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A horse walking through a field from the rider’s point of view.

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A California sea lion (Zalophus californianus) with its trainer at the Houston Zoo.

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Retirees frolic in a pool at the Fun N Sun Resort in San Benito, one of many border communities that attract “winter Texans” from the north every fall.

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Sisters with rainbow colored hairstyles with glitter at the Minnesota state fair.

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A musk ox bull (Ovibos moschatus) charges at Joel Sartore, on Nunivak Island, Alaska. These animals descended from stock brought in from Greenland in 1935.

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The rodeo princess poses with her horses at the Lemhi county fair in Salmon, Idaho.

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A tourist films a replica of the desk in the Oval office in Boston, Massachusetts.

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A Marine soldier cradles a little boy in a Florida city relief camp after hurricane Andrew.

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A young girl holds up before and after drawings of her house after hurricane Andrew destroyed it.

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Central newts (Notophthalmus viridescens louisianensis) with southern leopard frog (Rana sphenocephala) eggs, a favorite food source, at Bennett Springs State Park near Lebanon, Missouri.

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Central newts (Notophthalmus viridescens louisianensis) with southern leopard frog (Rana sphenocephala) eggs, a favorite food source, at Bennett Springs State Park near Lebanon, Missouri.

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A rough green snake (Opheodrys aestivus) along Snake Road in Shawnee National forest in southwest Illinios.

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Millions of monarch butterflies (Danaus plexippus) roost on the Sierra Chincua (Chincua mountain) near Angangueo, Mexico. This is one of five wintering roosts for monarchs, where the cool mountain climate slows their metabolism enough for them to overwinter before migrating back northward in the spring. Logging threatens this spectacle: already one of the five sites is no longer used by the butterflies due to the forest being cleared.

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Monarchs (Danaus plexippus) in the Sierra Chincua sanctuary, Mexico.

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Millions of monarch butterflies (Danaus plexippus) roost on the Sierra Chincua (Chincua mountain) near Angangueo, Mexico. This is one of five wintering roosts for monarchs, where the cool mountain climate slows their metabolism enough for them to overwinter before migrating back northward in the spring. Logging threatens this spectacle: already one of the five sites is no longer used by the butterflies due to the forest being cleared.

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A lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush) caught in a net by fishermen in Lake Pend Oreille, Idaho.

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Red-headed woodpeckers (Melanerpes erythrocephalus) feed their young high in the forest canopy at Spring Creek Prairie near Denton, Nebraska.

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Red-headed woodpeckers (Melanerpes erythrocephalus) feed their young high in the forest canopy at Spring Creek Prairie near Denton, Nebraska.

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Cliff swallows (Petrochelidon pyrrhonota) flying into their mud nests under a county bridge near Raymond, Nebraska.

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An interior least tern (Sterna antillarum), a federally endangered species, on its nest at the Western Sand and Gravel mine along the Platte River near Fremont, NE. Many mine companies are pausing work during the nesting season in areas this bird and other rare species use.

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Cliff swallows (Petrochelidon pyrrhonota) flying into their mud nests under a county bridge near Raymond, Nebraska.

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A mountain goat (Oreamnos americanus) walks along a mountain in Glacier National Park, Montana.

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Red-headed woodpeckers (Melanerpes erythrocephalus) feed their young high in the forest canopy at Spring Creek Prairie near Denton, Nebraska.

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Red-headed woodpeckers (Melanerpes erythrocephalus) feed their young high in the forest canopy at Spring Creek Prairie near Denton, Nebraska.

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Thousands of sandhill cranes (Grus canadensis) roost on the Platte River during their annual migratory stopover at the Rowe Audubon Sanctuary near Gibbon, NE. With water in the river fully appropriated for urban areas and agriculture, many wonder how long it will be until the river runs dry. Some 600,000 to 800,000 cranes use just a few miles of the river in central Nebraska–areas that have been been mechanically cleared of the woody vegetation that the birds can’t tolerate.

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A crew working to clean a brown pelican (Pelecanus occidentalis) at the rehab center in Fort Jackson, Louisiana. This is where the majority of the oiled birds were brought in from the deep water horizon oil spill.

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A crew working to clean a brown pelican (Pelecanus occidentalis) at the rehab center in Fort Jackson, Louisiana. This is where the majority of the oiled birds were brought in from the deep water horizon oil spill.

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A crew working to clean a brown pelican (Pelecanus occidentalis) at the rehab center in Fort Jackson, Louisiana. This is where the majority of the oiled birds were brought in from the deep water horizon oil spill.

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A crew working to clean a pelican at the rehab center in Fort Jackson, Louisiana. This is where the majority of the oiled birds were brought in from the deep water horizon oil spill.

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Workers washing an oiled brown pelican (Pelecanus occidentalis) at the rehab center in Fort Jackson, Louisiana. This is where the majority of the oiled birds were brought in from the deep water horizon oil spill.

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A crew working to clean a brown pelican (Pelecanus occidentalis) at the rehab center in Fort Jackson, Louisiana. This is where the majority of the oiled birds were brought in from the deep water horizon oil spill.

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A crew of BP contract workers remove booms saturated with oil from the Deepwater Horizon spill from important bird breeding habitat in the Gulf of Mexico.

Photo: Julie Jensen Director of Marketing | WVC O: 866.800.7326 | D: 702.443.9249 | E: j.jensen@wvc.org

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