Photo

!Monarch Reserve!

Millions of monarch butterflies (Danaus plexippus) roost on the Chincua Mountain near Angangueo, Mexico. This is one of five wintering roosts for monarchs, where the cool mountain climate slows their metabolism enough for them to overwinter before migrating back northward in the spring. Logging threatens this spectacle–Already one of the five sites is no longer used by the butterflies due to the forest being cleared.

Photo

ANI082-000116

Millions of monarch butterflies (Danaus plexippus) roost on the Chincua Mountain near Angangueo, Mexico. This is one of five wintering roosts for monarchs, where the cool mountain climate slows their metabolism enough for them to overwinter before migrating back northward in the spring. Logging threatens this spectacle–Already one of the five sites is no longer used by the butterflies due to the forest being cleared.

Photo

ANI082-00190

A pronghorn antelope sneaks under a barbed wire fence.

Photo

ANI082-00191

A pronghorn antelope, Antilocapra americana, crawls under a fence.

Photo

ANI082-00192

A pronghorn antelope, Antilocapra americana, crossing under a fence near Medicine Hat, Alberta, Canada.

Photo

ANI082-00193

A pronghorn antelope, Antilocapra americana, crossing under a fence near Medicine Hat, Alberta, Canada.

Photo

MIG003-00001

A mountain goat (Oreamnos americanus) stretches to reach a mineral lick in the Walton area of Glacier National Park in Montana. Wonder how this one performed such a death-defying feat? Very carefully. Mountain goats make their living by taking each step very seriously. Using splayed, rubbery hooves that grip rock surfaces, this female started by placing all four feet on the tiny ledge where her back feet are shown in the photo. She then pushed out and wedged into the crevice using her front hooves to bridge the gap, licking any salt on the rocks around her. To get out, she reversed the procedure, again placing all four feet on the same little ledge, turning around slowly until she could exit, uphill and to the left.

Photo

ANI082-00188

A herd of bison (Bison bison) running across the prairie on the Triple U Bison Ranch near Fort Pierre, South Dakota. This ranch has about 2,000 head of bison on over 50,000 acres.

Photo

ANI082-00187

A herd of bison (Bison bison) running across the prairie on the Triple U Bison Ranch near Fort Pierre, South Dakota. This ranch has about 2,000 head of bison on over 50,000 acres.

Photo

COV002-00019

The opening spread for “Great Migrations” from the November, 2010 issue of National Geographic magazine, featuring Joel Sartore’s photograph of bison in South Dakota.

Photo

ANI082-00185

The US-Mexico border wall splits countries and habitat. Animals like this bobcat (Lynx rufus) or its cousin the ocelot, would normally cross the border to hunt or mate. Photograph by Joel Sartore with Mitch Sternberg, Jennifer Lowry, and Naghma Malik, all U.S. Fish and Wildlife Services.

Photo

ANI082-00184

An eastern bluebird (Sialia sialis) near Pleasantdale, Nebraska.

Photo

ANI082-00183

A male Baltimore oriole (Icterus galbula) in Raymond, Nebraska.

Photo

ANI003-00068

Caribou in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, Alaska.

Photo: Julie Jensen Director of Marketing | WVC O: 866.800.7326 | D: 702.443.9249 | E: j.jensen@wvc.org

Speaking Engagements

Joel is a popular keynote speaker with conservation, corporate, and civic groups.

Hire him to entertain and inspire your audience.

Book Joel To Speak

The Photo Ark

Joel is the founder of the Photo Ark, a groundbreaking effort to document every species in captivity before it’s too late.

Explore the Photo Ark

Visit Our Store

Every purchase goes directly to support our mission: getting the public to care and helping to save species from extinction.

Help Us Build the Ark