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ANI082-00091

A fisherman in Bighorn Creek, part of the Kootenay River system.

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ONA014-00029

Joel Sartore photographs a Chinese water dragon, Physignathus cocincinus, at the Lincoln Children’s Zoo in Lincoln, NE.

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SCE049-00026

Horses are ridden through King’s Canyon National Park.

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A horse and rider lead a string of pack animals in King’s Canyon National Park, California, USA.

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ONA014-00019

Behinds the scenes Photo Ark shoot of a pygmy killer whale (Feresa attenuata) at the Institute of Marine Mammal Studies (IMMS) in Gulfport, MS.

This animal was found washed up on Cat Island, MS, and they rescued it. Its age is 3-4 years old. It’s very rare to find one washed up alive.

It had broken ribs from being washed up.
Reason for stranding was either that it lost its mother or was separated from its group.

This animal had to be held in the water by staff 24/7 for the first two or three days after they brought it to IMMS.
It had infections, was dehydrated, malnourished and had lost its equilibrium.

It is now gaining strength and they hope to release it back into Gulf of Mexico before the turn of the year.

Very little is known about this deepwater species. IMMS saved another one like it a few years ago, and thanks to a satellite tag on the animal once it was released, they learned a lot about where they go, how deep they dive, etc.

The IMMS is a one of kind place designed rescue and rehab marine mammals and turtles.

The goal is to rescue, rehab and release back to the wild.

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ONA014-00018

Behinds the scenes Photo Ark shoot of a pygmy killer whale (Feresa attenuata) at the Institute of Marine Mammal Studies (IMMS) in Gulfport, MS.

This animal was found washed up on Cat Island, MS, and they rescued it. Its age is 3-4 years old. It’s very rare to find one washed up alive.

It had broken ribs from being washed up.
Reason for stranding was either that it lost its mother or was separated from its group.

This animal had to be held in the water by staff 24/7 for the first two or three days after they brought it to IMMS.
It had infections, was dehydrated, malnourished and had lost its equilibrium.

It is now gaining strength and they hope to release it back into Gulf of Mexico before the turn of the year.

Very little is known about this deepwater species. IMMS saved another one like it a few years ago, and thanks to a satellite tag on the animal once it was released, they learned a lot about where they go, how deep they dive, etc.

The IMMS is a one of kind place designed rescue and rehab marine mammals and turtles.

The goal is to rescue, rehab and release back to the wild.

Photo

ONA014-00017

Behinds the scenes Photo Ark shoot of a pygmy killer whale (Feresa attenuata) at the Institute of Marine Mammal Studies (IMMS) in Gulfport, MS.

This animal was found washed up on Cat Island, MS, and they rescued it. Its age is 3-4 years old. It’s very rare to find one washed up alive.

It had broken ribs from being washed up.
Reason for stranding was either that it lost its mother or was separated from its group.

This animal had to be held in the water by staff 24/7 for the first two or three days after they brought it to IMMS.
It had infections, was dehydrated, malnourished and had lost its equilibrium.

It is now gaining strength and they hope to release it back into Gulf of Mexico before the turn of the year.

Very little is known about this deepwater species. IMMS saved another one like it a few years ago, and thanks to a satellite tag on the animal once it was released, they learned a lot about where they go, how deep they dive, etc.

The IMMS is a one of kind place designed rescue and rehab marine mammals and turtles.

The goal is to rescue, rehab and release back to the wild.

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BIR014-00051

Red-winged blackbird (Agelaius phoeniceus) at Tracy Aviary.

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ONA007-00101

A zookeeper with lilac-breasted rollers (Coracias caudatus caudatus) at Omaha’s Henry Doorly Zoo and Aquarium.

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ANI101-00453

A vulnerable (IUCN) Madagascar painted frog (Mantella madagascariensis) from a private collection.

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BIR067-00361

African yellow white-eye (Zosterops senegalensis) from the private collection of Cornel Roels of Choussy, France.

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ONA014-00012

A portrait of Joel Sartore taken by Kanzi the Bonobo (Pan paniscus) at the Ape Cognition and Conservation Initiative (ACCI) in Des Moines, Iowa.
Kanzi took the portrait with a remote trigger during a Photo Ark documentary series by Nat Geo Wild.

The Ape Cognition and Conservation Initiative is the only research facility in North America to exclusively house and study bonobos. The Ape Initiative’s programs aim to enrich the lives of bonobos and increase awareness of bonobos and other great apes worldwide through responsible and sustainable research and conservation education. The Ape Initiative is situated on 230 acres in Des Moines, Iowa, USA – with over 6 acres of ape-accessible space. The Ape Initiative bonobos include the world-famous Kanzi, whose comprehension of spoken English and use of a lexigram keyboard has been well documented. All bonobos living at the Ape Initiative participate in a variety of husbandry activities as well as behavioral and cognitive research aimed at uncovering the evolutionary origins of human language, cognition, and behavior.

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ONA007-00210

Cole Sartore with a bison herd at Maxwell State Game Preserve near Canton, KS.

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ONA007-00209

A two-month old jaguar cub (Panthera onca) named Teiku being bottle fed at the Santo Domingo Zoo.

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A two-month old jaguar cub (Panthera onca) named Teiku being bottle fed at the Santo Domingo Zoo.

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A two-month old jaguar cub (Panthera onca) named Teiku being bottle fed at the Santo Domingo Zoo.

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A two-month old jaguar cub (Panthera onca) named Teiku being bottle fed at the Santo Domingo Zoo.

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ONA007-00205

Veterinarian bottle feeding two female hand-raised nine-day-old clouded leopard cubs, (Neofelis nebulosa nebulosa), at the Nashville Zoo.

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Veterinarian bottle feeding two female hand-raised nine-day-old clouded leopard cubs, Neofelis nebulosa, at the Nashville Zoo.

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Veterinarian bottle feeding two female hand-raised nine-day-old clouded leopard cubs, (Neofelis nebulosa nebulosa), at the Nashville Zoo.

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A cyclist on Signal Hill overlooking Cape Town, South Africa.

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ONA007-00198

A two-month old jaguar cub (Panthera onca) named Teiku being bottle fed at the Santo Domingo Zoo.

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BIR067-00173

An America robin (Turdus migratorius nigrideus) at the Carolina Waterfowl Rescue.

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BIR049-00100

Trapping and banding the federally endangered Florida grasshopper sparrow at Kissimmee Prairie Preserve State Park.

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BIR052-00198

Two-day-old mourning dove hatchlings (Zenaida macroura) at Wildlife Care Association

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BIR057-00116

Oriole warbler (Hypergerus atriceps) at the Oklahoma City Zoo.

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ONA007-00196

Joel Sartore photographs a Yaqui catfish (Ictalurus pricei) at the Arizona Sonora Desert Museum in Tucson, AZ.

Photo: Julie Jensen Director of Marketing | WVC O: 866.800.7326 | D: 702.443.9249 | E: j.jensen@wvc.org

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