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ANI101-00179

A critically endangered, female Pirre harlequin frog (Atelopus glyphus,) at the Panama Amphibian Rescue and Conservation Project. This is a project designed to establish captive breeding populations of frogs at risk of extinction from the frog-killing Chrytrid fungus.

This species is highly susceptible to the fungus, so it has been brought in for captive breeding.

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ANI101-00180

A robber frog species (in the craugastor punctariolus series) at the Panama Amphibian Rescue and Conservation Project. This is a project designed to establish captive breeding populations of frogs at risk of extinction from the frog-killing Chrytrid fungus.

Shown are a female (larger) and a male.
This species is thought to be down to just two males and single female. Despite very intensive searches, the last wild individuals were seen in the wild in 2010.

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ANI101-00181

The underside of a robber frog species (in the craugastor punctariolus series) at the Panama Amphibian Rescue and Conservation Project. This is a project designed to establish captive breeding populations of frogs at risk of extinction from the frog-killing Chrytrid fungus.

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ANI101-00173

Endangered female and male toad mountain harlequin frogs (Atelopus certus) at the Panama Amphibian Rescue and Conservation Project. This is a project designed to establish captive breeding populations of frogs at risk of extinction from the frog-killing Chytrid fungus.

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ANI101-00174

Endangered male and female toad mountain harlequin frogs (Atelopus certus) at the Panama Amphibian Rescue and Conservation Project. This is a project designed to establish captive breeding populations of frogs at risk of extinction from the frog-killing Chytrid fungus.

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ANI101-00175

An endangered female toad mountain harlequin frog (Atelopus certus) at the Panama Amphibian Rescue and Conservation Project. This is a project designed to establish captive breeding populations of frogs at risk of extinction from the frog-killing Chytrid fungus.

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ANI101-00176

A male robber frog (in the Craugastor punctariolus series) at the Panama Amphibian Rescue and Conservation Project. This is a project designed to establish captive breeding populations of frogs at risk of extinction from the frog-killing Chytrid fungus.

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ANI101-00177

A robber frog (in the Craugastor punctariolus series) at the Panama Amphibian Rescue and Conservation Project. This is a project designed to establish captive breeding populations of frogs at risk of extinction from the frog-killing Chytrid fungus.

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ANI101-00178

A male robber frog (in the Craugastor punctariolus series) at the Panama Amphibian Rescue and Conservation Project. This is a project designed to establish captive breeding populations of frogs at risk of extinction from the frog-killing Chytrid fungus.

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ANI101-00167

Chevron patter color morph of the Limosa harlequin frog (Atelopus limosus) at the Panama Amphibian Rescue and Conservation Project. The male is smaller than the female. This is a project designed to establish captive breeding populations of frogs at risk of extinction from the frog-killing Chytrid fungus.

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ANI101-00168

Chevron patter color morph of the Limosa harlequin frog (Atelopus limosus) at the Panama Amphibian Rescue and Conservation Project. The male is smaller than the female. This is a project designed to establish captive breeding populations of frogs at risk of extinction from the frog-killing Chytrid fungus.

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ANI101-00169

Chevron patter color morph of the Limosa harlequin frog (Atelopus limosus) at the Panama Amphibian Rescue and Conservation Project. The male is smaller than the female. This is a project designed to establish captive breeding populations of frogs at risk of extinction from the frog-killing Chytrid fungus.

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ANI101-00170

Geminisa’s dart frog (Andinobates geminisae) at the Panama Amphibian Rescue and Conservation Project.

This species occurs in a limited distribution in central Panama.

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ANI101-00171

Vicente’s poison frog (Oophaga vicentei) at the Panama Amphibian Rescue and Conservation Project. This is a project designed to establish captive breeding populations of frogs at risk of extinction from the frog-killing Chytrid fungus.

This is an arboreal species from a restricted habitat in central Panama. They have such a small distribution because of rainforest destruction.

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ANI101-00172

A critically endangered, female Pirre harlequin frog (Atelopus glyphus,) at the Panama Amphibian Rescue and Conservation Project. This is a project designed to establish captive breeding populations of frogs at risk of extinction from the frog-killing Chytrid fungus.

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ANI101-00161

The critically endangered, Pirre harlequin frog (Atelopus glyphus) at the Panama Amphibian Rescue and Conservation Project. The male is smaller. This is a project designed to establish captive breeding populations of frogs at risk of extinction from the frog-killing Chytrid fungus.

The male is smaller and darker with small yellow spots.

