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FIS027-00101

Pacific herring, Clupea pallasii, at the Alaska SeaLife Center.

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FIS027-00103

Pacific herring, Clupea pallasii, at the Alaska SeaLife Center.

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FIS021-00041

Arctic cookie star, Ceramaster arcticus, at the Alaska SeaLife Center.

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ESA002-00364

An endangered (IUCN) and federally endangered Higgins eye pearly mussel (Lampsilis higginsii) at the Genoa National Fish Hatchery, Genoa, Wisconsin.

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ESA002-00356

Critically endangered (IUCN) and federally endangered Cumberlandian combshell (Epioblasma brevidens). It has lures that look like fish eggs on top that are used to attract fish. When a fish strikes at the lures, the mussels then eject their larvae into the fish’s gills and are able to increase their distribution, even upstream. The Clinch River has more federally listed aquatic species than any river in North America, yet is threatened by pollution and habitat loss. Coal mining in the watershed now raises the threat even more.

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ESA002-00346

Critically endangered (IUCN) and federally endangered Cumberlandian combshell (Epioblasma brevidens). It has lures that look like fish eggs on top that are used to attract fish. When a fish strikes at the lures, the mussels then eject their larvae into the fish’s gills and are able to increase their distribution, even upstream. The Clinch River has more federally listed aquatic species than any river in North America, yet it is threatened by pollution and habitat loss. Coal mining in the watershed now raises the threat even more.

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ESA001-00597

An endangered Quitobaquito pupfish (Cyprinodon macularis eremus).

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ESA001-00598

An endangered Quitobaquito pupfish (Cyprinodon macularis eremus).

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ESA001-00594

An endangered Quitobaquito pupfish (Cyprinodon macularis eremus).

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ESA001-00595

An endangered Quitobaquito pupfish (Cyprinodon macularis eremus).

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ESA001-00596

An endangered Quitobaquito pupfish (Cyprinodon macularis eremus).

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ESA001-00482

The Palos Verdes blue butterfly, now thought extinct (Glaucopsyche lygdamus palosverdesensis). This photo was taken at the Maguire Center for Lepidoptera and Biodiversity, Gainesville, FL. This is located on the campus of the University of Florida and is part of the Florida Museum of Natural History.

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ESA001-00346

An endangered Higgins eye pearly mussel (Lampsilis higginsii) at the Genoa National Fish Hatchery, Genoa, Wisconsin.

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ESA001-00347

An endangered Higgins eye pearly mussel (Lampsilis higginsii) at the Genoa National Fish Hatchery, Genoa, Wisconsin.

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ESA001-00348

An endangered (IUCN) and federally endangered Higgins eye pearly mussel (Lampsilis higginsii) at the Genoa National Fish Hatchery, Genoa, Wisconsin.

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ESA001-00328

A hawthorn (Crataegus collina) in Werner Park, Nashville, TN.

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ESA001-00331

Pyne’s ground plum or Guthrie’s ground-plum (Astragalus bibullatus), a federally endangered plant that exists only in a one-mile-square area outside of Nashville within the ‘cedar glades’ ecosystem.

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ESA001-00339

An endangered Higgins eye pearly mussel (Lampsilis higginsii) at the Genoa National Fish Hatchery, Genoa, Wisconsin.

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ESA001-00341

An endangered (IUCN) and federally endangered Higgins eye pearly mussel (Lampsilis higginsii) at the Genoa National Fish Hatchery, Genoa, Wisconsin.

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ESA001-00342

An endangered (IUCN) and federally endangered Higgins eye pearly mussel (Lampsilis higginsii) at the Genoa National Fish Hatchery, Genoa, Wisconsin.

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ESA001-00310

Critically endangered (IUCN) and federally endangered Cumberlandian combshell (Epioblasma brevidens). It has lures that look like fish eggs on top that are used to attract fish. When a fish strikes at the lures, the mussels then eject their larvae into the fish’s gills and are able to increase their distribution, even upstream. The Clinch River has more federally listed aquatic species than any river in North America, yet is threatened by pollution and habitat loss. Coal mining in the watershed now raises the threat even more.

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ESA001-00300

Critically endangered (IUCN) and federally endangered Cumberlandian combshell (Epioblasma brevidens). It has lures that look like fish eggs on top that are used to attract fish. When a fish strikes at the lures, the mussels then eject their larvae into the fish’s gills and are able to increase their distribution, even upstream. The Clinch River has more federally listed aquatic species than any river in North America, yet is threatened by pollution and habitat loss. Coal mining in the watershed now raises the threat even more.

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ESA001-00301

Critically endangered (IUCN) and federally endangered Cumberlandian combshell (Epioblasma brevidens). It has lures that look like fish eggs on top that are used to attract fish. When a fish strikes at the lures, the mussels then eject their larvae into the fish’s gills and are able to increase their distribution, even upstream. The Clinch River has more federally listed aquatic species than any river in North America, yet is threatened by pollution and habitat loss. Coal mining in the watershed now raises the threat even more.

