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A sun-enhanced shower falls on Lemhi county residents who came to the town of Salmon for the annual Salmon River Days festival.

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Edward Hatch Memorial Shell concert of the Boston Pops orchestra on the Charles river in Boston, Massachusets.

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Snapped willow trunks are perches for egrets and ibis that survived hurricane Andrew in the Atchafalaya river basin in Louisiana.

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A father and son view a fish kill, some of the 182 million fish which suffocated when organic matter depleted the oxygen supply in the Atchafalaya river basin after hurricane Andrew.

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Illegal immigrants don dry clothes after swimming across the Rio Grande river near a bridge in Brownsville, Texas.

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Aerials of the Jonah Field in the Green River Basin, Wyoming. A once-wild area that’s now an industrial zone due to natural gas drilling. Sage grouse, mule deer and pronghorn antelope habitat has mostly been ruined here, with no end in sight as the drilling increases across the Pinedale Anticline, the large mesa that caps the gas deposits.

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Aerials of the Jonah Field in the Green River Basin, Wyoming. A once-wild area that’s now an industrial zone due to natural gas drilling. Sage grouse, mule deer and pronghorn antelope habitat has mostly been ruined here, with no end in sight as the drilling increases across the Pinedale Anticline, the large mesa that caps the gas deposits.

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Hungry Horse Dam, one of the biggest dams that blocks bull trout movements in Northern Montana. Note that biologists say this dam actually prevents non-native fish from moving upstream here, which today is a good thing. No fish ladder or passages were incorporated into this or any other dam in this region at the time they were built.

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A bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) in Bighorn Creek which is part of the Kootenay river system in British Columbia, Canada. (IUCN: Vulnerable; US: Federally threatened)

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A fisherman in the Bighorn (Ram) Creek, part of the Kootenay River system in British Columbia, Canada.

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A bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) in Bighorn Creek which is part of the Kootenay river system in British Columbia, Canada. (IUCN: Vulnerable; US: Federally threatened)

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Bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) swimming in the Bighorn Creek, in the Wigwam River drainage in British Columbia. This is one of the last, best places for spawning of the vulnerable (ICUN) and federally-threatened bull trout, and is part of the Kootenay River system, which sees an annual migration of bull trout from Lake Koocanusa, some fifty miles away. The fish prefer very cold water of 40 degrees or so in order to spawn, and the springs in this area provide that.

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Biologists collect samples from a vulnerable (IUCN) and federally threatened bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) Clark Fork River, Idaho.

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The Thompson Falls dam, which is currently starting construction to build a fish passage system on the Clark Fork river in Thompson Falls, Montana. Shown is the road way being constructed on the downstream side that will be used to transport heavy machinery.

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A fisheries technician for dam owner Avista, uses a radio antenna to track tagged bull trout in a stream that feeds into Noxon Reservoir. Biologists track a handful of tagged fish daily to try and learn about their migratory movements, which a series of dams on the nearby Clark Fork River have severely impeded.

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An aerial of the Bowden natural gas drilling area along the MIlk river northeast of Malta, Montana.

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A train crosses over a bridge in the Walton area of Glacier National Park, Montana.

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A mother mountain goat (Oreamnos americanus) and her baby walk down a rocky path in Glacier National Park, Montana.

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A bobcat (Lynx rufus) photographed by a camera trap along the Tex-Mex border wall. The border wall cuts through many places of the last habitat left along the lower Rio Grande river, the wall is a huge impediment to the movement of wildlife species that can’t fly over it.

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A female bobolink (Dolichonyx oryzivorus) is caught by biologists using a mist net, near Wood River, Nebraska. Avian ecologists trap and put tiny geolocators, which track sun intensity as well as sunrise and sunset, on male bobolinks. When the birds are recaptured (months from now) and the data is downloaded and used to calculate the birds’ migratory route. The species winters in South America, but little is known of its specific route.

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Biologists tag a male bobolink (Dolichonyx oryzivorus) in Nebraska. They will put tiny geolocators, which track sun intensity as well as sunrise and sunset, the birds’ backs. When the birds are recaptured (months from now) and the data is downloaded and used to calculate the birds’ migratory route. The species winters in South America, but little is known of its specific route.

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A grasshopper sparrow (Ammodramus savannarum) nest is well camouflaged in the thick prairie grasses along the Platte River near Wood River, Nebraska.

