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A pair of pallid foxes (Vulpes pallida) at Cub Creek Science Camp in Rolla, MO. The female in the front is named Pallida and the male in the back in named Gadget.

This species of fox comes from Sub-Saharan Africa. Their large ears not only assist with hearing prey and threats, but serve to regulate their body temperature.

Cub Creek Science Camp is a residential animal and science summer camp located in central Missouri. Here children from all over the world come to learn about the Earth’s creatures and to gain an appreciation for science and nature.

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A male field cricket (Gryllus assimilis) at Centro Jambatu in Quito, Ecuador. Crickets are used to feed amphibians and other animals.

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A pair of El Tambo marsupial frogs (Gastrotheca elicioi) at Centro Jambatu in Quito, Ecuador. These animals were originally from Ona, Ecuador. Locality is Loja, Ecuador. The male is bronze with some green, and the female is bright green and much larger, with pouch on back for brooding young.

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A male El Tambo marsupial frog (Gastrotheca elicioi) at Centro Jambatu in Quito, Ecuador. This animal was originally from Ona, Ecuador. Locality is Loja, Ecuador.

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A male, endangered, elegant stubfoot toad (Atelopus elegans) at Centro Jambatu in Quito, Ecuador. This is one of the few species of Atelopus not threatened by chytrid fungus because it lives at lower elevations in warmer climates.

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A male, endangered, elegant stubfoot toad (Atelopus elegans) at Centro Jambatu in Quito, Ecuador. This is one of the few species of Atelopus not threatened by chytrid fungus because it lives at lower elevations in warmer climates.

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A female and a male Festa’s toad (Rhinella festae) at Centro Jambatu in Quito, Ecuador. This animal is originally from Loreto, Orellana Province, Ecuador. The biggest threats to this species are deforestation, agriculture, mining, urban development, and use of pesticides.

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A male turtle carapaced marsupial frog (Gastrotheca testudinea) at Centro Jambatu in Quito, Ecuador. This animal is originally from Zunag, Morona Santiago Province, Ecuador.

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A male turtle carapaced marsupial frog (Gastrotheca testudinea) at Centro Jambatu in Quito, Ecuador. This animal is originally from Zunag, Morona Santiago Province, Ecuador.

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An endangered male gray-bellied marsupial frog (Gastrotheca litonedis) at Centro Jambatu in Quito, Ecuador. This animal is originally from Busa Lagoon, Azuay Province, Ecuador. This species is threatened by habitat loss.

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A male Lojana marsupial frog (Gastrotheca lojana) at Centro Jambatu in Quito, Ecuador. This animal is originally from Ona, Azuay Province, Ecuador.

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A male Lojana marsupial frog (Gastrotheca lojana) at Centro Jambatu in Quito, Ecuador. This animal is originally from Ona, Azuay Province, Ecuador.

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A pair of painted tree frogs (Boana picturata) in amplexus at Centro Jambatu in Quito, Ecuador. These animals are originally from the Reserva Otokiki – Alto Tambo, Esmeraldas Province, Ecuador. The species experiences habitat loss due to mining, deforestation road constructions, farm activities, agriculture, mining and urban development.

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A pair of painted tree frogs (Boana picturata) in amplexus at Centro Jambatu in Quito, Ecuador. These animals are originally from the Reserva Otokiki – Alto Tambo, Esmeraldas Province, Ecuador. The species experiences habitat loss due to mining, deforestation road constructions, farm activities, agriculture, mining and urban development.

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Two critically endangered Limon harlequin frogs (Atelopus sp. spumarius complex) in amplexus at Centro Jambatu in Quito, Ecuador. These two animals were originally from San Carlos de Limón, Morona Santiago Province, Ecuador. The captive breeding program has been successful in Centro Jambatu, saving the species from the extinction. The natural habitat of this species faces numerous obstacles, including loss due to mining, deforestation road constructions and farming activities.

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A male critically endangered Rio Pescado stubfoot toad (Atelopus balios) at Centro Jambatu in Quito, Ecuador.

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A male critically endangered Rio Pescado stubfoot toad (Atelopus balios) at Centro Jambatu in Quito, Ecuador.

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A male and a female critically endangered Rio Pescado stubfoot toads (Atelopus balios) in amplexus at Centro Jambatu in Quito, Ecuador.

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A male guiña (Leopardus guigna guigna) from Fauna Andina in central-south, Chile.

He has only three legs, having lost one in a trapper’s snare. He was brought here to be taken care of by the Chilean Wildlife Authority.

Despite the loss of his front leg, he moves around well and has a good life here at Fauna Andina, a wildlife conservation and research center in Chile. Their goal is to protect wildlife through study and, captive breeding and release back into the wild.

The guiña has the smallest distribution of any wild cat on the planet. This makes it very susceptible to being endangered.

The Fauna Andina conservation center near is the only known center that’s ever bred this species in captivity.

