Photo

PEO011-00014

Rafts made of mahogany are smuggled out of Madidi National Park on the Tuichi River (Bolivia.) Groups like EcoBolivia work to educate the locals on the real value of their land in hopes of preventing logging and deforestation.

Photo

PEO011-00015

Rafts made of mahogany are smuggled out of Madidi National Park on the Tuichi River (Bolivia.) Groups like EcoBolivia work to educate the locals on the real value of their land in hopes of preventing logging and deforestation.

Photo

ENV001-00157

Logs from old growth forest on Vancouver Island, BC, are prepared and loaded for transport.

Photo

ENV001-00154

Helicopters are used to selectively log old-growth forest along Clayoquot Sound on Vancouver Island (British Columbia, Canada.)

Photo

ENV001-00155

Helicopters are used to selectively log old-growth forest along Clayoquot Sound on Vancouver Island (British Columbia, Canada.)

Photo

ENV001-00153

Helicopters are used to selectively log old-growth forest along Clayoquot Sound on Vancouver Island (British Columbia, Canada.)

Photo

ENV001-00152

Helicopters are used to selectively log old-growth forest along Clayoquot Sound on Vancouver Island (British Columbia, Canada.)

Photo

ENV001-00149

Piquia fruit (a forest product), waiting to go to market inBrazil.

Photo

ENV001-00150

A Brazilian boy paddles a canoe to market. His family saved their forest by harvesting and selling its produce.

Photo

ENV001-00148

Helicopters are used to selectively log old-growth forest along Clayoquot Sound on Vancouver Island (British Columbia, Canada.)

Photo

ENV001-00146

Osage orange tree stumps on a farmstead being cleared for development in Lincoln, NE.

Photo

ENV001-00145

Osage orange tree stumps on a farmstead being cleared for development in Lincoln, NE.

Photo

ENV001-00104

Casava plant roots are processed into farinha, a staple in the Amazonian diet. Cassava is often planted in clear-cut areas, and its processing is far more labor-intensive than harvesting forest fruits.

Photo

ENV001-00103

Casava plant roots are processed into farinha, a staple in the Amazonian diet. Cassava is often planted in clear-cut areas, and its processing is far more labor-intensive than harvesting forest fruits.

Photo

ENV001-00102

Desertification and black vultures are all that remain in aclear cut area of the Brazilian Amazon. This spot used to be a thriving rainforest.

Photo

ENV001-00101

Cattle graze in a clear-cut area of the Brazilian Amazon’s rain forest.

Photo

ENV001-00100

Grasshoppers flock to a clearcut section of rain forest in the Brazilian Amazon.

Photo

ENV001-00099

A virgin rainforest is clear-cut, and cassava is planted inthe poor soil. (Brazilian Amazon.)

Photo

ENV001-00042

Mountains of sawdust outside a sawmill in Paragominas, Brazil in the Brazilian Amazon.

Photo

ENV001-00043

Mountains of sawdust outside a sawmill in Paragominas, Brazil along the Brazilian Amazon.

Photo

ENV001-00041

Old growth forest logs stacked and waiting for sale along the Capim River, a tributary of the Brazilian Amazon.

Photo

ENV001-00039

Old growth forest logs stacked and waiting for sale along the Capim River, a tributary of the Brazilian Amazon.

Photo

ENV001-00040

Old growth forest logs stacked and waiting for sale along the Capim River, a tributary of the Brazilian Amazon.

Photo

ENV001-00038

Cutting down old-growth osage orange trees in Nebraska.

Photo

ENV001-00036

Cutting down old-growth osage orange trees in Nebraska.

Photo

ENV001-00037

Cutting down old-growth osage orange trees in Nebraska.

Photo

ENV001-00035

Cutting down old-growth osage orange trees in Nebraska.

Photo

ENV001-00034

Cutting down old-growth osage orange trees in Nebraska.

Photo

ENV001-00032

Cutting down old-growth osage orange trees in Nebraska.

Photo

ENV001-00033

Cutting down old-growth osage orange trees in Nebraska.

Photo

ENV001-00029

Clear-cutting in the Olympic National Forest, Washington.

Photo

ENV001-00030

Clear-cutting in the Olympic National Forest, Washington.

Photo

ENV001-00028

Clear-cutting in the Olympic National Forest, Washington.

Photo: Julie Jensen Director of Marketing | WVC O: 866.800.7326 | D: 702.443.9249 | E: j.jensen@wvc.org

Speaking Engagements

Joel is a popular keynote speaker with conservation, corporate, and civic groups.

Hire him to entertain and inspire your audience.

Book Joel To Speak

The Photo Ark

Joel is the founder of the Photo Ark, a groundbreaking effort to document every species in captivity before it’s too late.

Explore the Photo Ark

Visit Our Store

Every purchase goes directly to support our mission: getting the public to care and helping to save species from extinction.

Help Us Build the Ark