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INV002-00314

Appalachian brook crayfish, Cambarus bartonii cavatus, at the Crayfish lab in West Liberty University in West Liberty, WV.

This specimen is from Ohio.

The black on this animal is manganese that has encrusted all over its body. Manganese is a pollutant from coal mining runoff in rivers and streams. Crayfish and mussels are often killed by the toxic sediments that cover the bottoms of rivers downstream from coal mines. Stream sedimentation is the number one cause of crayfish imperilment, and crayfish are the fourth most imperiled animal group on the planet.

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INV002-00313

Appalachian brook crayfish, Cambarus bartonii cavatus, at the Crayfish lab in West Liberty University in West Liberty, WV.

This specimen is from Ohio.

The black on this animal is manganese that has encrusted all over its body. Manganese is a pollutant from coal mining runoff in rivers and streams. Crayfish and mussels are often killed by the toxic sediments that cover the bottoms of rivers downstream from coal mines. Stream sedimentation is the number one cause of crayfish imperilment, and crayfish are the fourth most imperiled animal group on the planet.

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INV002-00312

Appalachian brook crayfish, Cambarus bartonii cavatus, at the Crayfish lab in West Liberty University in West Liberty, WV.

This specimen is from Ohio.

The black on this animal is manganese that has encrusted all over its body. Manganese is a pollutant from coal mining runoff in rivers and streams. Crayfish and mussels are often killed by the toxic sediments that cover the bottoms of rivers downstream from coal mines. Stream sedimentation is the number one cause of crayfish imperilment, and crayfish are the fourth most imperiled animal group on the planet.

Photo

INV002-00311

Appalachian brook crayfish, Cambarus bartonii cavatus, at the Crayfish lab in West Liberty University in West Liberty, WV.

This specimen is from Ohio.

The black on this animal is manganese that has encrusted all over its body. Manganese is a pollutant from coal mining runoff in rivers and streams. Crayfish and mussels are often killed by the toxic sediments that cover the bottoms of rivers downstream from coal mines. Stream sedimentation is the number one cause of crayfish imperilment, and crayfish are the fourth most imperiled animal group on the planet.

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West Liberty University Common crayfish

Appalachian brook crayfish, Cambarus bartonii cavatus, at the Crayfish lab in West Liberty University in West Liberty, WV.

This specimen is from Ohio.

The black on this animal is manganese that has encrusted all over its body. Manganese is a pollutant from coal mining runoff in rivers and streams. Crayfish and mussels are often killed by the toxic sediments that cover the bottoms of rivers downstream from coal mines. Stream sedimentation is the number one cause of crayfish imperilment, and crayfish are the fourth most imperiled animal group on the planet.

Photo

West Liberty University Common crayfish

Appalachian brook crayfish, Cambarus bartonii cavatus, at the Crayfish lab in West Liberty University in West Liberty, WV.

This specimen is from Ohio.

The black on this animal is manganese that has encrusted all over its body. Manganese is a pollutant from coal mining runoff in rivers and streams. Crayfish and mussels are often killed by the toxic sediments that cover the bottoms of rivers downstream from coal mines. Stream sedimentation is the number one cause of crayfish imperilment, and crayfish are the fourth most imperiled animal group on the planet.

Photo

West Liberty University Common crayfish

Appalachian brook crayfish, Cambarus bartonii cavatus, at the Crayfish lab in West Liberty University in West Liberty, WV.

This specimen is from Ohio.

The black on this animal is manganese that has encrusted all over its body. Manganese is a pollutant from coal mining runoff in rivers and streams. Crayfish and mussels are often killed by the toxic sediments that cover the bottoms of rivers downstream from coal mines. Stream sedimentation is the number one cause of crayfish imperilment, and crayfish are the fourth most imperiled animal group on the planet.

Photo

West Liberty University Common crayfish

Appalachian brook crayfish, Cambarus bartonii cavatus, at the Crayfish lab in West Liberty University in West Liberty, WV.

