos (Aedes aegypti) at the Urban Entomology Lab at the University of Florida at Gainesville.

This species carries both yellow fever and zika, and is responsible for more human deaths each year than any other animal on the planet.

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Yellow Fever mosquitos (Aedes aegypti) at the Urban Entomology Lab at the University of Florida at Gainesville.

This species carries both yellow fever and zika, and is responsible for more human deaths each year than any other animal on the planet.

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Ghost ants (Tapinoma melanocephalum) tend to their brood (larvae and pupae) at the Urban Entomology Lab at the University of Florida in Gainesville.

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Bicolored trailing ants (Monomorium floricola) at the Urban Entomology Lab at the University of Florida at Gainesville.

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Bicolored trailing ants (Monomorium floricola) at the Urban Entomology Lab at the University of Florida at Gainesville.

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A crowd gathers to watch the Photo Ark shoot inside the reptile house at the Assam State Zoo in Guwahati, Assam, India.

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Children sit patiently for an Easter egg hunt at a house in Lincoln, Nebraska.

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A cage full of red-lored Amazon parrots (Amazona autumnalis) which survived Hurricane Andrew; only two were lost in the storm.

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One turbine’s deadly harvest: biologists calculate that on average, 32 bats and five birds are killed in one season by each turbine on this wind farm in southwest Pennsylvania. Big birds aren’t immune, as this red-tailed hawk (Buteo jamaicensis) shows.

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Mexican free-tailed bats (Tadarida brasiliensis) swirl out of the Eckert James River Bat Cave at sunset to feed on insects. This maternity colony builds to more than 6 million bats in late July, making it one of the largest in the world. It is owned and managed by The Nature Conservancy.

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Mexican free-tailed bats (Tadarida brasiliensis) swirl out of the Eckert James River Bat Cave at sunset to feed on insects. This maternity colony builds to more than 6 million bats in late July, making it one of the largest in the world. It is owned and managed by The Nature Conservancy.

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Aerials of the world’s largest wind farm near Abilene, TX. The farm spreads out over 47,000 acres in Nolan and Taylor Counties in Texas. There are more than 500 turbines in this development, which sprawls over farmland, pasture and mesquite and juniper scrub. Environmentalists are quite concerned that wind turbines are killing increasing numbers of migrating bats and birds.

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Aerials of the world’s largest wind farm near Abilene, TX. The farm spreads out over 47,000 acres in Nolan and Taylor Counties in Texas. There are more than 500 turbines in this development, which sprawls over farmland, pasture and mesquite and juniper scrub. Environmentalists are quite concerned that wind turbines are killing increasing numbers of migrating bats and birds.

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Aerials of the world’s largest wind farm near Abilene, TX. The farm spreads out over 47,000 acres in Nolan and Taylor Counties in Texas. There are more than 500 turbines in this development, which sprawls over farmland, pasture and mesquite and juniper scrub. Environmentalists are quite concerned that wind turbines are killing increasing numbers of migrating bats and birds.

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Cowbirds (Molothrus sp.) that were caught in traps set for them at Fort Hood Army Base near Kileen, TX. Of these cowbirds, the females will be killed and the males will be kept to lure other birds. The eradication of cowbirds has been going on for awhile here in an effort to study the effect of their parasitism on endangered birds like the black-capped vireo and golden-cheeked warbler.

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A group of concerned local residents meet at a community outreach event on Dauphin Island, Alabama.

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White pelicans (Pelecanus erythrorhynchos) at the Texas City Preserve near Texas City, Texas.

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Birdwatchers carry cameras at Rowe Audubon Sanctuary in Nebraska.

Photo: Julie Jensen Director of Marketing | WVC O: 866.800.7326 | D: 702.443.9249 | E: j.jensen@wvc.org

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