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ANI078-00338

An endangered, mint morph, male terrible poison dart frog (Phyllobates terribilis) from a private collection. The male carries several tadpoles on his back. In the wild, males carry tadpoles to places where they can grow protected from predators. Often, they use the pools of water that collect in bromeliad plants, high in trees.

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ANI040-00387

Endangered (IUCN) and federally endangered Francois’ langurs (Trachypithecus francoisi) at Omaha Henry Doorly Zoo. This species exhibits ‘aunting’ behavior, meaning several females will take care of the same baby. The bright orange coloration (which disappears by age six months) is thought to allow for easy tracking of the young one no matter which surrogate mom has it at any time.

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ANI040-00306

Endangered (IUCN) and federally endangered Francois’ langurs (Trachypithecus francoisi) at Omaha Henry Doorly Zoo. This species exhibits ‘aunting’ behavior, meaning several females will take care of the same baby. The bright orange coloration (which disappears by age six months) is thought to allow for easy tracking of the young one no matter which surrogate mom has it at any time.

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ANI040-00236

Endangered (IUCN) and federally endangered Francois’ langurs (Trachypithecus francoisi) at the Omaha Zoo. These monkeys are good jumpers. When they’re born, they’re bright orange for the first three or four months. They’re also good at ‘aunting’, meaning various females care for other’s babies.

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ANI040-00213

Endangered (IUCN) and federally endangered Francois langurs (Trachypithecus francoisi) at the Omaha Zoo.These monkeys are good jumpers. When they’re born, they’re bright orange for the first three or four months. They’re also good at ‘aunting’, meaning various females care for other’s babies.

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ANI040-00214

Endangered (IUCN) and federally endangered Francois langurs (Trachypithecus francoisi) at the Omaha Zoo.These monkeys are good jumpers. When they’re born, they’re bright orange for the first three or four months. They’re also good at ‘aunting’, meaning various females care for other’s babies.

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ANI040-00215

Endangered (IUCN) and federally endangered Francois langurs (Trachypithecus francoisi) at the Omaha Zoo.These monkeys are good jumpers. When they’re born, they’re bright orange for the first three or four months. They’re also good at ‘aunting’, meaning various females care for other’s babies.

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BIR033-00559

Endangered (US and IUCN) golden-cheeked warblers (Dendroica chrysoparia) Killeen, Texas.

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BIR045-00047

King quail, (Synoicus chinensis) also known as Chinese Painted Quail, at Parrots in Paradise, a bird attraction in Glass House Mountains, Queensland.

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BIR045-00046

King quail, (Synoicus chinensis) also known as Chinese Painted Quail, at Parrots in Paradise, a bird attraction in Glass House Mountains, Queensland.

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ANI078-00347

An endangered mint morph of the terrible poison dart frog (Phyllobates terriblis) from a private collection. This is a male and on his back are several tadpoles, which he carries until he can find a suitable wet place to drop them off so they can develop into young frogs. In the wild this would be inside water-filled bromeliad plants high up in trees and away from predators. Some tropical amphibians carry their tadpoles to water.

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ANI078-00335

An endangered, mint morph, male terrible poison dart frog (Phyllobates terribilis) from a private collection. The male carries several tadpoles on his back. In the wild, males carry tadpoles to places where they can grow protected from predators. Often, they use the pools of water that collect in bromeliad plants, high in trees.

Photo

ANI078-00336

An endangered, mint morph, male terrible poison dart frog (Phyllobates terribilis) from a private collection. The male carries several tadpoles on his back. In the wild, males carry tadpoles to places where they can grow protected from predators. Often, they use the pools of water that collect in bromeliad plants, high in trees.

Photo

ANI078-00337

An endangered, mint morph, male terrible poison dart frog (Phyllobates terribilis) from a private collection. The male carries several tadpoles on his back. In the wild, males carry tadpoles to places where they can grow protected from predators. Often, they use the pools of water that collect in bromeliad plants, high in trees.

Photo

ANI078-00339

An endangered, mint morph, male terrible poison dart frog (Phyllobates terribilis) from a private collection. The male carries several tadpoles on his back. In the wild, males carry tadpoles to places where they can grow protected from predators. Often, they use the pools of water that collect in bromeliad plants, high in trees.

Photo

ANI078-00333

An endangered, mint morph, male terrible poison dart frog (Phyllobates terribilis) from a private collection. The male carries several tadpoles on his back. In the wild, males carry tadpoles to places where they can grow protected from predators. Often, they use the pools of water that collect in bromeliad plants, high in trees.

Photo

ANI078-00334

An endangered, mint morph, male terrible poison dart frog (Phyllobates terribilis) from a private collection. The male carries several tadpoles on his back. In the wild, males carry tadpoles to places where they can grow protected from predators. Often, they use the pools of water that collect in bromeliad plants, high in trees.

Photo

ESA001-00159

A prodigy of adaptation, the endangered least tern (Sterna albifrons) survived the test of evolution by nesting on barren sandbars, protected from predators by the swift flow of surrounding rivers. These moated habitats are created by naturally occurring spring floods, which humans now spend millions to prevent.

Photo: Julie Jensen Director of Marketing | WVC O: 866.800.7326 | D: 702.443.9249 | E: j.jensen@wvc.org

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