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A portrait of a man on the dock at Grand Isle, Louisiana.

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A dead black drum as it floats through oiled waters near Grand Isle, LA.

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Underwater shots looking at the surface of Barataria Bay that’s now covered in various forms of oil from the spill.

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A sea turtle that was rescued from the deep water horizon oil spill being rehabilitated at the Audubon Nature Institute in New Orleans, Louisiana.

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A sea turtle that was rescued from the deep water horizon oil spill being rehabilitated at the Audubon Nature Institute in New Orleans, Louisiana.

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A woman stands beneath a home watching crews build new berms, with BP money, in order to protect the beaches from storm water and the oil from the deep water horizon spill that could come with it on Dauphin Island, Alabama.

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Workers sift through sand to separate the oil on the beaches of Dauphin Island, Alabama.

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Workers from Southern Native Plants out of Milton, Florida planting sea oats (Uniola paniculata) on a newly created sand dune to protect Dauphin Island, Alabama from the deep water horizon oil spill.

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Workers from Southern Native Plants out of Milton, Florida planting sea oats (Uniola paniculata) on a newly created sand dune to protect Dauphin Island, Alabama from the deep water horizon oil spill.

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On board a PHI helicopter/media flight covering the deep water horizon oil spill at the spill site, two types of burning are now going on. The big black column of smoke is from oil being burned after being skimmed up with ships towing booms. The second kind of burning is coming in the forms of big flares at the actual relief well drilling site itself. A new rig has been brought in to directly burn off whatever it can pull off the tophat, which some have estimated at a million gallons a day.

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On board a PHI helicopter/media flight covering the deep water horizon oil spill at the spill site, two types of burning are now going on. The big black column of smoke is from oil being burned after being skimmed up with ships towing booms. The second kind of burning is coming in the forms of big flares at the actual relief well drilling site itself. A new rig has been brought in to directly burn off whatever it can pull off the tophat, which some have estimated at a million gallons a day.

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On board a PHI helicopter/media flight covering the deep water horizon oil spill at the spill site, two types of burning are now going on. The big black column of smoke is from oil being burned after being skimmed up with ships towing booms. The second kind of burning is coming in the forms of big flares at the actual relief well drilling site itself. A new rig has been brought in to directly burn off whatever it can pull off the tophat, which some have estimated at a million gallons a day.

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A group of concerned local residents meet at a community outreach event on Dauphin Island, Alabama.

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Workers from Southern Native Plants out of Milton, Florida are planting sea oats (Uniola paniculata) in sand dunes on Dauphin Island, Alabama.

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Sea turtles that were rescued from the deep water horizon oil spill being rehabilitated at the Audubon Nature Institute in New Orleans, Louisiana.

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A crew working to clean a brown pelican (Pelecanus occidentalis) at the rehab center in Fort Jackson, Louisiana. This is where the majority of the oiled birds were brought in from the deep water horizon oil spill.

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A crew working to clean a brown pelican (Pelecanus occidentalis) at the rehab center in Fort Jackson, Louisiana. This is where the majority of the oiled birds were brought in from the deep water horizon oil spill.

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A brown pelican (Pelecanus occidentalis) waits in a holding pen at the rehab center in Fort Jackson, Louisiana. This is where most of the oiled birds were brought in from the deep water horizon oil spill.

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A crew working to clean a brown pelican (Pelecanus occidentalis) at the rehab center in Fort Jackson, Louisiana. This is where the majority of the oiled birds were brought in from the deep water horizon oil spill.

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A crew working to clean a pelican at the rehab center in Fort Jackson, Louisiana. This is where the majority of the oiled birds were brought in from the deep water horizon oil spill.

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A crew working to clean an oiled bird at the rehab center in Fort Jackson, Louisiana. This is where the majority of the oiled birds were brought in from the deep water horizon oil spill.

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A crew working to clean an oiled bird at the rehab center in Fort Jackson, Louisiana. This is where the majority of the oiled birds were brought in from the deep water horizon oil spill.

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Sand berms frame rows of beach houses on Dauphin Island, Alabama during the deep water horizon oil spill.

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Sand berms frame rows of beach houses on Dauphin Island, Alabama during the deep water horizon oil spill.

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Workers washing an oiled brown pelican (Pelecanus occidentalis) at the rehab center in Fort Jackson, Louisiana. This is where the majority of the oiled birds were brought in from the deep water horizon oil spill.

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A sea turtle that was rescued from the deep water horizon oil spill are being rehabilitated at the Audubon Nature Institute in New Orleans, Louisiana.

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A sea turtle that was rescued from the deep water horizon oil spill are being rehabilitated at the Audubon Nature Institute in New Orleans, Louisiana.

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An aerial of heavily oiled marshlands surrounded by oil booms in Barataria Bay, Louisiana.

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A group of oiled pelicans recused from the gulf oil spill waiting to be washed at the rehab center in Fort Jackson, Louisiana. This is were the majority of the oiled birds were brought in from the deep water horizon oil spill.

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A crew working to clean a brown pelican (Pelecanus occidentalis) at the rehab center in Fort Jackson, Louisiana. This is where the majority of the oiled birds were brought in from the deep water horizon oil spill.

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A group of oiled pelicans recused from the gulf oil spill waiting to be washed at the rehab center in Fort Jackson, Louisiana. This is were the majority of the oiled birds were brought in from the deep water horizon oil spill.

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An aerial of an watercraft cutting through the surface oil near the deep water horizon spill site in the Gulf of Mexico.

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An aerial of watercraft cutting through the surface oil near the deep water horizon spill site in the Gulf of Mexico.

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Helicopter shadow over oiled marsh near Port Sulphur, Louisiana.

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A clean up crew hired by BP tries to sop oil from the Deepwater Horizon spill, along the shoreline on Queen Bess island in Barataria Bay, Louisiana.

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A dead black drum (Pogonias cromis) as it floats through oil from the Deepwater Horizon spill, near Grand Isle, Louisiana.

Photo: Julie Jensen Director of Marketing | WVC O: 866.800.7326 | D: 702.443.9249 | E: j.jensen@wvc.org

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