Photo

ANI082-00195

Bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) swimming in the Bighorn Creek, in the Wigwam River drainage in British Columbia. This is one of the last, best places for spawning of the vulnerable (ICUN) and federally-threatened bull trout, and is part of the Kootenay River system, which sees an annual migration of bull trout from Lake Koocanusa, some fifty miles away. The fish prefer very cold water of 40 degrees or so in order to spawn, and the springs in this area provide that. Ram Creek flows into the Wigwam, and between the two of them they support some 5,000 bull trout.

Photo

ANI039-00214

A five-lined skink (Eumeces fasciatus) collected from the Conasauga River.

Photo

ANI039-00213

A five-lined skink (Eumeces fasciatus) collected from the Conasauga River.

Photo

ANI039-00212

A five-lined skink (Eumeces fasciatus) collected from the Conasauga River.

Photo

INS014-00097

A studio portrait of a platte river caddisfly, (Ironoquia plattensis), a candidate for the endangered species list.

Photo

INS014-00100

A Platte River caddisfly (Ironoquia plattensis) a candidate for listing under the U.S. Endangered Species Act.

Photo

INS014-00099

A Platte River caddisfly (Ironoquia plattensis) a candidate for listing under the U.S. Endangered Species Act.

Photo

ONA007-00144

Mussel biologist Steve Ahlstedt shows off coal fines, the sediments from Virginia’s coal mines that wash into the rivers of Tennessee. It is thought that coal fines and the use of heavy industrial chemicals to clean coal in Viriginia are both major factors in the disappearance of rare Mussels in the Clinch and Powell Rivers, two of the last places where many rare mussels were found.

Photo

SCE055-00029

Crocodiles inside of Gorongosa National Park in Mozambique, Africa.

Photo

SCE055-00011

Aerials of the Vunduzi River watershed inside the main Gorongosa National Park in Mozambique, Africa. Inselbergs rise up from the west edge of the original Gorongosa National Park. Now in the dry season, little water can be seen flowing through this area.

Photo

SCE055-00020

Crocodiles dive into the Vunduzi River inside the main park in Gorongosa National Park in Mozambique, Africa.

Photo

SCE005-00003

A boat travels up a river in Madidi National Park, Bolivia.

Photo

SCE055-00001

Clear-cuts and remnants of rain forest flank the Vanduzi waterfall, on the east side of Mount Gorongosa. The mountain was added to the national park in 2010, but thousands of people still live on it. Many cut firewood to burn for heat and cooking, and many practice slash-and-burn agriculture.

Photo

BEA018-00015

A black bear feeds on sockeye salmon on the Kennedy River, Vancouver Island, British Columbia, Canada.

Photo

BIR003-00424

Thousands of sandhill cranes roost on the Platte River during their annual migratory stopover at the Rowe Audubon Sanctuary near Gibbon, NE. With water in the river fully appropriated for urban areas and agriculture, many wonder how long it will be until the river runs dry. Some 600,000 to 800,000 cranes use just a few miles of the river in central Nebraska–areas that have been been mechanically cleared of the woody vegetation that the birds can’t tolerate.

Photo

INS014-00101

A Platte River caddisfly (Ironoquia plattensis) a candidate for listing under the U.S. Endangered Species Act.

Photo

INS014-00102

A Platte River caddisfly (Ironoquia plattensis) a candidate for listing under the U.S. Endangered Species Act.

Photo

INS014-00103

A Platte River caddisfly (Ironoquia plattensis) a candidate for listing under the U.S. Endangered Species Act.

Photo

INS014-00098

A Platte River caddisfly (Ironoquia plattensis) a candidate for listing under the U.S. Endangered Species Act.

Photo

PEO001-00159

A Mexican family wade across the Rio Grande beneath the International bridge, leaving Matamoros and entering Brownsville, Texas illegally.

Photo

SCE029-00014

An aerial of bayou DeView, where there have been ivory billed woodpecker sightings in Arkansas.

Photo

BIR044-00031

Biologists from Cornell eat their lunch standing while searching for the ivory billed woodpecker in the White River National Wildlife Refuge in St. Charles, Arkansas.

Photo

ESA001-00164

These are steelhead salmon smolts (Oncorhynchus mykiss) being raised at a hatchery. They will soon be transported to release streams in the hope that some of them will survive their migration to the sea; but the heavily dammed Columbia river and its tributaries have become an obstacle course for several imperiled species. In addition the Native Americans, to whom the salmon runs are crucial, find fishing very poor. (US: Threatened)

Photo

ESA001-00160

This tiny snail darter (Percina tanasi) stalled the construction of Tellico dam on the Little Tennessee river. Though the dam was built, the Endangered Species Act was henceforth seen in many quarters as an enemy of progress.

Photo: Julie Jensen Director of Marketing | WVC O: 866.800.7326 | D: 702.443.9249 | E: j.jensen@wvc.org

Speaking Engagements

Joel is a popular keynote speaker with conservation, corporate, and civic groups.

Hire him to entertain and inspire your audience.

Book Joel To Speak

The Photo Ark

Joel is the founder of the Photo Ark, a groundbreaking effort to document every species in captivity before it’s too late.

Explore the Photo Ark

Visit Our Store

Every purchase goes directly to support our mission: getting the public to care and helping to save species from extinction.

Help Us Build the Ark