This specimen is from Ohio.

The black on this animal is manganese that has encrusted all over its body. Manganese is a pollutant from coal mining runoff in rivers and streams. Crayfish and mussels are often killed by the toxic sediments that cover the bottoms of rivers downstream from coal mines. Stream sedimentation is the number one cause of crayfish imperilment, and crayfish are the fourth most imperiled animal group on the planet.

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ENV021-00084

A dead black drum as it floats through oiled waters near Grand Isle, LA.

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A forest ranger looks at heavy metal residue in Bucktail creek at Salmon National Forest in Idaho. The slag comes from nearby Blackbird mine, closed in the 1960’s.

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A copper-tailings impoundment next to a housing development in Arizona threatens leeching of chemicals into groundwater as seen in the sulfide-tinged pool of rainwater.

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ENV007-00030

A crucifixion statue in Holy Rosary Cemetery overlooks petrochemical plants massed upriver from New Orleans to Baton Rouge, Louisiana. High rates of malignancy among local residents have dubbed the region Cancer Alley.

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ENV013-00049

Workers observe water spilling from a gas well in Wyoming.

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A worker samples water and drilling mud coming from a rig at a coal bed methane drill site near Buffalo, WY. The fluid goes to a pond and at this well, it is recirculated.

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A worker samples water and drilling mud coming from a rig at a coal bed methane drill site near Buffalo, WY. The fluid goes to a pond and at this well, it is recirculated.

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ENV013-00052

Water and drilling mud spill from a rig near Buffalo, WY. At this site, the fluid is recirculated after it settles in the pond shown here.

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A worker samples water and drilling mud coming from a rig at a coal bed methane drill site near Buffalo, WY. The fluid goes to a pond and at this well, it is recirculated.

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ESA001-00091

A mussel shows off coal fines, the sediments from Virginia’s coal mines that wash into the rivers of Tennessee. It is thought that coal fines and the use of heavy industrial chemicals to clean coal in Viriginia are both major factors in the disappearance of rare Mussels in the Clinch and Powell Rivers, two of the last places where many rare mussels were found.

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ESA001-00092

A mussel shows off coal fines, the sediments from Virginia’s coal mines that wash into the rivers of Tennessee. It is thought that coal fines and the use of heavy industrial chemicals to clean coal in Viriginia are both major factors in the disappearance of rare Mussels in the Clinch and Powell Rivers, two of the last places where many rare mussels were found.

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Plastic garbage washed up by the tide in Equatorial Guinea.

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ENV018-00007

Advanced Bioenergy, an ethanol plant near Fairmont, NE.

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Advanced Bioenergy, an ethanol plant near Fairmont, NE.

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Advanced Bioenergy, an ethanol plant near Fairmont, NE.

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Advanced Bioenergy, an ethanol plant near Fairmont, NE.

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Advanced Bioenergy, an ethanol plant near Fairmont, NE.

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Advanced Bioenergy, an ethanol plant near Fairmont, NE.

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Advanced Bioenergy, an ethanol plant near Fairmont, NE.

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ESA001-00010

Portraits of “Orange”, the last dusky seaside sparrow (Ammodramus maritimus nigriscens). This species went extinct in 1987, after their last habitats in northeast Florida were ruined by man, from the construction of an expressway to mosquito spraying. This bird is kept in a vial of alcohol in the Florida Museum of Natural History at the University of Florida.

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ENV003-00096

DC3 planes blanket housing developments in marsh areas with a mixture of diesel fuel and malathion to kill off mosquitoes.

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Cleanup work on an oil spill in the Texas Intercoastal Canal, using a “control boom”.

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Cleanup work on an oil spill in the Texas Intercoastal Canal, using a “control boom”.

Photo: Julie Jensen Director of Marketing | WVC O: 866.800.7326 | D: 702.443.9249 | E: j.jensen@wvc.org

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