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An unidentified moth species at Fauna Andina, a conservation center near Villarrica, Chile.

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An unidentified moth species (Lepidoptera) at Fauna Andina, a conservation center near Villarrica, Chile.

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An unidentified moth species at Fauna Andina, a conservation center near Villarrica, Chile.

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An unidentified moth species at Fauna Andina, a conservation center near Villarrica, Chile.

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A unidentified moth species (Lepidoptera) at Fauna Andina, a conservation center near Villarrica, Chile.

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A unidentified moth species (Lepidoptera) at Fauna Andina, a conservation center near Villarrica, Chile.

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A unidentified moth species (Lepidoptera) at Fauna Andina, a conservation center near Villarrica, Chile.

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An unidentified moth species (Lepidoptera) at Fauna Andina, a conservation center near Villarrica, Chile.

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An unidentified moth species (Lepidoptera) at Fauna Andina, a conservation center near Villarrica, Chile.

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An unidentified moth species (Lepidoptera) at Fauna Andina, a conservation center near Villarrica, Chile.

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An unidentified caterpillar species at Fauna Andina, a conservation center near Villarrica, Chile.

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An unidentified caterpillar species at Fauna Andina, a conservation center near Villarrica, Chile.

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An unidentified moth species at the Museo d’Orbigny Natural History Museum in Cochabamba, Bolivia.

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A Mexican jumping bean moth, Cydia deshaisiana, on the seed of the desert shrub, Sebastiania pavoniana, at the University of Florida at Gainesville.

The moth lays an egg inside the seed. The caterpillar then eats the inside of the seed, reacting to heat and light, moving or ‘jumping’ the seed to get out of the sun in the desert. The caterpillar eventually hatches out to complete the life cycle.

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A Mexican jumping bean moth, Cydia deshaisiana, on the seed of the desert shrub, Sebastiania pavoniana, at the University of Florida at Gainesville.

The moth lays an egg inside the seed. The caterpillar then eats the inside of the seed, reacting to heat and light, moving or ‘jumping’ the seed to get out of the sun in the desert. The caterpillar eventually hatches out to complete the life cycle.

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A five-spotted hawk moth (Manduca quinquemaculata) from the wild in Walton, Nebraska.

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A five-spotted hawk moth (Manduca quinquemaculata) from the wild in Walton, Nebraska.

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White-ringed atlas moth (Epiphora mythimnia) at the McGuire Center of the Florida Museum of Natural History.

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Atlas moth (Attacus atlas) at the Florida Museum of Natural History.

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African moon moth (Argema nimosae) at the Florida Museum of Natural History.

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Virginia creeper sphinx (Darapsa myron) cocoon with parasitic wasp hatchlings on it at the McGuire Center in Gainesville, Florida. The parasitic wasp pupae that are on the Darapsa myron are in the Braconidae family and in the genus Contesia.

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Virginia creeper sphinx (Darapsa myron) cocoon with parasitic wasp hatchlings on it at the McGuire Center in Gainesville, Florida. The parasitic wasp pupae that were on the Darapsa myron are in the Braconidae family and in the genus Contesia.

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White-ringed atlas moth (Epiphora mythimnia) at the McGuire Center of the Florida Museum of Natural History.

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Forbes silk moth (Rothschildia lebeau) at the Saint Louis Zoo.

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Forbes silk moth (Rothschildia lebeau) at the Saint Louis Zoo.

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A white-lined sphinx (Hyles lineata) from the wild in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma.

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A white-lined sphinx (Hyles lineata) from the wild in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma.

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A white-lined sphinx (Hyles lineata) from the wild in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma.

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A luna moth (Actias luna) at the Lincoln Children’s Zoo.

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A luna moth (Actias luna) at the Lincoln Children’s Zoo.

Photo: Julie Jensen Director of Marketing | WVC O: 866.800.7326 | D: 702.443.9249 | E: j.jensen@wvc.org

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