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ANI110-00238

A water frog (Telmatobius sp.) at Balsa de los Sapos. This species is a part of a breeding study center at the Universidad Católica del Ecuador in Quito.

This individual was likely from Bolivia.

DNA work is being done now to determine species and origin.

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ANI110-00237

A water frog (Telmatobius sp.) at Balsa de los Sapos. This species is a part of a breeding study center at the Universidad Católica del Ecuador in Quito.

This individual was likely from Bolivia.

DNA work is being done now to determine species and origin.

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ANI110-00236

A water frog (Telmatobius sp.) at Balsa de los Sapos. This species is a part of a breeding study center at the Universidad Católica del Ecuador in Quito.

This individual was likely from Bolivia.

DNA work is being done now to determine species and origin.

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ANI110-00235

A water frog (Telmatobius sp.) at Balsa de los Sapos. This species is a part of a breeding study center at the Universidad Católica del Ecuador in Quito.

This individual was likely from Bolivia.

DNA work is being done now to determine species and origin.

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ANI110-00234

A water frog (Telmatobius sp.) at Balsa de los Sapos. This species is a part of a breeding study center at the Universidad Católica del Ecuador in Quito.

This individual was likely from Bolivia.

DNA work is being done now to determine species and origin.

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ANI110-00239

A water frog (Telmatobius sp.) at Balsa de los Sapos. This species is a part of a breeding study center at the Universidad Católica del Ecuador in Quito.

This individual was likely from Bolivia.

DNA work is being done now to determine species and origin.

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SCE054-00146

Dr. Ludwig Siefert and senior research assistant James Kalyewa use a wide range of monitoring techniques to track the movement of large predators in Uganda.

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ANI040-00418

A Rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta) at the Rolling Hills Zoo.

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ANI040-00417

Rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) at the Rolling Hills Zoo. The big male with complete fur is Adam. The female is Julie.

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ANI040-00416

Rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) at the Rolling Hills Zoo. The big male with complete fur is Adam. The female is Julie.

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SCE054-00124

Experts check for the signals of radio collared lions.

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SCE054-00125

A crew tranquilizes and radio collars a lion for monitoring.

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SCE054-00126

A crew tranquilizes and radio collars a lion for monitoring.

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PEO020-00136

A brown rat (Rattus norvegicus) trapped by a research team studying rodents for a movement tracking study in Queensland, Australia.

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ONA007-00075

A biologist radio collars a lioness in the Ishasha Section of Queen Elizabeth National Park.

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ESA002-00040

An endangered (IUCN) and federally endangered mountain yellow-legged frog (Rana muscosa). Population locality: San Bernardino.

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ESA002-00041

Endangered (IUCN) and federally endangered mountain yellow-legged frogs (Rana muscosa). Population locality: San Bernardino.

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ESA002-00042

An endangered (IUCN) and federally endangered mountain yellow-legged frog (Rana muscosa). Population locality: San Bernardino.

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ESA002-00043

Captive breeding tanks for endangered (IUCN) and federally endangered mountain yellow-legged frogs (Rana muscosa).

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ESA002-00039

Endangered (IUCN) and federally endangered mountain yellow-legged frogs (Rana muscosa). Population locality: San Bernardino.

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ESA002-00035

An endangered (IUCN) and federally endangered mountain yellow-legged frog (Rana muscosa). Population locality: San Jacinto.

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ESA002-00036

An endangered (IUCN) and federally endangered mountain yellow-legged frog (Rana muscosa). Population locality: San Bernardino.

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ESA002-00037

An endangered (IUCN) and federally endangered mountain yellow-legged frog (Rana muscosa). Population locality: San Bernardino.

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ESA002-00038

Endangered (IUCN) and federally endangered mountain yellow-legged frogs (Rana muscosa). Population locality: San Bernardino.

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ESA002-00033

An endangered (IUCN) and federally endangered mountain yellow-legged frog (Rana muscosa). Population locality: San Jacinto.

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ESA002-00034

An endangered (IUCN) and federally endangered mountain yellow-legged frog (Rana muscosa). Population locality: San Bernardino.

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ANI062-00137

A researcher from the Texas Marine Mammal Stranding Network photographs dead bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) washed up from the Gulf of Mexico in a research effort to determine what killed the animals.

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SCE048-00073

A scientist examines and feeds captive frogs at the captive breeding facility known as Balsa de los Sapos, or Amphibian Ark, at Quito’s Catholic University, Ecuador.

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SCE048-00074

Amphibian specimens at the captive breeding facility known as Balsa de los Sapos, or Amphibian Ark, at Quito’s Catholic University, Ecuador.

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SCE048-00070

Scientists examine and feed frogs at the captive breeding facility known as Balsa de los Sapos, or Amphibian Ark, at Quito’s Catholic University, Ecuador.

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SCE048-00071

A captive, endangered marsupial frog (Gastrotheca litonedis) at the captive breeding facility known as Balsa de los Sapos, or Amphibian Ark, at Quito’s Catholic University, Ecuador.

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SCE048-00072

A scientist holds an endangered San Lucas marsupial frog (Gastrotheca pseustes) at the captive breeding facility known as Balsa de los Sapos, or Amphibian Ark, at Quito’s Catholic University, Ecuador.

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ANI078-00174

Atelopes ignescens, one of many extinct Atelopus species in the collection at Pontificia Universidad Catolica del Ecuador in Quito.

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SCE048-00054

A biologist at the amphibian lab of Pontificia Universidad Catolica del Ecuador in Quito.

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SCE048-00056

Three scientists examine the previous evening’s collection of amphibians in their hotel room in Limon, Ecuador.

Photo: Julie Jensen Director of Marketing | WVC O: 866.800.7326 | D: 702.443.9249 | E: j.jensen@wvc.org

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