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A wire fence keeps elk (Cervus canadensis) on Elk National refuge land and from roaming into the town of Jackson, Wyoming.

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Before a highway is widened here, botanists are dispatched to instruct workers on how to safeguard the threatened western prairie fringed orchid. On rare occasions roads have been diverted to save imperiled vegetation, whose advocates complain that the ESA grants far less protection to plants than to animals.

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Hit-and-run victims on Florida’s busy waterways, injured manatees maintain vital buoyancy only with the aid of inflatable wet suits at Orlando’s Sea World.

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A prodigy of adaptation, the endangered least tern (Sterna albifrons) survived the test of evolution by nesting on barren sandbars, protected from predators by the swift flow of surrounding rivers. These moated habitats are created by naturally occurring spring floods, which humans now spend millions to prevent.

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Police, seen through the windshield of a truck, stop visitors speeding in Chile’s Atacama desert.

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A mother mountain goat (Oreamnos americanus) and her baby on a rocky ledge in Glacier National Park, Montana.

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A mother mountain goat (Oreamnos americanus) and her baby walk down a rocky path in Glacier National Park, Montana.

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An interior least tern (Sterna antillarum), a federally endangered species, on its nest at the Western Sand and Gravel mine along the Platte River near Fremont, NE. Many mine companies are pausing work during the nesting season in areas this bird and other rare species use.

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A mother mountain goat (Oreamnos americanus) and her baby rest on a rocky ledge in Glacier National Park, Montana.

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A female bobolink (Dolichonyx oryzivorus) is caught by biologists using a mist net, near Wood River, Nebraska. Avian ecologists trap and put tiny geolocators, which track sun intensity as well as sunrise and sunset, on male bobolinks. When the birds are recaptured (months from now) and the data is downloaded and used to calculate the birds’ migratory route. The species winters in South America, but little is known of its specific route.

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Biologists tag a male bobolink (Dolichonyx oryzivorus) in Nebraska. They will put tiny geolocators, which track sun intensity as well as sunrise and sunset, the birds’ backs. When the birds are recaptured (months from now) and the data is downloaded and used to calculate the birds’ migratory route. The species winters in South America, but little is known of its specific route.

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A grasshopper sparrow (Ammodramus savannarum) nest is well camouflaged in the thick prairie grasses along the Platte River near Wood River, Nebraska.

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A male bobolink (Dolichonyx oryzivorus) near Wood River, Nebraska.

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A biologist holds a male bobolink (Dolichonyx oryzivorus), captured for a study near Wood River, Nebraska. They will put tiny geolocators, which track sun intensity as well as sunrise and sunset, the birds’ backs. When the birds are recaptured (months from now) and the data is downloaded and used to calculate the birds’ migratory route. The species winters in South America, but little is known of its specific route.

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Biologists capture a male bobolink (Dolichonyx oryzivorus) near Wood River, Nebraska. They will put tiny geolocators, which track sun intensity as well as sunrise and sunset, the birds’ backs. When the birds are recaptured (months from now) and the data is downloaded and used to calculate the birds’ migratory route. The species winters in South America, but little is known of its specific route.

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Biologists capture a male bobolink (Dolichonyx oryzivorus) near Wood River, Nebraska. They will put tiny geolocators, which track sun intensity as well as sunrise and sunset, the birds’ backs. When the birds are recaptured (months from now) and the data is downloaded and used to calculate the birds’ migratory route. The species winters in South America, but little is known of its specific route.

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A woman stands beneath a home watching crews build new berms, with BP money, in order to protect the beaches from storm water and the oil from the deep water horizon spill that could come with it on Dauphin Island, Alabama.

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Workers sift through sand to separate the oil on the beaches of Dauphin Island, Alabama.

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Workers from Southern Native Plants out of Milton, Florida planting sea oats (Uniola paniculata) on a newly created sand dune to protect Dauphin Island, Alabama from the deep water horizon oil spill.

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A crew working to clean a pelican at the rehab center in Fort Jackson, Louisiana. This is where the majority of the oiled birds were brought in from the deep water horizon oil spill.

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A crew working to clean an oiled bird at the rehab center in Fort Jackson, Louisiana. This is where the majority of the oiled birds were brought in from the deep water horizon oil spill.

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A crew working to clean an oiled bird at the rehab center in Fort Jackson, Louisiana. This is where the majority of the oiled birds were brought in from the deep water horizon oil spill.

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Sand berms frame rows of beach houses on Dauphin Island, Alabama during the deep water horizon oil spill.

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Sand berms frame rows of beach houses on Dauphin Island, Alabama during the deep water horizon oil spill.

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Workers washing an oiled brown pelican (Pelecanus occidentalis) at the rehab center in Fort Jackson, Louisiana. This is where the majority of the oiled birds were brought in from the deep water horizon oil spill.

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Workers from Southern Native Plants out of Milton, Florida are planting sea oats (Uniola paniculata) in sand dunes on Dauphin Island, Alabama.

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A crew working to clean a brown pelican (Pelecanus occidentalis) at the rehab center in Fort Jackson, Louisiana. This is where the majority of the oiled birds were brought in from the deep water horizon oil spill.

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A crew working to clean a brown pelican (Pelecanus occidentalis) at the rehab center in Fort Jackson, Louisiana. This is where the majority of the oiled birds were brought in from the deep water horizon oil spill.

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A crew working to clean a brown pelican (Pelecanus occidentalis) at the rehab center in Fort Jackson, Louisiana. This is where the majority of the oiled birds were brought in from the deep water horizon oil spill.

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An aerial of heavily oiled marshlands surrounded by oil booms in Barataria Bay, Louisiana.

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A crew working to clean a brown pelican (Pelecanus occidentalis) at the rehab center in Fort Jackson, Louisiana. This is where the majority of the oiled birds were brought in from the deep water horizon oil spill.

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A nesting dunlin (Calidris alpina) with an hours-old chick on the tundra near Barrow, Alaska.

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A nesting dunlin (Calidris alpina) with an hours-old chick on the tundra near Barrow, Alaska.

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A clean up crew hired by BP tries to sop oil from the Deepwater Horizon spill, along the shoreline on Queen Bess island in Barataria Bay, Louisiana.

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Berms were built on a barrier island near Grand Isle, Louisiana, in an attempt to protect it from the Deepwater Horizon oil spill.

Photo: Julie Jensen Director of Marketing | WVC O: 866.800.7326 | D: 702.443.9249 | E: j.jensen@wvc.org

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