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ANI101-00162

The critically endangered, Pirre harlequin frog (Atelopus glyphus) at the Panama Amphibian Rescue and Conservation Project. The male is smaller. This is a project designed to establish captive breeding populations of frogs at risk of extinction from the frog-killing Chytrid fungus.

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ANI101-00163

The critically endangered, Pirre harlequin frog (Atelopus glyphus) at the Panama Amphibian Rescue and Conservation Project. The male is smaller. This is a project designed to establish captive breeding populations of frogs at risk of extinction from the frog-killing Chytrid fungus.

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ANI101-00164

Brown color morph of the Limosa harlequin frog (Atelopus limosus) at the Panama Amphibian Rescue and Conservation Project. This is a project designed to establish captive breeding populations of frogs at risk of extinction from the frog-killing Chytrid fungus.

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ANI101-00165

Brown color morph of the Limosa harlequin frog (Atelopus limosus) at the Panama Amphibian Rescue and Conservation Project. This is a project designed to establish captive breeding populations of frogs at risk of extinction from the frog-killing Chytrid fungus.

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ANI101-00166

Brown color morph of the Limosa harlequin frog (Atelopus limosus) at the Panama Amphibian Rescue and Conservation Project. This is a project designed to establish captive breeding populations of frogs at risk of extinction from the frog-killing Chytrid fungus.

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ONA007-00143

Brian Gratwicke of The Panama Amphibian Rescue and Conservation Project. This project is designed to establish captive breeding populations of frogs at risk of extinction from the frog-killing Chrytrid fungus.

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ANI101-00057

A male of the chevron pattern color morph of the endangered Limosa harlequin frog (Atelopus limosus) at the Panama Amphibian Rescue and Conservation Project. This is a project designed to establish captive breeding populations of frogs at risk of extinction from the frog-killing Chryttrid fungus.

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ANI101-00058

A Geminisa’s dart frog (Andinobates geminisae) at the Panama Amphibian Rescue and Conservation Project. This species occurs in a limited distribution in central Panama.

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ANI101-00059

A Vicente’s poison frog (Oophaga vicentei) at the Panama Amphibian Rescue and Conservation Project. This is a project designed to establish captive breeding populations of frogs at risk of extinction from the frog-killing Chryttrid fungus. This is an arboreal species from a restricted habitat in central Panama. They have such a small distribution because of rainforest destruction.

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ANI101-00060

Endangered Toad mountain harlequin frogs (Atelopus certus) in amplexus at the Panama Amphibian Rescue and Conservation Project. This is a project designed to establish captive breeding populations of frogs at risk of extinction from the frog-killing Chrytrid fungus. This species is thought to be highly threatened by the fungus, so it has been brought into captive breeding programs.

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ANI101-00053

Two critically endangered Pirri harlequin frogs (Atelopus glyphus) at the Panama Amphibian Rescue and Conservation Project.

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ANI101-00054

Two critically endangered Pirri harlequin frogs (Atelopus glyphus) at the Panama Amphibian Rescue and Conservation Project.

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ANI101-00055

Brown color morph of the endangered Limosa harlequin frog (Atelopus limosus) at the Panama Amphibian Rescue and Conservation Project. This is a project designed to establish captive breeding populations of frogs at risk of extinction from the frog-killing Chryttrid fungus. This species is highly susceptible to the fungus and has declined through most of its range in central Panama, where it is endemic. This is the brown color form. It’s now extremely rare to see one in the wild.

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ANI101-00056

Chevron pattern color morph of the endangerd Limosa harlequin frog (Atelopus limosus) at the Panama Amphibian Rescue and Conservation Project.

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ANI078-00500

An extinct splendid poison frog (Oophaga speciosa) preserved in alcohol at the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute in Gamboa, Panama.

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ANI078-00501

Extinct Chiriqui harlequin frogs (Atelopus chiriquiensis) preserved in alcohol at the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute in Gamboa, Panama.

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ANI078-00502

Two extinct frog species, a Chiriqui harlequin frog (Atelopus chiriquiensis) and a splendid poison frog (Oophaga speciosa) at the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute in Gamboa, Panama.

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ANI078-00503

A man checks on the frogs at the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute in Gamboa, Panama.

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ANI078-00499

Hundreds of endangered Toad Mountain harlequin froglets (Atelopus certus) explore their new home inside a plexiglass rearing tank at the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute in Gamboa, Panama. The outside of the tank is covered in transparent labels, each indicating the date the froglets emerged from the water, as well as their parentage.

Photo: Julie Jensen Director of Marketing | WVC O: 866.800.7326 | D: 702.443.9249 | E: j.jensen@wvc.org

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