Photo

WOL003-00087

Wild gray wolf hunting elk in Yellowstone National Park.

Photo

WOL003-00064

Wild gray wolf in Yellowstone National Park’s Lamar Valley. (Nez Perce Pack)

Photo

WOL003-00060

Wild gray wolves prey on elk in Yellowstone National Park’s Lamar Valley.

Photo

WOL003-00059

A wild gray wolf and carcass in Yellowstone National Park.

Photo

WOL003-00049

Wild gray wolves prey on elk in Yellowstone National Park’s Lamar Valley.

Photo

WOL003-00027

Wild gray wolves (Members of the Druid Peak Pack) prey on elk in Yellowstone National Park’s Lamar Valley.

Photo

BIR021-00016

The gyrfalcon is one of the fastest animals on earth and a very effective predator.

Photo

BIR021-00015

The gyrfalcon is one of the fastest animals on earth and a very effective predator.

Photo

BIR021-00013

The gyrfalcon is one of the fastest animals on earth and a very effective predator.

Photo

BIR021-00014

The gyrfalcon is one of the fastest animals on earth and a very effective predator.

Photo

BIR002-00039

A bald eagle fishes at Lake McConaughy near Ogallala, Nebraska.

Photo

BEA009-00021

Grizzly bear in the wild in Yellowstone National Park.

Photo

BEA009-00007

Grizzly bear chasing bison in the wild of Yellowstone National Park.

Photo

BEA009-00008

Grizzly bear in the wild in Yellowstone National Park.

Photo

BEA009-00006

Grizzly bear and bison in the wild of Yellowstone National Park.

Photo

BEA009-00005

A grizzly chasing bison in the wild in Yellowstone National Park.

Photo

APC004-00017

A heat lamp serves as a surrogate mother for this juvenile Attwater’s prairie-chicken at the Fossil Rim Wildlife Center. Though captive breeding has saved the bird from certain extinction, without wild parents to teach young birds the dangers of predation, the future is still very uncertain.

Photo

APC004-00015

Eggs in the incubator at the Fossil Rim Wildlife Center.

Photo

APC004-00008

Just hatched, an exhausted Attwater’s prairie-chicken restsin the hands of a biologist after freeing itself from its egg in the Fossil Rim Wildlife Center’s incubator room.

Photo

APC004-00006

A young Attwater’s prairie-chicken (endangered) huddles in the grass, surveying its new surroundings near Texas City, TX.

Photo

APC004-00007

A heat lamp serves as a surrogate mother for this juvenile Attwater’s prairie-chicken at the Fossil Rim Wildlife Center. Captive breeding efforts are the species’ only hope for survival.

Photo

APC004-00005

A young Attwater’s prairie-chicken (endangered) huddles in the grass, surveying its new surroundings near Texas City, TX.

Photo

APC004-00004

A month old Attwater’s chick naps in the sun at Fossil Rim Wildlife Center.

Photo

APC004-00002

A heat lamp serves as a surrogate mother for this juvenile Attwater’s prairie-chicken at the Fossil Rim Wildlife Center. Captive breeding efforts are the species’ only hope for survival.

Photo

APC004-00003

Just hatched, an exhausted Attwater’s prairie-chicken restsafter freeing itself from its egg in the Fossil Rim Wildlife Center’s incubator room.

Photo

APC004-00001

This captive-born chick resting in the hands of a biologist represents the last hope for the Attwater’s prairie-chicken. The species which used to number over a million strong is now down to a few dozen, holding out in small islands of Texas coastal prairie.

Photo

APC003-00003

Close-up of an endangered male Attwater’s prairie- chicken,killed by a Cooper’s hawk. Predation is a normal part of healthy ecosystems, but shrinking habitat creates a problem when birds like the APC have no place to hide.

Photo

APC003-00002

This Attwater’s prairie chicken wasn’t strong enough to free itself from its egg at the Fossil Rim Wildlife Center. Biologists must let nature take its course to keep the population as strong as possible.

Photo

APC002-00003

A female Attwater’s prairie chicken (endangered) telescopesher head above the grass as she moves out of the pen and into the wild coastal prairie. She and her chicks were killed by predators less than two weeks later.

Photo

APC003-00001

Predators have coexisted for centuries with the Attwater’s prairie-chicken. In recent decades, shrinking habitat has left the grouse nowhere to hide, making predation a significant problem.

Photo

APC002-00002

A female Attwater’s prairie chicken sits on her clutch of eggs at a captive breeding pen at the Fossil Rim Wildlife Center.

Photo

APC002-00001

A captive-born mother and chick wait in the safety of a pre-release pen. Once they ventured out into the wild, however, the mother was killed within two weeks by a raptor.

Photo

ANI006-00034

The remains of an elk killed by wild gray wolves in Yellowstone National Park’s Lamar Valley.

Photo

ANI006-00026

The remains of an elk killed by wild gray wolves in Yellowstone National Park.

Photo: Julie Jensen Director of Marketing | WVC O: 866.800.7326 | D: 702.443.9249 | E: j.jensen@wvc.org

Speaking Engagements

Joel is a popular keynote speaker with conservation, corporate, and civic groups.

Hire him to entertain and inspire your audience.

Book Joel To Speak

The Photo Ark

Joel is the founder of the Photo Ark, a groundbreaking effort to document every species in captivity before it’s too late.

Explore the Photo Ark

Visit Our Store

Every purchase goes directly to support our mission: getting the public to care and helping to save species from extinction.

Help Us Build the Ark