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A male guiña (Leopardus guigna guigna) from Fauna Andina in central-south Chile.

He has only three legs, having lost one in a trapper’s snare. He was brought here to be taken care of by the Chilean Wildlife Authority.

Despite the loss of his front leg, he moves around well and has a good life here at Fauna Andina, a wildlife conservation and research center in Chile. Their goal is to protect wildlife through study and, captive breeding and release back into the wild.

The guiña has the smallest distribution of any wild cat on the planet. This makes it very susceptible to being endangered.

The Fauna Andina conservation center near is the only known center that’s ever bred this species in captivity.

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A male guiña (Leopardus guigna guigna) from Fauna Andina in central-south, Chile.

He has only three legs, having lost one in a trapper’s snare. He was brought here to be taken care of by the Chilean Wildlife Authority.

Despite the loss of his front leg, he moves around well and has a good life here at Fauna Andina, a wildlife conservation and research center in Chile. Their goal is to protect wildlife through study and, captive breeding and release back into the wild.

The guiña has the smallest distribution of any wild cat on the planet. This makes it very susceptible to being endangered.

The Fauna Andina conservation center near is the only known center that’s ever bred this species in captivity.

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A male guiña (Leopardus guigna guigna) from Fauna Andina in central-south, Chile.

He has only three legs, having lost one in a trapper’s snare. He was brought here to be taken care of by the Chilean Wildlife Authority.

Despite the loss of his front leg, he moves around well and has a good life here at Fauna Andina, a wildlife conservation and research center in Chile. Their goal is to protect wildlife through study and, captive breeding and release back into the wild.

The guiña has the smallest distribution of any wild cat on the planet. This makes it very susceptible to being endangered.

The Fauna Andina conservation center near is the only known center that’s ever bred this species in captivity.

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A male guiña (Leopardus guigna guigna) from Fauna Andina in central-south, Chile.

He has only three legs, having lost one in a trapper’s snare. He was brought here to be taken care of by the Chilean Wildlife Authority.

Despite the loss of his front leg, he moves around well and has a good life here at Fauna Andina, a wildlife conservation and research center in Chile. Their goal is to protect wildlife through study and, captive breeding and release back into the wild.

The guiña has the smallest distribution of any wild cat on the planet. This makes it very susceptible to being endangered.

The Fauna Andina conservation center near is the only known center that’s ever bred this species in captivity.

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A male guiña (Leopardus guigna guigna) from Fauna Andina in central-south, Chile.

He has only three legs, having lost one in a trapper’s snare. He was brought here to be taken care of by the Chilean Wildlife Authority.

Despite the loss of his front leg, he moves around well and has a good life here at Fauna Andina, a wildlife conservation and research center in Chile. Their goal is to protect wildlife through study and, captive breeding and release back into the wild.

The guiña has the smallest distribution of any wild cat on the planet. This makes it very susceptible to being endangered.

The Fauna Andina conservation center near is the only known center that’s ever bred this species in captivity.

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A male and female critically endangered red-crowned roof turtle (Batagur kachuga) at the Kukrail Gharial and Turtle Rehabilitation Centre in Lucknow, Upper Pradesh, India. The male is one-third the size of the female, and there are less than 500 breeding adult animals left in the wild.

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A vulnerable, male Dakota skipper (Hesperia dacotae) at the Minnesota Zoo.
This once thriving butterfly species, has spiraled into a steep decline due to dwindling prairie habitats.

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A male red kangaroo (Macropus rufus) named Irwin at the Palm Beach Zoo.

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A male transcaspian urial (Ovis vignei arkal) at Tierpark Berlin. This species is listed as vulnerable on the IUCN Red List.

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A male transcaspian urial (Ovis vignei arkal) at Tierpark Berlin. This species is listed as vulnerable on the IUCN Red List.

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A male transcaspian urial (Ovis vignei arkal) at Tierpark Berlin. This species is listed as vulnerable on the IUCN Red List.

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A male Marco Polo sheep (Ovis ammon polii) at Tierpark Berlin. This species is listed as near threatened on the IUCN Red List.

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A male Marco Polo sheep (Ovis ammon polii) at Tierpark Berlin. This species is listed as near threatened on the IUCN Red List.

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A male Marco Polo sheep (Ovis ammon polii) at Tierpark Berlin. This species is listed as near threatened on the IUCN Red List.

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A male belted kingfisher (Megaceryle alcyon) at the Wildlife Rehab Center of Minnesota (WRCMN).

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A male belted kingfisher (Megaceryle alcyon) at the Wildlife Rehab Center of Minnesota (WRCMN).

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A male belted kingfisher (Megaceryle alcyon) at the Wildlife Rehab Center of Minnesota (WRCMN).

Photo: Julie Jensen Director of Marketing | WVC O: 866.800.7326 | D: 702.443.9249 | E: j.jensen@wvc.org

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