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A platypus (Ornithorhynchus anatinus) at the Healesville Sanctuary.

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A platypus (Ornithorhynchus anatinus) at the Healesville Sanctuary.

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A platypus (Ornithorhynchus anatinus) at the Healesville Sanctuary.

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A juvenile North American beaver (Castor canadensis) at the WildCare Foundation, a wildlife rehabber in Noble, Oklahoma.

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Fauna Andina

A guina (Leopardus guigna tigriillo) whose name is Pikumche from Fauna Andina in Santiago, Chile. This species is listed as vulnerable on the IUCN red list.

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An endangered golden-headed lion tamarin (Leontopithecus chrysomelas) at the Dallas World Aquarium.

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A golden hamster (Mesocricetus auratus) at the Plzen Zoo in the Czech Republic.

This individual is from wild stock caught along the Syria/Turkey boarder.

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A golden hamster (Mesocricetus auratus) at the Plzen Zoo in the Czech Republic.

This individual is from wild stock caught along the Syria/Turkey boarder.

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A Ganzhorn’s mouse-lemur (Microcebus ganzhorni) at the Plzen Zoo in the Czech Republic.

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A Ganzhorn’s mouse-lemur (Microcebus ganzhorni) at the Plzen Zoo in the Czech Republic.

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A Ganzhorn’s mouse-lemur (Microcebus ganzhorni) at the Plzen Zoo in the Czech Republic.

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A Ganzhorn’s mouse-lemur (Microcebus ganzhorni) at the Plzen Zoo in the Czech Republic.

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A Ganzhorn’s mouse-lemur (Microcebus ganzhorni) at the Plzen Zoo in the Czech Republic.

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A male guiña (Leopardus guigna guigna) from Fauna Andina in central-south, Chile.

He has only three legs, having lost one in a trapper’s snare. He was brought here to be taken care of by the Chilean Wildlife Authority.

Despite the loss of his front leg, he moves around well and has a good life here at Fauna Andina, a wildlife conservation and research center in Chile. Their goal is to protect wildlife through study and, captive breeding and release back into the wild.

The guiña has the smallest distribution of any wild cat on the planet. This makes it very susceptible to being endangered.

The Fauna Andina conservation center near is the only known center that’s ever bred this species in captivity.

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A male guiña (Leopardus guigna guigna) from Fauna Andina in central-south Chile.

He has only three legs, having lost one in a trapper’s snare. He was brought here to be taken care of by the Chilean Wildlife Authority.

Despite the loss of his front leg, he moves around well and has a good life here at Fauna Andina, a wildlife conservation and research center in Chile. Their goal is to protect wildlife through study and, captive breeding and release back into the wild.

The guiña has the smallest distribution of any wild cat on the planet. This makes it very susceptible to being endangered.

The Fauna Andina conservation center near is the only known center that’s ever bred this species in captivity.

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A male guiña (Leopardus guigna guigna) from Fauna Andina in central-south, Chile.

He has only three legs, having lost one in a trapper’s snare. He was brought here to be taken care of by the Chilean Wildlife Authority.

Despite the loss of his front leg, he moves around well and has a good life here at Fauna Andina, a wildlife conservation and research center in Chile. Their goal is to protect wildlife through study and, captive breeding and release back into the wild.

The guiña has the smallest distribution of any wild cat on the planet. This makes it very susceptible to being endangered.

The Fauna Andina conservation center near is the only known center that’s ever bred this species in captivity.

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A male guiña (Leopardus guigna guigna) from Fauna Andina in central-south, Chile.

He has only three legs, having lost one in a trapper’s snare. He was brought here to be taken care of by the Chilean Wildlife Authority.

Despite the loss of his front leg, he moves around well and has a good life here at Fauna Andina, a wildlife conservation and research center in Chile. Their goal is to protect wildlife through study and, captive breeding and release back into the wild.

The guiña has the smallest distribution of any wild cat on the planet. This makes it very susceptible to being endangered.

The Fauna Andina conservation center near is the only known center that’s ever bred this species in captivity.

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A male guiña (Leopardus guigna guigna) from Fauna Andina in central-south, Chile.

