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ESA002-00242

A federally endangered Key Largo wood rat (Neotoma floridana smalli) at Disney’s Animal Kingdom. Fewer than 250 adults are believed left in the wild, in just two parcels of public land on Key Largo. Captive breeding efforts are underway at both Disney’s Animal Kingdom and the Lowry Park Zoo in Tampa, thought the captive population still numbers less than 50 animals.

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ESA002-00243

A federally endangered Key Largo wood rat (Neotoma floridana smalli) at Disney’s Animal Kingdom. Fewer than 250 adults are believed left in the wild, in just two parcels of public land on Key Largo. Captive breeding efforts are underway at both Disney’s Animal Kingdom and the Lowry Park Zoo in Tampa, thought the captive population still numbers less than 50 animals.

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ESA002-00244

A federally endangered Key Largo wood rat (Neotoma floridana smalli) at Disney’s Animal Kingdom. Fewer than 250 adults are believed left in the wild, in just two parcels of public land on Key Largo. Captive breeding efforts are underway at both Disney’s Animal Kingdom and the Lowry Park Zoo in Tampa, thought the captive population still numbers less than 50 animals.

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ESA002-00245

A federally endangered Key Largo wood rat (Neotoma floridana smalli) at Disney’s Animal Kingdom. Fewer than 250 adults are believed left in the wild, in just two parcels of public land on Key Largo. Captive breeding efforts are underway at both Disney’s Animal Kingdom and the Lowry Park Zoo in Tampa, thought the captive population still numbers less than 50 animals.

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ESA002-00170

A federally-endangered Key Largo wood rat (Neotoma floridana smalli). There are approximately 250 or fewer of these animals left.

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ESA002-00171

A federally-endangered Key Largo wood rat (Neotoma floridana smalli). There are approximately 250 or fewer of these animals left.

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ANI012-00230

A Key Largo woodrat (Neotoma floridana) (US: Endangered) at Disney’s Animal Kingdom. Fewer than 250 adults are believed left in the wild, in just two parcels of public land on Key Largo. Captive breeding efforts are underway at both Disney’s Animal Kingdom and the Lowry Park Zoo in Tampa, thought the captive population still numbers less than 50 animals.

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ANI012-00231

A Key Largo woodrat (Neotoma floridana) (US: Endangered) at Disney’s Animal Kingdom. Fewer than 250 adults are believed left in the wild, in just two parcels of public land on Key Largo. Captive breeding efforts are underway at both Disney’s Animal Kingdom and the Lowry Park Zoo in Tampa, thought the captive population still numbers less than 50 animals.

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ANI012-00228

A Key Largo woodrat (Neotoma floridana) (US: Endangered) at Disney’s Animal Kingdom. Fewer than 250 adults are believed left in the wild, in just two parcels of public land on Key Largo. Captive breeding efforts are underway at both Disney’s Animal Kingdom and the Lowry Park Zoo in Tampa, thought the captive population still numbers less than 50 animals.

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ANI012-00229

A Key Largo woodrat (Neotoma floridana) (US: Endangered) at Disney’s Animal Kingdom. Fewer than 250 adults are believed left in the wild, in just two parcels of public land on Key Largo. Captive breeding efforts are underway at both Disney’s Animal Kingdom and the Lowry Park Zoo in Tampa, thought the captive population still numbers less than 50 animals.

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ANI012-00215

A fancy rat (Rattus norvegicus) at the Captial Humane Society.

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ANI012-00216

A fancy rat (Rattus norvegicus) at the Captial Humane Society.

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ESA001-00152

A Key Largo woodrat (Neotoma floridana) (US: Endangered) at Disney’s Animal Kingdom. Fewer than 250 adults are believed left in the wild, in just two parcels of public land on Key Largo. Captive breeding efforts are underway at both Disney’s Animal Kingdom and the Lowry Park Zoo in Tampa, thought the captive population still numbers less than 50 animals.

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ENV019-00010

Men butcher and cook bushmeat, including a marsh cane rat (Thryonomys swinderianus), two tree pangolin (Phataginus tricuspis) and two brush-tailed porcupine (Atherurus africanus) and a blue duiker (Philantomba monticola), in a market in Malabo, Equatorial Guinea.

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ENV019-00011

Men butcher and cook bushmeat, including a marsh cane rat (Thryonomys swinderianus), two tree pangolin (Phataginus tricuspis) and two brush-tailed porcupine (Atherurus africanus) and a blue duiker (Philantomba monticola melanorheus), in a market in Malabo, Equatorial Guinea.

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ENV019-00014

A man displays his butchered and cooked bush meat, including a marsh cane rat (Thryonomys swinderianus), tree pangolin (Phataginus tricuspis) and brush-tailed porcupine (Atherurus africanus), in a market in Malabo, Equatorial Guinea.

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ENV019-00001

Men butcher and cook bushmeat, including a marsh cane rat (Thryonomys swinderianus), two tree pangolin (Phataginus tricuspis) and two brush-tailed porcupine (Atherurus africanus), in a market in Malabo, Equatorial Guinea.

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ENV019-00002

Men butcher and cook bushmeat, including a marsh cane rat (Thryonomys swinderianus), two tree pangolin (Phataginus tricuspis) and two brush-tailed porcupine (Atherurus africanus), in a market in Malabo, Equatorial Guinea.

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ENV019-00003

Butchered and cooked bushmeat, including a marsh cane rat (Thryonomys swinderianus), two tree pangolin (Phataginus tricuspis) and two brush-tailed porcupine (Atherurus africanus), in a market in Malabo, Equatorial Guinea.

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ANI012-00099

A domestic rat at the George M. Sutton Avian Research Center.

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ANI012-00098

A domestic rat at the George M. Sutton Avian Research Center.

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ANI012-00097

A domestic rat at the George M. Sutton Avian Research Center.

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ANI012-00096

A domestic rat at the George M. Sutton Avian Research Center.

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ANI012-00095

A domestic rat at the George M. Sutton Avian Research Center.

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ANI012-00094

Domestic rats (Rattus norvegicus) at the Sutton Avian Research Center.

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ANI012-00093

A domestic rat at the George M. Sutton Avian Research Center.

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ANI012-00092

Domestic rats (Rattus norvegicus) at the Sutton Avian Research Center.

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ANI012-00051

A ‘hairless dumbo’ domestic rat (Rattus norvegicus) at the Safari Land Pet Store.

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ANI027-00128

A white-sided rat snake (Elaphe obsoleta obsoleta) at Safari Land Pet Center.

Photo: Julie Jensen Director of Marketing | WVC O: 866.800.7326 | D: 702.443.9249 | E: j.jensen@wvc.org

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