Photo

ENV021-00021

A brown pelican (Pelecanus occidentalis), covered with oil from the Deepwater Horizon spill, on Queen Bess Island in Barataria Bay, Louisiana. The bird was taken to a rehab center.

Photo

ENV021-00002

Oil booms ring Cat island to protect it from the Deepwater Horizon spill. The island is an important bird rookery, in Barataria Bay, Louisiana.

Photo

ENV021-00007

A BP clean up crew tries to sop oil from the Deepwater Horizon spill at Queen Bess Island, Louisiana.

Photo

BIR015-00043

A piping plover (Charadrius melodus) guards her nest in Waterloo, Nebraska. (US: Endangered)

Photo

BIR015-00046

A piping plover (Charadrius melodus) guards her nest in Waterloo, Nebraska. (US: Endangered)

Photo

BIR015-00048

A piping plover (Charadrius melodus) guards her nest in Waterloo, Nebraska. (US: Endangered)

Photo

BIR023-00035

A vulnerable (IUCN) male lesser prairie-chicken (Tympanuchus pallidicinctus) that was caught in a walk-in trap to be radio collared. Lesser prairie-chicken numbers have declined drastically all through their limited range in the Southern Great Plains in recent years. Biologists fear that this species could be lost without habitat improvement such as the marking of fences that the birds often hit in flight, as well as the restriction of wind turbine farms that cause major disruption to the bird.

Photo

BIR023-00034

A vulnerable (IUCN) male lesser prairie-chicken (Tympanuchus pallidicinctus) that was caught in a walk-in trap to be radio collared. Lesser prairie-chicken numbers have declined drastically all through their limited range in the Southern Great Plains in recent years. Biologists fear that this species could be lost without habitat improvement such as the marking of fences that the birds often hit in flight, as well as the restriction of wind turbine farms that cause major disruption to the bird.

Photo

BIR023-00033

A vulnerable (IUCN) male lesser prairie-chicken (Tympanuchus pallidicinctus) that was caught in a walk-in trap to be radio collared. Lesser prairie-chicken numbers have declined drastically all through their limited range in the Southern Great Plains in recent years. Biologists fear that this species could be lost without habitat improvement such as the marking of fences that the birds often hit in flight, as well as the restriction of wind turbine farms that cause major disruption to the bird.

Photo

BIR023-00032

A vulnerable (IUCN) male lesser prairie-chicken (Tympanuchus pallidicinctus) that was caught in a walk-in trap to be radio collared. Lesser prairie-chicken numbers have declined drastically all through their limited range in the Southern Great Plains in recent years. Biologists fear that this species could be lost without habitat improvement such as the marking of fences that the birds often hit in flight, as well as the restriction of wind turbine farms that cause major disruption to the bird.

Photo

BIR023-00031

A vulnerable (IUCN) male lesser prairie-chicken (Tympanuchus pallidicinctus) that was caught in a walk-in trap to be radio collared. Lesser prairie-chicken numbers have declined drastically all through their limited range in the Southern Great Plains in recent years. Biologists fear that this species could be lost without habitat improvement such as the marking of fences that the birds often hit in flight, as well as the restriction of wind turbine farms that cause major disruption to the bird.

Photo

ANI024-00114

A hingeback tortoise (Kinixys homeana) from the Rolling Hills Wildlife Adventure. A hinge in its shells can close up to protect the animal’s rear end.

Photo

ANI024-00098

A hingeback tortoise (Kinixys homeana) from the Rolling Hills Wildlife Adventure. A hinge in its shells can close up to protect the animal’s rear end.

Photo

ANI024-00097

A hingeback tortoise (Kinixys homeana) from the Rolling Hills Wildlife Adventure. A hinge in its shells can close up to protect the animal’s rear end.

Photo

ANI024-00096

A hingeback tortoise (Kinixys homeana) from the Rolling Hills Wildlife Adventure. A hinge in its shells can close up to protect the animal’s rear end.

Photo

ANI024-00095

A hingeback tortoise (Kinixys homeana) from the Rolling Hills Wildlife Adventure. A hinge in its shells can close up to protect the animal’s rear end.

Photo: Julie Jensen Director of Marketing | WVC O: 866.800.7326 | D: 702.443.9249 | E: j.jensen@wvc.org

Speaking Engagements

Joel is a popular keynote speaker with conservation, corporate, and civic groups.

Hire him to entertain and inspire your audience.

Book Joel To Speak

The Photo Ark

Joel is the founder of the Photo Ark, a groundbreaking effort to document every species in captivity before it’s too late.

Explore the Photo Ark

Visit Our Store

Every purchase goes directly to support our mission: getting the public to care and helping to save species from extinction.

Help Us Build the Ark