He has only three legs, having lost one in a trapper’s snare. He was brought here to be taken care of by the Chilean Wildlife Authority.

Despite the loss of his front leg, he moves around well and has a good life here at Fauna Andina, a wildlife conservation and research center in Chile. Their goal is to protect wildlife through study and, captive breeding and release back into the wild.

The guiña has the smallest distribution of any wild cat on the planet. This makes it very susceptible to being endangered.

The Fauna Andina conservation center near is the only known center that’s ever bred this species in captivity.

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A male guiña (Leopardus guigna guigna) from Fauna Andina in central-south, Chile.

He has only three legs, having lost one in a trapper’s snare. He was brought here to be taken care of by the Chilean Wildlife Authority.

Despite the loss of his front leg, he moves around well and has a good life here at Fauna Andina, a wildlife conservation and research center in Chile. Their goal is to protect wildlife through study and, captive breeding and release back into the wild.

The guiña has the smallest distribution of any wild cat on the planet. This makes it very susceptible to being endangered.

The Fauna Andina conservation center near is the only known center that’s ever bred this species in captivity.

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A guiña (Leopardus guigna tigrillo) whose name is Pikumche from Fauna Andinain central-south, Chile. This species is listed as vulnerable on the IUCN red list.

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A guiña (Leopardus guigna tigrillo) whose name is Pikumche from Fauna Andina in central-south, Chile. This species is listed as vulnerable on the IUCN red list.

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A guiña (Leopardus guigna tigrillo) whose name is Pikumche from Fauna Andina in central-south, Chile. This species is listed as vulnerable on the IUCN red list.

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A guiña (Leopardus guigna tigrillo) whose name is Pikumche from Fauna Andina in central-south, Chile. This species is listed as vulnerable on the IUCN red list.

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A guiña (Leopardus guigna tigrillo) whose name is Pikumche from Fauna Andina in central-south, Chile. This species is listed as vulnerable on the IUCN red list.

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A guina (Leopardus guigna tigrillo) whose name is Pikumche from Fauna Andina in central-south, Chile. This species is listed as vulnerable on the IUCN red list.

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A six-day-old Malayan tapir, Tapirus indicus, at the Minnesota Zoo. This species is listed as endangered (IUCN) and federally endangered.

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An endangered Malayan tiger (Panthera tigris jacksoni) at the Omaha Zoo.

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Pahu, the Bornean rhinoceros (Dicerorhinus sumatrensis harrissoni) at the Sumatran Rhino Rescue Center in Indonesia. This species is listed as critically endangered and the population is in decline.

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Pahu, the Bornean rhinoceros (Dicerorhinus sumatrensis harrissoni) at the Sumatran Rhino Rescue Center in Indonesia. This species is listed as critically endangered and the population is in decline.

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Pahu, the Bornean rhinoceros (Dicerorhinus sumatrensis harrissoni) at the Sumatran Rhino Rescue Center in Indonesia. This species is listed as critically endangered and the population is in decline.

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Pahu, the Bornean rhinoceros (Dicerorhinus sumatrensis harrissoni) at the Sumatran Rhino Rescue Center in Indonesia. This species is listed as critically endangered and the population is in decline.

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A critically endangered sumatran orangutan, Pongo abelii, at the Gladys Porter Zoo in Brownsville, TX.

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A red river hog (Potamochoerus porcus) named Sir Francis Bacon at the Cincinnati Zoo. This was a hand-raised and very friendly program animal. He was hungry the entire time and posed easily as long as the yams didn’t run out.

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A giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) at Zoo Atlanta. This endangered (IUCN) and federally endangered species is native to China.

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A critically endangered and federally endangered, six-week-old female baby gorilla (Gorilla gorilla gorilla) at the Cincinnati Zoo.

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A vulnerable reticulated giraffe (Giraffa camelopardalis reticulata) at Rolling Hills Wildlife Adventure near Salina, Kansas.

Photo: Julie Jensen Director of Marketing | WVC O: 866.800.7326 | D: 702.443.9249 | E: j.jensen@wvc.org

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