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ANI111-00058

An East African egg-eating snake (Dasypeltis medici) at Prague Zoo. This species lives along the coastal forests of eastern Africa and eats nothing but bird eggs. This means it is able to feed heavily during the bird nesting season of two to three months, then often will go without eating for the rest of the year until the birds nest again.

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ANI111-00057

An East African egg-eating snake (Dasypeltis medici) at Prague Zoo. This species lives along the coastal forests of eastern Africa and eats nothing but bird eggs. This means it is able to feed heavily during the bird nesting season of two to three months, then often will go without eating for the rest of the year until the birds nest again.

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ANI109-00395

A secret toad-headed agama (Phrynocephalus mystaceus mystaceus) at Prague Zoo. It has cheek flaps that it can extend out the sides of its head to make its mouth look wider, scaring off some predators.

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ANI109-00394

A secret toad-headed agama (Phrynocephalus mystaceus mystaceus) at Prague Zoo. It has cheek flaps that it can extend out the sides of its head to make its mouth look wider, scaring off some predators.

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ANI109-00393

A secret toad-headed agama (Phrynocephalus mystaceus mystaceus) at Prague Zoo. It has cheek flaps that it can extend out the sides of its head to make its mouth look wider, scaring off some predators.

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ANI109-00392

A secret toad-headed agama (Phrynocephalus mystaceus mystaceus) at Prague Zoo. It has cheek flaps that it can extend out the sides of its head to make its mouth look wider, scaring off some predators.

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ANI081-00226

An East African clawed gecko (Holodactylus africanus) at Prague Zoo. This species eats mainly termites, the energy from which ends up being stored as fat in its tail. The Prague Zoo claims to have had the first documented captive breeding of this species.

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ANI081-00225

An East African clawed gecko (Holodactylus africanus) at Prague Zoo. This species eats mainly termites, the energy from which ends up being stored as fat in its tail. The Prague Zoo claims to have had the first documented captive breeding of this species.

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A decorator crab (Camposcia retusa) at the St. Louis Zoo.

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A spider decorator crab (Camposcia retusa) at the St. Louis Zoo.

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ANI067-00463

An Ozark hellbender (Cryptobranchus alleganiensis bishopi) at the St. Louis Zoo. This facility is famous for rearing hellbenders, but also for studying cures for chytrid (bd) fungus and other threats.

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ANI067-00462

An Ozark hellbender (Cryptobranchus alleganiensis bishopi) at the St. Louis Zoo. This facility is famous for rearing hellbenders, but also for studying cures for chytrid (bd) fungus and other threats.

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ANI067-00461

An Ozark hellbender (Cryptobranchus alleganiensis bishopi) at the St. Louis Zoo. This facility is famous for rearing hellbenders, but also for studying cures for chytrid (bd) fungus and other threats.

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ANI067-00460

An Eastern hellbender (Cryptobranchus alleganiensis alleganiensis) at the St. Louis Zoo. This facility is famous for rearing hellbenders, but also for studying cures for chytrid (bd) fungus and other threats.

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ANI067-00459

An Eastern hellbender (Cryptobranchus alleganiensis alleganiensis) at the St. Louis Zoo. This facility is famous for rearing hellbenders, but also for studying cures for chytrid (bd) fungus and other threats.

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ANI067-00458

An Eastern hellbender (Cryptobranchus alleganiensis alleganiensis) at St. Louis Zoo. This facility is famous for rearing hellbenders, but also for studying cures for chytrid (bd) fungus and other threats.

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An olinguito (Bassaricyon neblina) at Zoologico de Quito.

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ANI108-00054

An endangered Peruvian woolly monkey (Lagothrix cana) at Cetas-IBAMA, a wildlife rehab center in Manaus, Brazil. This is administered by IBAMA, the government wildlife agency of Brazil.

This is a juvenile female. She had severe growth deformities due to poor nutrition as she was being reared as a pet by a citizen here. Her mother was likely killed so that she could be sold into the pet trade.

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ANI108-00053

An endangered Peruvian woolly monkey (Lagothrix cana) at Cetas-IBAMA, a wildlife rehab center in Manaus, Brazil. This is administered by IBAMA, the government wildlife agency of Brazil.

This is a juvenile female. She had severe growth deformities due to poor nutrition as she was being reared as a pet by a citizen here. Her mother was likely killed so that she could be sold into the pet trade.

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ANI108-00052

An endangered Peruvian woolly monkey (Lagothrix cana) at Cetas-IBAMA, a wildlife rehab center in Manaus, Brazil. This is administered by IBAMA, the government wildlife agency of Brazil.

This is a juvenile female. She had severe growth deformities due to poor nutrition as she was being reared as a pet by a citizen here. Her mother was likely killed so that she could be sold into the pet trade.

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ANI108-00051

An endangered Peruvian woolly monkey (Lagothrix cana) at Cetas-IBAMA, a wildlife rehab center in Manaus, Brazil. This is administered by IBAMA, the government wildlife agency of Brazil.

