Photo

INS006-00428

An oreo spider (Cyclocosmia latusicosta) from a private collection. The members of this genus are living fossils. Its abdomen ends with a strong disc of reinforced ribs and grooves, it uses this hardened disc to defend its burrow from intruders.

Photo

INS006-00427

A trapdoor spider (Sinothela sinensis) from a private collection. Trapdoor spiders are a different family than tarantulas. This is one of the oldest known kinds of spider on the planet. Biologists note the segmented abdomen as evidence of its ancient provenance.

Photo

INS006-00426

A trapdoor spider (Sinothela sinensis) from a private collection. Trapdoor spiders are a different family than tarantulas. This is one of the oldest known kinds of spider on the planet. Biologists note the segmented abdomen as evidence of its ancient provenance.

Photo

INS006-00425

A bumblebee tarantula (Neoholothele fasciaaurinigra) from a private collection.

Photo

INS006-00424

A bumblebee tarantula (Neoholothele fasciaaurinigra) from a private collection.

Photo

INS006-00423

An Amazon slender leg tarantula (Maraca horrida) from a private collection.

Photo

INS006-00422

An Amazon slender leg tarantula (Maraca horrida) from a private collection.

Photo

INS006-00421

A lesser baboon spider (Harpactirella lightfooti) from a private collection. This species is native to South Africa. This small spider is highly venomous.

Photo

INS006-00420

A lesser baboon spider (Harpactirella lightfooti) from a private collection. This species is native to South Africa. This small spider is highly venomous.

Photo

INS006-00419

Two Costa Rican redleg tarantulas (Megaphobema mesomelas) from a private collection. The male is smaller.

Photo

INS006-00418

Two Costa Rican redleg tarantulas (Megaphobema mesomelas) from a private collection. The male is smaller.

Photo

INS006-00417

An Asian tarantula (Haplocosmia himalayana) from a private collection.

Photo

INS006-00416

An Asian tarantula (Haplocosmia himalayana) from a private collection.

Photo

INS006-00415

An undescribed tarantula species from Columbia (Pseudhapalopus sp. Blue) from a private collection.

Photo

INS006-00414

An undescribed tarantula species from Columbia (Pseudhapalopus sp. Blue) from a private collection.

Photo

INS006-00413

A tarantula (Ceratogyrus hillyardi) from a private collection. This genus is native to southern Africa. This genus is known to have horns, however, this is one of two species in this genus that is hornless.

Photo

INS006-00412

A tarantula (Ceratogyrus hillyardi) from a private collection. This genus is native to southern Africa. This genus is known to have horns, however, this is one of two species in this genus that is hornless.

Photo

INS006-00411

A tarantula (Harpactira dictator) from a private collection. This species lives in burrows that it digs and lines with silk. It hunts by lying at the entrance to its burrow.

Photo

INS006-00410

A tarantula (Harpactira dictator) from a private collection. This species lives in burrows that it digs and lines with silk. It hunts by lying at the entrance to its burrow.

Photo

INS006-00409

A (Phormingochilus everetti) from a private collection.

Photo

INS006-00408

A (Phormingochilus everetti) from a private collection.

Photo

INS006-00407

A tarantula (Grammostola anthracina) from a private collection.

Photo

INS006-00406

A tarantula (Grammostola anthracina) from a private collection.

Photo

INS006-00405

A tarantula (Phormingochilus everetti) from a private collection. This large tree-dwelling spider species lives in the cavities of trees high above the ground. After mating the female will eat the male. This usually signifies a successful mating.

Photo

INS006-00404

A tarantula (Phormingochilus everetti) from a private collection. This large tree-dwelling spider species lives in the cavities of trees high above the ground. After mating the female will eat the male. This usually signifies a successful mating.

Photo

INS006-00403

A cinnamon tarantula (Crassicrus lamanai) from a private collection. This species is nicknamed the ‘antelope spider’ based on the misconception that its enlarged hind legs allow them to jump long distances.

Photo

INS006-00402

A Costa Rican pink-footed tarantula (Sericopelma melanotarsum) from a private collection.

Photo

INS006-00401

A Costa Rican pink-footed tarantula (Sericopelma melanotarsum) from a private collection.

Photo

INS006-00400

A tarantula (Monocentropus lambertoni) from a private collection. This species, native to India, is now extinct in the wild.

Photo

INS006-00399

A tarantula (Monocentropus lambertoni) from a private collection. This species, native to India, is now extinct in the wild.

Photo

INS006-00398

A yellow-backed ornamental tarantula, Poecilotheria smithi, from a private collection. This species, native to India, is now extinct in the wild.

Photo

INS006-00397

A yellow-backed ornamental tarantula, Poecilotheria smithi, from a private collection. This species, native to India, is now extinct in the wild.

Photo

FIS031-00123

A Jack Dempsey cichlid (Rocio octofasciata) from a private collection.

Photo

FIS031-00122

A Jack Dempsey cichlid (Rocio octofasciata) from a private collection.

Photo

FIS031-00121

A Jack Dempsey cichlid (Rocio octofasciata) from a private collection.

Photo

FIS031-00120

A critically endangered male saulosi cichlid (Chindongo saulosi) from a private collection.

Photo: Julie Jensen Director of Marketing | WVC O: 866.800.7326 | D: 702.443.9249 | E: j.jensen@wvc.org

Speaking Engagements

Joel is a popular keynote speaker with conservation, corporate, and civic groups.

Hire him to entertain and inspire your audience.

Book Joel To Speak

The Photo Ark

Joel is the founder of the Photo Ark, a groundbreaking effort to document every species in captivity before it’s too late.

Explore the Photo Ark

Visit Our Store

Every purchase goes directly to support our mission: getting the public to care and helping to save species from extinction.

Help Us Build the Ark