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ANI062-00356

A vulnerable adult female white bellied pangolin (Phataginus tricuspis) with her baby, part of Pangolin Conservation, a non-profit organization in Saint Augustine, Florida. This juvenile is only 70 days old. She is the first of her species to be bred in captivity.

Frustratingly, traditional Chinese medicine falsely believes the unique protective keratin scales (the same material as your fingernails) have curative properties. This has resulted in massive illegal taking of pangolins from the wild. With the four species of Asian pangolins becoming endangered, smugglers are now turning their attention to the four found in Africa, including this species.

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ANI062-00357

A vulnerable adult female white bellied pangolin (Phataginus tricuspis) with her baby, part of Pangolin Conservation, a non-profit organization in Saint Augustine, Florida. This juvenile is only 70 days old. She is the first of her species to be bred in captivity.

Frustratingly, traditional Chinese medicine falsely believes the unique protective keratin scales (the same material as your fingernails) have curative properties. This has resulted in massive illegal taking of pangolins from the wild. With the four species of Asian pangolins becoming endangered, smugglers are now turning their attention to the four found in Africa, including this species.

Photo

ANI062-00358

A vulnerable adult female white bellied pangolin (Phataginus tricuspis) with her baby, part of Pangolin Conservation, a non-profit organization in Saint Augustine, Florida. This juvenile is only 70 days old. She is the first of her species to be bred in captivity.

Frustratingly, traditional Chinese medicine falsely believes the unique protective keratin scales (the same material as your fingernails) have curative properties. This has resulted in massive illegal taking of pangolins from the wild. With the four species of Asian pangolins becoming endangered, smugglers are now turning their attention to the four found in Africa, including this species.

Photo

ANI062-00354

A vulnerable adult female white bellied pangolin (Phataginus tricuspis) with her baby, part of Pangolin Conservation, a non-profit organization in Saint Augustine, Florida. This juvenile is only 70 days old. She is the first of her species to be bred in captivity.

Frustratingly, traditional Chinese medicine falsely believes the unique protective keratin scales (the same material as your fingernails) have curative properties. This has resulted in massive illegal taking of pangolins from the wild. With the four species of Asian pangolins becoming endangered, smugglers are now turning their attention to the four found in Africa, including this species.

Photo

ANI062-00355

A vulnerable adult female white bellied pangolin (Phataginus tricuspis) with her baby, part of Pangolin Conservation, a non-profit organization in Saint Augustine, Florida. This juvenile is only 70 days old. She is the first of her species to be bred in captivity.

Frustratingly, traditional Chinese medicine falsely believes the unique protective keratin scales (the same material as your fingernails) have curative properties. This has resulted in massive illegal taking of pangolins from the wild. With the four species of Asian pangolins becoming endangered, smugglers are now turning their attention to the four found in Africa, including this species.

Photo

ANI062-00353

A vulnerable adult female white bellied pangolin (Phataginus tricuspis) with her baby, part of Pangolin Conservation, a non-profit organization in Saint Augustine, Florida. This juvenile is only 70 days old. She is the first of her species to be bred in captivity.

Frustratingly, traditional Chinese medicine falsely believes the unique protective keratin scales (the same material as your fingernails) have curative properties. This has resulted in massive illegal taking of pangolins from the wild. With the four species of Asian pangolins becoming endangered, smugglers are now turning their attention to the four found in Africa, including this species.

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PEO020-00217

Chemotherapy in a labeled bag to be into a patient. The dextrose solution in the foreground will be used to flush the medicine through the vein of a central venous catheter.

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ENV021-00074

A sea turtle that was rescued from the deep water horizon oil spill being rehabilitated at the Audubon Nature Institute in New Orleans, Louisiana.

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ENV021-00069

A sea turtle that was rescued from the deep water horizon oil spill are being rehabilitated at the Audubon Nature Institute in New Orleans, Louisiana.

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ENV021-00037

A media event which allowed the press to film three critically endangered (IUCN) and federally endangered Kemp’s ridley sea turtles (Lepidochelys kempii) which have been brought into the Audubon Nature Institute near New Orleans, Louisiana, after exposure to oil from the Deepwater Horizon spill.

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PEO021-00245

Brian Lehmann gets medicine applied to a hole where his wisdom tooth once was at the Sartore house.

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PEO021-00246

A twelve year-old girl coming out of surgery after getting her tonsils removed.

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PEO019-00347

A twelve year-old girl recovers after surgery to remove her tonsils.

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PEO019-00348

A twelve year-old girl recovers after surgery to remove her tonsils.

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PEO019-00349

A twelve year-old girl recovers after surgery to remove her tonsils.

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PEO019-00350

A twelve year-old girl recovers after surgery to remove her tonsils.

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PEO019-00351

A twelve year-old girl recovers after surgery to remove her tonsils.

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PEO019-00352

A twelve year-old girl recovers after surgery to remove her tonsils.

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PEO001-00138

A Brazilian native shows off native fruits he gathered with his family at Quiandena, a village along the Capim River in the Brazilian Amazon.

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SCE036-00001

A road cuts through the Badger-Two Medicine Area (held by the Blackfeet tribe) in Montana. The area is sacred to the tribe but coal bed methane drilling has begun on the land.

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PEO001-00136

Members of the Blackfeet tribe celebrate their claim on the Badger-Two Medicine Area in Montana, land sacred to them, which has been leased for natural gas development.

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PEO001-00137

Members of the Blackfeet tribe celebrate their claim on the Badger-Two Medicine Area in Montana, land sacred to them, which has been leased for natural gas development.

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ENV001-00097

A medicinal plant from the rain forest is used to heal an infected foot at a forest workshop in Quiandeua, a small village in the Brazilian Amazon.

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ENV001-00095

Gloria, a native Amazonian, leads a workshop on fruits and medicinal plants of the rainforest. She is part of a Brazilian group known as “Women of the Forest”, founded by Americanethnobotanist Patricia Shanley. Their goal is to share withvillagers the many virtues and values of tropical rainforests, from medicinal plants to forest fruits and game.

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ENV001-00096

Gloria, a native Amazonian, leads a workshop on fruits and medicinal plants of the rainforest. She is part of a Brazilian group known as “Women of the Forest”, founded by Americanethnobotanist Patricia Shanley. Their goal is to share withvillagers the many virtues and values of tropical rainforests, from medicinal plants to forest fruits and game.

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ENV001-00094

A medicinal plant from the rain forest is used to heal an infected foot at a workshop in Quiandeua, a small village in the Brazilian Amazon.

Photo: Julie Jensen Director of Marketing | WVC O: 866.800.7326 | D: 702.443.9249 | E: j.jensen@wvc.org

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