This is a juvenile female. She had severe growth deformities due to poor nutrition as she was being reared as a pet by a citizen here. Her mother was likely killed so that she could be sold into the pet trade.

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ANI069-00033

Two juvenile common opossum (Didelphis marsupialis) at Cetas-IBAMA, a wildlife rehab center in Manaus, Brazil. This is administered by IBAMA, the government wildlife agency of Brazil.

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ANI061-00023

A male golden takin (Budorcas taxicolor bedfordi) at Tierpark Berlin. This species is listed as vulnerable by IUCN.

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ANI061-00022

A male golden takin (Budorcas taxicolor bedfordi) at Tierpark Berlin. This species is listed as vulnerable by IUCN.

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A male golden takin (Budorcas taxicolor bedfordi) at Tierpark Berlin. This species is listed as vulnerable by IUCN.

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ANI110-00075

An endangered female gray-bellied marsupial frog (Gastrotheca litonedis) at Centro Jambatu in Quito, Ecuador. This animal is originally from Busa Lagoon, Azuay Province, Ecuador. This species is threatened by habitat loss.

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ANI110-00053

A helmet incubator frog (Hemiphractus scutatus) at Centro Jambatu in Quito, Ecuador. This animal is originally from Shiripuno, Sucumbios Province, Ecuador. This species is known as a frog eater, hence the huge mouth. This species carries clutches of eggs adhered onto the back of the female. The development is direct from eggs into fully developed froglets.

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ANI110-00052

A helmet incubator frog (Hemiphractus scutatus) at Centro Jambatu in Quito, Ecuador. This animal is originally from Shiripuno, Sucumbios Province, Ecuador. This species is known as a frog eater, hence the huge mouth. This species carries clutches of eggs adhered onto the back of the female. The development is direct from eggs into fully developed froglets.

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ANI110-00051

A helmet incubator frog (Hemiphractus scutatus) at Centro Jambatu in Quito, Ecuador. This animal is originally from Shiripuno, Sucumbios Province, Ecuador. This species is known as a frog eater, hence the huge mouth. This species carries clutches of eggs adhered onto the back of the female. The development is direct from eggs into fully developed froglets.

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ANI110-00050

A helmet incubator frog (Hemiphractus scutatus) at Centro Jambatu in Quito, Ecuador. This animal is originally from Shiripuno, Sucumbios Province, Ecuador. This species is known as a frog eater, hence the huge mouth. This species carries clutches of eggs adhered onto the back of the female. The development is direct from eggs into fully developed froglets.

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ANI110-00049

A helmet incubator frog (Hemiphractus scutatus) at Centro Jambatu in Quito, Ecuador. This animal is originally from Shiripuno, Sucumbios Province, Ecuador. This species is known as a frog eater, hence the huge mouth. This species carries clutches of eggs adhered onto the back of the female. The development is direct from eggs into fully developed froglets.

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ANI110-00048

A ranger marsupial frog (Gastrotheca orophylax) at Centro Jambatu in Quito, Ecuador. This animal is originally from Santa Barbara, Sucumbios Province, Ecuador. This species is listed as vulnerable by IUCN. The population is affected due to habitat destruction, such as agriculture, pesticide use, pine and eucalyptus forest plantations. Like all members of the Gastrotheca genus, females of this species have a pouch on their backs from which fully developed froglets emerge.

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ANI110-00047

A ranger marsupial frog (Gastrotheca orophylax) at Centro Jambatu in Quito, Ecuador. This animal is originally from Santa Barbara, Sucumbios Province, Ecuador. This species is listed as vulnerable by IUCN. The population is affected due to habitat destruction, such as agriculture, pesticide use, pine and eucalyptus forest plantations. Like all members of the Gastrotheca genus, females of this species have a pouch on their backs from which fully developed froglets emerge.

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ANI110-00046

A ranger marsupial frog (Gastrotheca orophylax) at Centro Jambatu in Quito, Ecuador. This animal is originally from Santa Barbara, Sucumbios Province, Ecuador. This species is listed as vulnerable by IUCN. The population is affected due to habitat destruction, such as agriculture, pesticide use, pine and eucalyptus forest plantations. Like all members of the Gastrotheca genus, females of this species have a pouch on their backs from which fully developed froglets emerge.

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ANI110-00045

A ranger marsupial frog (Gastrotheca orophylax) at Centro Jambatu in Quito, Ecuador. This animal is originally from Santa Barbara, Sucumbios Province, Ecuador. This species is listed as vulnerable by IUCN. The population is affected due to habitat destruction, such as agriculture, pesticide use, pine and eucalyptus forest plantations. Like all members of the Gastrotheca genus, females of this species have a pouch on their backs from which fully developed froglets emerge.

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ANI110-00044

A Peru mushroom tongue salamander (Bolitoglossa peruviana) at Centro Jambatu in Quito, Ecuador. This animal is originally from Yasuni, Orellana Province, Ecuador. Built to look like a twig, this animal is arboreal.

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