Photo

FIS001-00028

Salmon heads washed up on the banks of the Columbia river at a Native American fish-cleaning site near Celilo, OR.

Photo

FIS001-00029

Salmon heads washed up on the banks of the Columbia river at a Native American fish-cleaning site near Celilo, OR.

Photo

FIS001-00024

A salmon with bear claw marks jumps up at Brooks Falls in Alaska.

Photo

FIS001-00019

A lucky young fisherman on the Wind River (trib. of the Columbia R.) holds up a Spring Chinook Salmon.

Photo

FIS001-00020

A salmon counter at the Bonneville Dam tracks the species as it moves through the Columbia River system.

Photo

FIS001-00017

Workers at an Idaho fish harvest eggs from a Snake River Sockeye salmon.

Photo

FIS001-00018

A worker at an Idaho fish hatchery examines eggs from the Snake River Sockeye.

Photo

FIS001-00015

Workers at an Idaho fish hatchery examine Snake River Sockeye salmon.

Photo

FIS001-00016

Workers at an Idaho fish hatchery examine Snake River Sockeye salmon.

Photo

FIS001-00013

A “fish ladder,” designed to move salmon smolts past dams on the Columbia River and out to sea.

Photo

FIS001-00014

This Snake River Sockeye Salmon was the only fish of its species to return to spawn in Idaho that year. Hatchery workers take sperm in case females return in years to come.

Photo

FIS001-00010

To move salmon from hatcheries past dams on the Columbia River, the US Army Corps of Engineers has developed an elaborate system of piping and barging the fish out to sea.

Photo

FIS001-00011

To move salmon from hatcheries past dams on the Columbia River, the US Army Corps of Engineers has developed an elaborate system of piping and barging the fish out to sea.

Photo

FIS001-00008

The US Army Corps of Engineers developed an elaborate system of barging to move salmon smolts past the hydroelectric dams of the Columbia River and out to sea.

Photo

FIS001-00009

To move salmon from hatcheries past dams on the Columbia River, the US Army Corps of Engineers has developed an elaborate system of piping and barging the fish out to sea.

Photo

FIS001-00007

Salmon smolts from a hatchery are released into a tributary of the Columbia R.

Photo

FIS001-00005

Salmon smolts are piped from the hatchery, barged past dams and released at the sea.

Photo

FIS001-00006

Salmon smolts are piped from the hatchery, barged past dams and released at the sea.

Photo

FIS001-00003

Salmon smolts raised at the Hagerman Nat’l Fish Hatchery in ID for release into the Columbia R.

Photo

FIS001-00004

Salmon smolts raised at the Hagerman Nat’l Fish Hatchery in ID for release into the Columbia R.

Photo

FIS001-00001

A salmon counter at the Bonneville Dam tracks the species as it moves through the Columbia River system.

Photo

FIS001-00002

The salmon counter at the Bonneville Dam tracks several species of salmon as they move through the Columbia River system.

Photo

DAM005-00001

The McNary Dam sits between the Umatilla and Columba Rivers. Dams like this are part of the cause for the decline of salmon in the Pacific northwest. Young salmon don’t make it out to sea to mature, and dams block the migration of older salmon back upstream to spawn.

Photo

DAM004-00002

Spillway of the Lower Granite Dam (hydroelectric) on the Columbia River.

Photo

DAM004-00001

Spillway of the Lower Granite Dam (hydroelectric) on the Columbia River.

Photo

DAM003-00004

A hydroelectric dam on the Snake R. (a tributary of the Columbia) in Hell’s Canyon.

Photo

DAM003-00005

A hydroelectric dam on the Snake R. (a tributary of the Columbia) in Hell’s Canyon.

Photo

DAM003-00003

A hydroelectric dam on the Snake R. (a tributary of the Columbia) in Hell’s Canyon.

Photo

DAM003-00001

A hydroelectric dam on the Snake R. (a tributary of the Columbia) in Hell’s Canyon.

Photo

DAM003-00002

A hydroelectric dam on the Snake R. (a tributary of the Columbia) in Hell’s Canyon.

Photo

DAM002-00005

Hydroelectric dams like the Bonneville on the Columbia R. cause problems for salmon.

Photo

DAM002-00003

Hydroelectric dams like the Bonneville on the Columbia R. cause problems for salmon.

Photo: Julie Jensen Director of Marketing | WVC O: 866.800.7326 | D: 702.443.9249 | E: j.jensen@wvc.org

Speaking Engagements

Joel is a popular keynote speaker with conservation, corporate, and civic groups.

Hire him to entertain and inspire your audience.

Book Joel To Speak

The Photo Ark

Joel is the founder of the Photo Ark, a groundbreaking effort to document every species in captivity before it’s too late.

Explore the Photo Ark

Visit Our Store

Every purchase goes directly to support our mission: getting the public to care and helping to save species from extinction.

Help Us Build the Ark