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Caribou (Rangifer tarandus) walking at sunset near Prudhoe Bay, Alaska.

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A caribou (Rangifer tarandus) from the Central Arctic herd crosses an industrial road on Alaska’s North Slope, near Prudhoe Bay.

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A red fox (Vulpes vulpes) and kit at the edge of an oil field on Alaska’s North Slope near Prudhoe Bay.

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A red fox (Vulpes vulpes) and kit at the edge of an oil field on Alaska’s North Slope near Prudhoe Bay.

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A braided stream crosses the tundra on the North Slope of Alaska near Prudhoe Bay.

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A blanket of sea ice over the Beaufort Sea, near Prudhoe Bay.

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An arctic ground squirrel (Spermophilus parryii) investigates some logs for food in Prudhoe Bay, Alaska.

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Construction workers work on an oil pipeline in Prudhoe Bay, Alaska.

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Construction workers work on an oil pipeline in Prudhoe Bay, Alaska.

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Central Arctic caribou in an oil field in Prudhoe Bay on Alaska’s North Slope.

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Caribou warily cross a road in the Kuparek oil field, part of greater Prudhoe Bay. Those in favor point out that remnants of wildlife can still be seen in heavily developed oil fields. Environmentalists point out that the area is now an extremely polluted industrial zone.

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As the oil industry expands its activities exponentially every year, supply trucks roll day and night up the haul road connecting Prudhoe Bay with the rest of the world.

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As the oil industry expands its activities exponentially every year, supply trucks roll day and night up the haul road connecting Prudhoe Bay with the rest of the world.

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Live birds serve as bait in a raven study area in Prudhoe Bay. The oil industry sponsors projects to trap and radio tag the birds in order to learn more about them. Ravens are quite disruptive to the oil industry, often dropping wire and nesting material into power transformers.

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Oil workers perform a ‘workover’ on a thirty-year-old well head in Prudhoe Bay. Old wells need constant coaxing to continue to bring up oil. Some 95% of the fluid coming up now is water.

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An aerial of Prudhoe Bay. In operation since the 1970’s, the aging field is nearing the end of its life with no funding or plans in place to clean up the mess when the oil plays out. This area is thought to be one of the largest industrial zones on Earth.

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A king eider swims in a pond in Prudhoe Bay, Alaska. Shownin the reflection is a piece of earth-moving equipment.

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A tundra swan (Cygnus columbianus) in Prudhoe Bay, Alaska.

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Shorebirds killed by a collision with power lines at Prudhoe Bay oil field on Alaska’s North Slope.

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Ptarmigan with winter coloring at Prudhoe Bay, Alaska.

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Ptarmigan with winter coloring at Prudhoe Bay, Alaska.

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Ptarmigan with winter coloring at Prudhoe Bay, Alaska.

Photo: Julie Jensen Director of Marketing | WVC O: 866.800.7326 | D: 702.443.9249 | E: j.jensen@wvc.org

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