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A juvenile Florida Keys rat snake (Pantherophis alleghaniensis deckerti) from a private collection.

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A juvenile Florida Keys rat snake (Pantherophis alleghaniensis deckerti) from a private collection.

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A juvenile Florida Keys rat snake (Pantherophis alleghaniensis deckerti) from a private collection.

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A juvenile Florida Keys rat snake (Pantherophis alleghaniensis deckerti) from a private collection.

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BIR065-00226

An endangered thick-billed parrot (Rhynchopsitta pachyrhyncha) at World Bird Sanctuary. This bird’s name is Arizona. He is 22-years-old and was hatched at World Bird Sanctuary. He is an education ambassador here, and is fond of the song ‘Tequila’.

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An endangered thick-billed parrot (Rhynchopsitta pachyrhyncha) at World Bird Sanctuary. This bird’s name is Arizona. He is 22-years-old and was hatched at World Bird Sanctuary. He is an education ambassador here, and is fond of the song ‘Tequila’.

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BIR065-00224

An endangered thick-billed parrot (Rhynchopsitta pachyrhyncha) at World Bird Sanctuary. This bird’s name is Arizona. He is 22-years-old and was hatched at World Bird Sanctuary. He is an education ambassador here, and is fond of the song ‘Tequila’.

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BIR065-00223

An endangered thick-billed parrot (Rhynchopsitta pachyrhyncha) at World Bird Sanctuary. This bird’s name is Arizona. He is 22-years-old and was hatched at World Bird Sanctuary. He is an education ambassador here, and is fond of the song ‘Tequila’.

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BIR064-00189

An American robin (Turdus migratorius migratorius) at Wild Bird Rehabilitation Inc. in St. Louis, Missouri. This bird is either nominate or nigrideus subspecies.

The tail of this bird was pulled off by a cat. Hundreds of millions of birds are killed by house cats in the United States every year

Wild Bird Rehabilitation Inc. is the only songbird rehabilitation center in the state of Missouri. They have been open for 25 years and help rehabilitate over 2,500 wild birds every year.

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BIR064-00188

An American robin (Turdus migratorius migratorius) at Wild Bird Rehabilitation Inc. in St. Louis, Missouri. This bird is either nominate or nigrideus subspecies.

The tail of this bird was pulled off by a cat. Hundreds of millions of birds are killed by house cats in the United States every year

Wild Bird Rehabilitation Inc. is the only songbird rehabilitation center in the state of Missouri. They have been open for 25 years and help rehabilitate over 2,500 wild birds every year.

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BIR064-00187

A Carolina wren (Thryothorus ludovicianus) at Wild Bird Rehabilitation Inc. in St. Louis, Missouri.

This bird was caught in fly paper, a common death trap for songbirds, along with the sticky traps used for mice and insects. It’s important to not use these devices in areas where songbirds are present.

Wild Bird Rehabilitation Inc. is the only songbird rehabilitation center in the state of Missouri. They have been open for 25 years and help rehabilitate over 2,500 wild birds every year.

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An American goldfinch (Spinus tristis tristis) at Wild Bird Rehabilitation Inc. in St. Louis, Missouri.

Wild Bird Rehabilitation Inc. is the only songbird rehabilitation center in the state of Missouri. They have been open for 25 years and help rehabilitate over 2,500 wild birds every year.

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An American goldfinch (Spinus tristis tristis) at Wild Bird Rehabilitation Inc. in St. Louis, Missouri.

Wild Bird Rehabilitation Inc. is the only songbird rehabilitation center in the state of Missouri. They have been open for 25 years and help rehabilitate over 2,500 wild birds every year.

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A cedar waxwing (Bombycilla cedrorum cedrorum) at Wild Bird Rehabilitation Inc. in St. Louis, Missouri.

Wild Bird Rehabilitation Inc. is the only songbird rehabilitation center in the state of Missouri. They have been open for 25 years and help rehabilitate over 2,500 wild birds every year.

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A cedar waxwing (Bombycilla cedrorum cedrorum) at Wild Bird Rehabilitation Inc. in St. Louis, Missouri.

Wild Bird Rehabilitation Inc. is the only songbird rehabilitation center in the state of Missouri. They have been open for 25 years and help rehabilitate over 2,500 wild birds every year.

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A white-throated magpie jay (Calocitta formosa pompata) at Wild Bird Rehabilitation Inc. in St. Louis, Missouri. This bird is from Costa Rica.

Wild Bird Rehabilitation Inc. is the only songbird rehabilitation center in the state of Missouri. They have been open for 25 years and help rehabilitate over 2,500 wild birds every year.

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A white-throated magpie jay (Calocitta formosa pompata) at Wild Bird Rehabilitation Inc. in St. Louis, Missouri. This bird is from Costa Rica.

Wild Bird Rehabilitation Inc. is the only songbird rehabilitation center in the state of Missouri. They have been open for 25 years and help rehabilitate over 2,500 wild birds every year.

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A white-throated magpie jay (Calocitta formosa pompata) at Wild Bird Rehabilitation Inc. in St. Louis, Missouri. This bird is from Costa Rica.

Wild Bird Rehabilitation Inc. is the only songbird rehabilitation center in the state of Missouri. They have been open for 25 years and help rehabilitate over 2,500 wild birds every year.

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A white-throated magpie jay (Calocitta formosa pompata) at Wild Bird Rehabilitation Inc. in St. Louis, Missouri. This bird is from Costa Rica.