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ESA001-00302

Critically endangered (IUCN) and federally endangered Cumberlandian combshell (Epioblasma brevidens). It has lures that look like fish eggs on top that are used to attract fish. When a fish strikes at the lures, the mussels then eject their larvae into the fish’s gills and are able to increase their distribution, even upstream. The Clinch River has more federally listed aquatic species than any river in North America, yet is threatened by pollution and habitat loss. Coal mining in the watershed now raises the threat even more.

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ESA001-00303

Critically endangered (IUCN) and federally endangered Cumberlandian combshell (Epioblasma brevidens). It has lures that look like fish eggs on top that are used to attract fish. When a fish strikes at the lures, the mussels then eject their larvae into the fish’s gills and are able to increase their distribution, even upstream. The Clinch River has more federally listed aquatic species than any river in North America, yet is threatened by pollution and habitat loss. Coal mining in the watershed now raises the threat even more.

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ESA001-00304

Critically endangered (IUCN) and federally endangered Cumberlandian combshell (Epioblasma brevidens). It has lures that look like fish eggs on top that are used to attract fish. When a fish strikes at the lures, the mussels then eject their larvae into the fish’s gills and are able to increase their distribution, even upstream. The Clinch River has more federally listed aquatic species than any river in North America, yet is threatened by pollution and habitat loss. Coal mining in the watershed now raises the threat even more.

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ESA001-00305

Critically endangered (IUCN) and federally endangered Cumberlandian combshell (Epioblasma brevidens). It has lures that look like fish eggs on top that are used to attract fish. When a fish strikes at the lures, the mussels then eject their larvae into the fish’s gills and are able to increase their distribution, even upstream. The Clinch River has more federally listed aquatic species than any river in North America, yet is threatened by pollution and habitat loss. Coal mining in the watershed now raises the threat even more.

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ESA001-00306

Critically endangered (IUCN) and federally endangered Cumberlandian combshell (Epioblasma brevidens). It has lures that look like fish eggs on top that are used to attract fish. When a fish strikes at the lures, the mussels then eject their larvae into the fish’s gills and are able to increase their distribution, even upstream. The Clinch River has more federally listed aquatic species than any river in North America, yet is threatened by pollution and habitat loss. Coal mining in the watershed now raises the threat even more.

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ESA001-00288

Critically endangered (IUCN) and federally endangered Cumberlandian combshell (Epioblasma brevidens) taken from the Clinch River near Sneedville. They have ball lures on top that are used to attract fish to come near. When a fish strikes at the lures, the freshwater mussels then eject their larvae into the fish’s gills and are able to increase their distribution that way.

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ESA001-00295

Critically endangered (IUCN) and federally endangered Cumberlandian combshell (Epioblasma brevidens) taken from the Clinch River near Sneedville. These mussels and many others are in danger of extinction due to habitat loss due such as impoundments and pollution. Pollution from coal mining in the Clinch River watershed is of special concern. The fine sedimentation that comes downstream from the mines is thought to impede mussel survival.

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ESA001-00296

Critically endangered (IUCN) and federally endangered Cumberlandian combshell (Epioblasma brevidens) taken from the Clinch River near Sneedville. These mussels and many others are in danger of extinction due to habitat loss due such as impoundments and pollution. Pollution from coal mining in the Clinch River watershed is of special concern. The fine sedimentation that comes downstream from the mines is thought to impede mussel survival.

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ESA001-00298

Critically endangered (IUCN) and federally endangered Cumberlandian combshell (Epioblasma brevidens) taken from the Clinch River near Sneedville. These mussels and many others are in danger of extinction due to habitat loss due such as impoundments and pollution. Pollution from coal mining in the Clinch River watershed is of special concern. The fine sedimentation that comes downstream from the mines is thought to impede mussel survival.

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ESA001-00299

Critically endangered (IUCN) and federally endangered Cumberlandian combshell (Epioblasma brevidens). It has lures that look like fish eggs on top that are used to attract fish. When a fish strikes at the lures, the mussels then eject their larvae into the fish’s gills and are able to increase their distribution, even upstream. The Clinch River has more federally listed aquatic species than any river in North America, yet is threatened by pollution and habitat loss. Coal mining in the watershed now raises the threat even more.

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ESA001-00254

Masked bobwhite quail (Colinus virginianus ridgwayi), an endangered (IUCN) and federally endangered species, at the Phoenix Zoo.

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ESA001-00246

Masked bobwhite quail (Colinus virginianus ridgwayi), an endangered (IUCN) and federally endangered species, at the Phoenix Zoo.

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ESA001-00247

Masked bobwhite quail (Colinus virginianus ridgwayi), an endangered (IUCN) and federally endangered species, at the Phoenix Zoo.

Photo: Julie Jensen Director of Marketing | WVC O: 866.800.7326 | D: 702.443.9249 | E: j.jensen@wvc.org

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