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A critically endangered (IUCN) and federally endangered Santa Catalina Island fox (Urocyon littoralis catalinae) named Tachi. Tachi is a hand raised, educational animal, and is the last captive from a breeding program designed to save the species.

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A critically endangered (IUCN) and federally endangered Santa Catalina Island fox (Urocyon littoralis catalinae) named Tachi. Tachi is a hand raised, educational animal, and is the last captive from a breeding program designed to save the species.

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A critically endangered (IUCN) and federally endangered Santa Catalina Island fox (Urocyon littoralis catalinae). The foxes were trapped for an island-wide population estimate, as well as for vaccinations and various studies.

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A critically endangered (IUCN) and federally endangered Santa Catalina Island fox (Urocyon littoralis catalinae). The foxes were trapped for an island-wide population estimate, as well as for vaccinations and various studies.

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ESA002-00008

A critically endangered (IUCN) and federally endangered Santa Catalina Island fox (Urocyon littoralis catalinae). The foxes were trapped for an island-wide population estimate, as well as for vaccinations and various studies.

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ESA002-00005

A critically endangered (IUCN) and federally endangered Santa Catalina Island fox (Urocyon littoralis catalinae). The foxes were trapped for an island-wide population estimate, as well as for vaccinations and various studies.

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ESA002-00002

A critically endangered (IUCN) and federally endangered Santa Catalina Island fox (Urocyon littoralis catalinae). The foxes were trapped for an island-wide population estimate, as well as for vaccinations and various studies.

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ESA002-00003

A critically endangered (IUCN) and federally endangered Santa Catalina Island fox (Urocyon littoralis catalinae). The foxes were trapped for an island-wide population estimate, as well as for vaccinations and various studies.

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ESA002-00001

A critically endangered (IUCN) and federally endangered Santa Catalina Island fox (Urocyon littoralis catalinae). The foxes were trapped for an island-wide population estimate, as well as for vaccinations and various studies.

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Aymara woman with her llama herd on the desolate landscape of the high Chilean Atacama desert.

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A western diamondback rattlesnake (Crotalus atrox) in the foothills of the Wichita Mountains in Oklahoma. Studies are showing that rattlesnakes that have the genetic tendency to migrate are being killed in ever-increasing numbers on our nation’s roads, leaving those snakes with non-migrating tendencies behind to breed.

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A western diamondback rattlesnake (Crotalus atrox) in the foothills of the Wichita Mountains in Oklahoma. Studies are showing that rattlesnakes that have the genetic tendency to migrate are being killed in ever-increasing numbers on our nation’s roads, leaving those snakes with non-migrating tendencies behind to breed.

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ANI082-00025

A western diamondback rattlesnake (Crotalus atrox) in the foothills of the Wichita Mountains in Oklahoma. Studies are showing that rattlesnakes that have the genetic tendency to migrate are being killed in ever-increasing numbers on our nation’s roads, leaving those snakes with non-migrating tendencies behind to breed.

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A western diamondback rattlesnake (Crotalus atrox) in the foothills of the Wichita Mountains in Oklahoma. Studies are showing that rattlesnakes that have the genetic tendency to migrate are being killed in ever-increasing numbers on our nation’s roads, leaving those snakes with non-migrating tendencies behind to breed.

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A western diamondback rattlesnake (Crotalus atrox) in the foothills of the Wichita Mountains in Oklahoma. Studies are showing that rattlesnakes that have the genetic tendency to migrate are being killed in ever-increasing numbers on our nation’s roads, leaving those snakes with non-migrating tendencies behind to breed.

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ANI082-00028

A western diamondback rattlesnake (Crotalus atrox) in the foothills of the Wichita Mountains in Oklahoma. Studies are showing that rattlesnakes that have the genetic tendency to migrate are being killed in ever-increasing numbers on our nation’s roads, leaving those snakes with non-migrating tendencies behind to breed.

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ANI082-00029

A western diamondback rattlesnake (Crotalus atrox) in the foothills of the Wichita Mountains in Oklahoma. Studies are showing that rattlesnakes that have the genetic tendency to migrate are being killed in ever-increasing numbers on our nation’s roads, leaving those snakes with non-migrating tendencies behind to breed.

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ANI082-00030

A western diamondback rattlesnake (Crotalus atrox) in the foothills of the Wichita Mountains in Oklahoma. Studies are showing that rattlesnakes that have the genetic tendency to migrate are being killed in ever-increasing numbers on our nation’s roads, leaving those snakes with non-migrating tendencies behind to breed.

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ANI082-00031

A western diamondback rattlesnake (Crotalus atrox) in the foothills of the Wichita Mountains in Oklahoma. Studies are showing that rattlesnakes that have the genetic tendency to migrate are being killed in ever-increasing numbers on our nation’s roads, leaving those snakes with non-migrating tendencies behind to breed.

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A captive Catalina Island fox (Urocyon littoralis catalinae) named Tachi at Quail Valley Fox Clinic in Middle Ranch on Catalina Island, California. (US: Endangered, IUCN: Critically Endangered)

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A large sage grouse lek of 69 birds in Pinedale, Wyoming. Although this Big Sandy Recreation Area is still intact and pristine, no one can say for how long, as it has been targeted for drilling.

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Montana’s Rocky Mountain Front is still an intact ecosystem and home to bighorn sheep, grizzlies, and other animals. If the area is developed for coal bed methane drilling, that will all change.

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A natural gas plant next to a cemetery in Bloomfield, NM.

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A methane fire burns under a rancher’s land near Decker, MT. The underground water that once kept the flame in check has been drained off during coal bed methane development, so the fire now shows at the surface.

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The crew of a coal bed methane drilling rig in Wyoming. While harmful to the environment, gas drilling provides jobs to the locals — at least, while the gas lasts.

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A flare erupts at a natural gas well near Pinedale, Wyoming.

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The BLM office in Buffalo, WY approved 3000 natural gas drilling permits in 2004, generating a small mountain of paperwork.

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Misters send the water drained off during coal bed methane drilling airborne on a development near Gillette, WY.

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Lightning illuminates the sky over Adobe Town in Wyoming’s Red Desert area. Once proposed for a wilderness designation, the area is now slated for coal bed methane development.

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Hunters with their day’s take, a mule deer, near Choteau, MT. Outdoorsmen have joined forces with environmentalists on the Rocky Mountain front to protect the region from coal bed methane drilling.

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“Flying fish” (minnows) over the Powder River in Wyoming, an ecosystem threatened by coal bed methane development.

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A homeowner in the powder river basin holds up a glass of water from a now unusable well. The well’s contents turned into a methane slurry after coal bed methane development began nearby.

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Aerial of the Jonah Field natural gas drilling area near Pinedale, Wyoming.

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Coal bed methane drilling near this house near Rifle, CO scared off the local elk herd and destroyed the property value.

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Bighorn sheep in the Rocky Mountain Front near Augusta, MT. The area is one of the last places to see the species in North America, and is currently threatened with coal bed methane development.

Photo: Julie Jensen Director of Marketing | WVC O: 866.800.7326 | D: 702.443.9249 | E: j.jensen@wvc.org

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