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A web nest made by a Pink Toe Tarantula (Caribena versicolor) at the Moscow Zoo.

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A web nest made by a Pink Toe Tarantula (Caribena versicolor) at the Moscow Zoo.

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Two-day-old mourning dove hatchlings (Zenaida macroura) at Wildlife Care Association

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Two-day-old mourning dove hatchlings (Zenaida macroura) at Wildlife Care Association

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Two-day-old mourning dove hatchlings (Zenaida macroura) at Wildlife Care Association

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A federally endangered interior least tern (Sterna antillarum athalassos) on a nest sand pit along the Platte River near North Bend, NE.

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A woman searching for rowi kiwi nests in a forest on Lake Mapourika near Franz Josef Glacier, New Zealand. The rowi kiwi is the rarest of all the kiwi species with fewer than 400 animals remaining. Once found, eggs are brought in from nests in the wild, increasing the chance of chick survival from 5 percent in the wild to 75 percent if the chick is raised in captivity and then released.

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A woman searching for rowi kiwi nests in a forest on Lake Mapourika near Franz Josef Glacier, New Zealand. The rowi kiwi is the rarest of all the kiwi species with fewer than 400 animals remaining. Once found, eggs are brought in from nests in the wild, increasing the chance of chick survival from 5 percent in the wild to 75 percent if the chick is raised in captivity and then released.

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A woman searching for rowi kiwi nests in a forest on Lake Mapourika near Franz Josef Glacier, New Zealand. The rowi kiwi is the rarest of all the kiwi species with fewer than 400 animals remaining. Once found, eggs are brought in from nests in the wild, increasing the chance of chick survival from 5 percent in the wild to 75 percent if the chick is raised in captivity and then released.

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A woman searching for rowi kiwi nests in a forest on Lake Mapourika near Franz Josef Glacier, New Zealand. The rowi kiwi is the rarest of all the kiwi species with fewer than 400 animals remaining. Once found, eggs are brought in from nests in the wild, increasing the chance of chick survival from 5 percent in the wild to 75 percent if the chick is raised in captivity and then released.

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A woman searching for rowi kiwi nests in a forest on Lake Mapourika near Franz Josef Glacier, New Zealand. The rowi kiwi is the rarest of all the kiwi species with fewer than 400 animals remaining. Once found, eggs are brought in from nests in the wild, increasing the chance of chick survival from 5 percent in the wild to 75 percent if the chick is raised in captivity and then released.

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A woman searching for rowi kiwi nests in a forest on Lake Mapourika near Franz Josef Glacier, New Zealand. The rowi kiwi is the rarest of all the kiwi species with fewer than 400 animals remaining. Once found, eggs are brought in from nests in the wild, increasing the chance of chick survival from 5 percent in the wild to 75 percent if the chick is raised in captivity and then released.

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Two women helping set up to photograph a rowi kiwi or Okarito kiwi (Apteryx rowi) at the West Coast Wildlife Centre in Franz Josef Glacier, New Zealand. This is the rarest of all the kiwi species with fewer than 400 animals remaining. This center is the place where they incubate eggs that are brought in from nests in the wild, increasing the chance of chick survival from 5 percent in the wild to 75 percent if the chick is raised in captivity and then released.

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A man and woman out searching for rowi kiwi nests in a forest on Lake Mapourika near Franz Josef Glacier, New Zealand. The rowi kiwi is the rarest of all the kiwi species with fewer than 400 animals remaining. Once found, eggs are brought in from nests in the wild, increasing the chance of chick survival from 5 percent in the wild to 75 percent if the chick is raised in captivity and then released.

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A zebra paper wasp (Polistes exclamans) at the Dallas Zoo.

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Zebra paper wasps (Polistes exclamans) at the Dallas Zoo.

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Bald eagle chicks at the Sutton Avian Research Center near Bartlesville, OK. They were hatched in captivity as part of the Bald Eagle Recovery Act.

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A naturalist for Sea Island inspects loggerhead sea turtle nests on the beach, Sea Island, Georgia.

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Nest cavities of cliff swallows near Ceresco, Nebraska.

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Endangered (US and IUCN) golden-cheeked warblers (Dendroica chrysoparia) Killeen, Texas.

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A red-footed booby (Sula sula) with vegetation for nesting on Tower Island in Galapagos National Park.

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Red-footed boobies (Sula sula) as they pick through vegetation for nesting on Tower Island in Galapagos National Park.

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A mated pair of red-footed boobies (Sula sula) on Tower Island, as they tend to their nest. This island is a major nesting ground for them.

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A red-footed booby (Sula sula) as it gathers vegetation for nest building, on Tower Island in Galapagos National Park. This island is a major nesting ground for this species.

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The nest of the paper wasp (Polistes Latreille), an introduced/non-native species on Santa Cruz Island, Galapagos National Park.

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A Humboldt penguin on a nest on the Pacific coast of Chile, near Antofagasta.

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Daniel de Granville, Joel’s assistant, hangs from a climbing harness while adjusting a remote camera to photograph a jabiru stork’s nest (right) in Brazil’s Pantanal.

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Assistant Daniel De Granville climbs to a tree platform next to a jabiru stork nest in Brazil’s Pantanal.

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A prodigy of adaptation, the endangered least tern (Sterna albifrons) survived the test of evolution by nesting on barren sandbars, protected from predators by the swift flow of surrounding rivers. These moated habitats are created by naturally occurring spring floods, which humans now spend millions to prevent.

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Red-headed woodpeckers (Melanerpes erythrocephalus) feed their young high in the forest canopy at Spring Creek Prairie near Denton, Nebraska.

Photo: Julie Jensen Director of Marketing | WVC O: 866.800.7326 | D: 702.443.9249 | E: j.jensen@wvc.org

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