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A family works together to change the clothes of their newest family member, a baby girl.

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A family of three, hug and kiss as they sit on a porch swing.

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A mother and father kiss their elementary aged son on his cheeks.

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A family of three, hug and smile as they sit on a porch swing.

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Endangered (IUCN) and federally endangered Francois’ langurs (Trachypithecus francoisi) at Omaha Henry Doorly Zoo. This species exhibits ‘aunting’ behavior, meaning several females will take care of the same baby. The bright orange coloration (which disappears by age six months) is thought to allow for easy tracking of the young one no matter which surrogate mom has it at any time.

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Endangered red ruffed lemurs (Varecia rubra) at the Miller Park Zoo. The mother, named Cassie, is a very attentive mother to her daughter, named Caby-dee. These lemurs live in groups and can be very loud when they all start calling together.

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A family of five pose for a portrait on railroad tracks.

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A vulnerable adult female white bellied pangolin (Phataginus tricuspis) with her baby, part of Pangolin Conservation, a non-profit organization in Saint Augustine, Florida. This juvenile is only 70 days old. She is the first of her species to be bred in captivity.

Frustratingly, traditional Chinese medicine falsely believes the unique protective keratin scales (the same material as your fingernails) have curative properties. This has resulted in massive illegal taking of pangolins from the wild. With the four species of Asian pangolins becoming endangered, smugglers are now turning their attention to the four found in Africa, including this species.

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A vulnerable adult female white bellied pangolin (Phataginus tricuspis) with her baby, part of Pangolin Conservation, a non-profit organization in Saint Augustine, Florida. This juvenile is only 70 days old. She is the first of her species to be bred in captivity.

Frustratingly, traditional Chinese medicine falsely believes the unique protective keratin scales (the same material as your fingernails) have curative properties. This has resulted in massive illegal taking of pangolins from the wild. With the four species of Asian pangolins becoming endangered, smugglers are now turning their attention to the four found in Africa, including this species.

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ANI062-00358

A vulnerable adult female white bellied pangolin (Phataginus tricuspis) with her baby, part of Pangolin Conservation, a non-profit organization in Saint Augustine, Florida. This juvenile is only 70 days old. She is the first of her species to be bred in captivity.

Frustratingly, traditional Chinese medicine falsely believes the unique protective keratin scales (the same material as your fingernails) have curative properties. This has resulted in massive illegal taking of pangolins from the wild. With the four species of Asian pangolins becoming endangered, smugglers are now turning their attention to the four found in Africa, including this species.

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A vulnerable adult female white bellied pangolin (Phataginus tricuspis) with her baby, part of Pangolin Conservation, a non-profit organization in Saint Augustine, Florida. This juvenile is only 70 days old. She is the first of her species to be bred in captivity.

Frustratingly, traditional Chinese medicine falsely believes the unique protective keratin scales (the same material as your fingernails) have curative properties. This has resulted in massive illegal taking of pangolins from the wild. With the four species of Asian pangolins becoming endangered, smugglers are now turning their attention to the four found in Africa, including this species.

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ANI062-00354

A vulnerable adult female white bellied pangolin (Phataginus tricuspis) with her baby, part of Pangolin Conservation, a non-profit organization in Saint Augustine, Florida. This juvenile is only 70 days old. She is the first of her species to be bred in captivity.

Frustratingly, traditional Chinese medicine falsely believes the unique protective keratin scales (the same material as your fingernails) have curative properties. This has resulted in massive illegal taking of pangolins from the wild. With the four species of Asian pangolins becoming endangered, smugglers are now turning their attention to the four found in Africa, including this species.

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A vulnerable adult female white bellied pangolin (Phataginus tricuspis) with her baby, part of Pangolin Conservation, a non-profit organization in Saint Augustine, Florida. This juvenile is only 70 days old. She is the first of her species to be bred in captivity.

Frustratingly, traditional Chinese medicine falsely believes the unique protective keratin scales (the same material as your fingernails) have curative properties. This has resulted in massive illegal taking of pangolins from the wild. With the four species of Asian pangolins becoming endangered, smugglers are now turning their attention to the four found in Africa, including this species.

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Endangered (IUCN) and federally endangered Francois’ langurs (Trachypithecus francoisi) at Omaha Henry Doorly Zoo. This species exhibits ‘aunting’ behavior, meaning several females will take care of the same baby. The bright orange coloration (which disappears by age six months) is thought to allow for easy tracking of the young one no matter which surrogate mom has it at any time.

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A woman and her son pose for a picture at Leech Lake, Minnesota.

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A woman and her daughters work with piglets, Bennet, Nebraska.

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A woman and her daughter rest while doing chores, Bennet, Nebraska.

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A mother combs her daughter’s hair before doing chores, Bennet, Nebraska.

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Mother and daughters pose for a portrait after working hogs at the Montgomery farm near Bennet, Nebraska.

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A family sands over a man in a pool, Lincoln, Nebraska.

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The Sartore family, at Roca Scary Farm (also known as Roca Berry Farm.)

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A young girl works on her homework, Lincoln, Nebraska.

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A mother and son pray before dinner, Lincoln, Nebraska.

Photo: Julie Jensen Director of Marketing | WVC O: 866.800.7326 | D: 702.443.9249 | E: j.jensen@wvc.org

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