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A male bobolink (Dolichonyx oryzivorus) near Wood River, Nebraska.

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A biologist holds a male bobolink (Dolichonyx oryzivorus), captured for a study near Wood River, Nebraska. They will put tiny geolocators, which track sun intensity as well as sunrise and sunset, the birds’ backs. When the birds are recaptured (months from now) and the data is downloaded and used to calculate the birds’ migratory route. The species winters in South America, but little is known of its specific route.

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A USFWS wildlife biologist, runs a radio telemtery set for bobcat signals along the wall on the Lower Rio Grande NWR near Santa Maria. The wall bisects many of the tiny habitat tracts that remain along the border.

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A bobcat (Lynx rufus) photographed by a camera trap along the Texas-Mexico border in Texas. Cutting in many places through the last of the habitat left along the lower Rio Grande river, the wall is a huge impediment to the movement of wildlife species that can’t fly over it. Photograph by Joel Sartore with Mitch Sternberg, Jennifer Lowry, and Naghma Malik, all U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

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Mexican free-tailed bats (Tadarida brasiliensis) swirl out of the Eckert James River Bat Cave at sunset to feed on insects. This maternity colony builds to more than 6 million bats in late July, making it one of the largest in the world. It is owned and managed by The Nature Conservancy.

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Mexican free-tailed bats (Tadarida brasiliensis) swirl out of the Eckert James River Bat Cave at sunset to feed on insects. This maternity colony builds to more than 6 million bats in late July, making it one of the largest in the world. It is owned and managed by The Nature Conservancy.

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Biologists capture a male bobolink (Dolichonyx oryzivorus) near Wood River, Nebraska. They will put tiny geolocators, which track sun intensity as well as sunrise and sunset, the birds’ backs. When the birds are recaptured (months from now) and the data is downloaded and used to calculate the birds’ migratory route. The species winters in South America, but little is known of its specific route.

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Biologists capture a male bobolink (Dolichonyx oryzivorus) near Wood River, Nebraska. They will put tiny geolocators, which track sun intensity as well as sunrise and sunset, the birds’ backs. When the birds are recaptured (months from now) and the data is downloaded and used to calculate the birds’ migratory route. The species winters in South America, but little is known of its specific route.

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Thousands of sandhill cranes (Grus canadensis) roost on the Platte River during their annual migratory stopover at the Rowe Audubon Sanctuary near Gibbon, NE. With water in the river fully appropriated for urban areas and agriculture, many wonder how long it will be until the river runs dry. Some 600,000 to 800,000 cranes use just a few miles of the river in central Nebraska–areas that have been been mechanically cleared of the woody vegetation that the birds can’t tolerate.

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Sandhill cranes (Grus canadensis) kettling over the Platte River, near the Rowe Audubon Sanctuary in Gibbon, Nebraska.

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Sandhill cranes (Grus canadensis) in flight over the Platte River near the Rowe Audubon Sanctuary in Gibbon, Nebraska.

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Thousands of sandhill cranes (Grus canadensis) roost on the Platte River during their annual migratory stopover at the Rowe Audubon Sanctuary near Gibbon, NE. With water in the river fully appropriated for urban areas and agriculture, many wonder how long it will be until the river runs dry. Some 600,000 to 800,000 cranes use just a few miles of the river in central Nebraska–areas that have been been mechanically cleared of the woody vegetation that the birds can’t tolerate.

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Thousands of sandhill cranes (Grus canadensis) roost on the Platte River during their annual migratory stopover at the Rowe Audubon Sanctuary near Gibbon, NE. With water in the river fully appropriated for urban areas and agriculture, many wonder how long it will be until the river runs dry. Some 600,000 to 800,000 cranes use just a few miles of the river in central Nebraska–areas that have been been mechanically cleared of the woody vegetation that the birds can’t tolerate.

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Thousands of sandhill cranes (Grus canadensis) roost on the Platte River during their annual migratory stopover at the Rowe Audubon Sanctuary near Gibbon, NE. With water in the river fully appropriated for urban areas and agriculture, many wonder how long it will be until the river runs dry. Some 600,000 to 800,000 cranes use just a few miles of the river in central Nebraska–areas that have been been mechanically cleared of the woody vegetation that the birds can’t tolerate.

Photo: Julie Jensen Director of Marketing | WVC O: 866.800.7326 | D: 702.443.9249 | E: j.jensen@wvc.org

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