Wild Bird Rehabilitation Inc. is the only songbird rehabilitation center in the state of Missouri. They have been open for 25 years and help rehabilitate over 2,500 wild birds every year.

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A male long-crested eagle (Lophaetus occipitalis) at World Bird Sanctuary. His name is Chrys. He was seized at the border by a poacher trying to smuggle him into the States.
Arriving on December 9, 1987, he’s been at the World Bird Sanctuary for more than 30 years—he arrived here in 1987 and is the only known animal of his species in the US.

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A female America golden eagle (Aquila chrysaetos canadensis) at World Bird Sanctuary near St. Louis, MO.
Her name is Kili, which is Lakota for “Awesome”.

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A female America golden eagle (Aquila chrysaetos canadensis) at World Bird Sanctuary near St. Louis, MO.
Her name is Kili, which is Lakota for “Awesome”.

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A male long-crested eagle (Lophaetus occipitalis) at World Bird Sanctuary. His name is Chrys. He was seized at the border by a poacher trying to smuggle him into the States.
Arriving on December 9, 1987, he’s been at the World Bird Sanctuary for more than 30 years—he arrived here in 1987 and is the only known animal of his species in the US.

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A female America golden eagle (Aquila chrysaetos canadensis) at World Bird Sanctuary near St. Louis, MO.
Her name is Kili, which is Lakota for “Awesome”.

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A male long-crested eagle (Lophaetus occipitalis) at World Bird Sanctuary. His name is Chrys. He was seized at the border by a poacher trying to smuggle him into the States.
Arriving on December 9, 1987, he’s been at the World Bird Sanctuary for more than 30 years—he arrived here in 1987 and is the only known animal of his species in the US.

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A male long-crested eagle (Lophaetus occipitalis) at World Bird Sanctuary. His name is Chrys. He was seized at the border by a poacher trying to smuggle him into the States.
Arriving on December 9, 1987, he’s been at the World Bird Sanctuary for more than 30 years—he arrived here in 1987 and is the only known animal of his species in the US.

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A female America golden eagle (Aquila chrysaetos canadensis) at World Bird Sanctuary near St. Louis, MO.
Her name is Kili, which is Lakota for “Awesome”.

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A female America golden eagle (Aquila chrysaetos canadensis) at World Bird Sanctuary near St. Louis, MO.
Her name is Kili, which is Lakota for “Awesome”.

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A male black-throated monitor (Varanus albigularis microstictus) named Vulture, at Cub Creek Science Camp in Rolla, MO. Cub Creek Science Camp is a science summer camp located in central Missouri. Children from all over the world come here to learn about the Earth’s creatures and to gain an appreciation for science and nature.

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A male black-throated monitor (Varanus albigularis microstictus) named Vulture, at Cub Creek Science Camp in Rolla, MO. Cub Creek Science Camp is a science summer camp located in central Missouri. Children from all over the world come here to learn about the Earth’s creatures and to gain an appreciation for science and nature.

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A male black-throated monitor (Varanus albigularis microstictus) named Vulture, at Cub Creek Science Camp in Rolla, MO. Cub Creek Science Camp is a science summer camp located in central Missouri. Children from all over the world come here to learn about the Earth’s creatures and to gain an appreciation for science and nature.

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A male black-throated monitor (Varanus albigularis microstictus) named Vulture, at Cub Creek Science Camp in Rolla, MO. Cub Creek Science Camp is a science summer camp located in central Missouri. Children from all over the world come here to learn about the Earth’s creatures and to gain an appreciation for science and nature.

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A juvenile, critically endangered brush-tailed bettong (Bettongia penicillata) named Bo, at Cub Creek Science Camp in Rolla, MO.

This joey has been out of the pouch for 12 weeks and is about 20-weeks old.

Cub Creek Science Camp is a residential animal and science summer camp located in central Missouri. Here children from all over the world come to learn about the Earth’s creatures and to gain an appreciation for science and nature.

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A pair of pallid foxes (Vulpes pallida) at Cub Creek Science Camp in Rolla, MO. The female on the left is named Pallida and the male on the right in named Gadget.

This species is not well-studied. They come from Sub-Saharan Africa. Their large ears not only assist with hearing prey and threats, but serve to regulate their body temperature.

Cub Creek Science Camp is a residential animal and science summer camp located in central Missouri. Here children from all over the world come to learn about the Earth’s creatures and to gain an appreciation for science and nature.

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A pair of pallid foxes (Vulpes pallida) at Cub Creek Science Camp in Rolla, MO. The female on the left is named Pallida and the male on the right in named Gadget.

This species is not well-studied. They come from Sub-Saharan Africa. Their large ears not only assist with hearing prey and threats, but serve to regulate their body temperature.

Cub Creek Science Camp is a residential animal and science summer camp located in central Missouri. Here children from all over the world come to learn about the Earth’s creatures and to gain an appreciation for science and nature.

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A pair of pallid foxes (Vulpes pallida) at Cub Creek Science Camp in Rolla, MO. The female in the front is named Pallida and the male in the back in named Gadget.

This species of fox comes from Sub-Saharan Africa. Their large ears not only assist with hearing prey and threats, but serve to regulate their body temperature.

Cub Creek Science Camp is a residential animal and science summer camp located in central Missouri. Here children from all over the world come to learn about the Earth’s creatures and to gain an appreciation for science and nature.

Photo: Julie Jensen Director of Marketing | WVC O: 866.800.7326 | D: 702.443.9249 | E: j.jensen@wvc.org

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