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FIS005-00133

A wild caught orangethroat darter (Etheostoma spectabile) in Missouri.

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ANI082-00195

Bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) swimming in the Bighorn Creek, in the Wigwam River drainage in British Columbia. This is one of the last, best places for spawning of the vulnerable (ICUN) and federally-threatened bull trout, and is part of the Kootenay River system, which sees an annual migration of bull trout from Lake Koocanusa, some fifty miles away. The fish prefer very cold water of 40 degrees or so in order to spawn, and the springs in this area provide that. Ram Creek flows into the Wigwam, and between the two of them they support some 5,000 bull trout.

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ANI102-00397

An egg-eating snake (Dasypeltis scabra scabra) at Zoo Atlanta.

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ANI102-00394

An egg-eating snake (Dasypeltis scabra scabra) at Zoo Atlanta.

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BIR057-00330

Bridled white-eye (Zosterops saypani) at the Sedgwick County Zoo. This species is listed on IUCN as Endangered.

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ANI077-00550

Mexican kingsnake (Lampropeltis ruthveni) at the Budapest Zoo.

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ANI062-00356

A vulnerable adult female white bellied pangolin (Phataginus tricuspis) with her baby, part of Pangolin Conservation, a non-profit organization in Saint Augustine, Florida. This juvenile is only 70 days old. She is the first of her species to be bred in captivity.

Frustratingly, traditional Chinese medicine falsely believes the unique protective keratin scales (the same material as your fingernails) have curative properties. This has resulted in massive illegal taking of pangolins from the wild. With the four species of Asian pangolins becoming endangered, smugglers are now turning their attention to the four found in Africa, including this species.

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ANI062-00357

A vulnerable adult female white bellied pangolin (Phataginus tricuspis) with her baby, part of Pangolin Conservation, a non-profit organization in Saint Augustine, Florida. This juvenile is only 70 days old. She is the first of her species to be bred in captivity.

Frustratingly, traditional Chinese medicine falsely believes the unique protective keratin scales (the same material as your fingernails) have curative properties. This has resulted in massive illegal taking of pangolins from the wild. With the four species of Asian pangolins becoming endangered, smugglers are now turning their attention to the four found in Africa, including this species.

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ANI062-00358

A vulnerable adult female white bellied pangolin (Phataginus tricuspis) with her baby, part of Pangolin Conservation, a non-profit organization in Saint Augustine, Florida. This juvenile is only 70 days old. She is the first of her species to be bred in captivity.

Frustratingly, traditional Chinese medicine falsely believes the unique protective keratin scales (the same material as your fingernails) have curative properties. This has resulted in massive illegal taking of pangolins from the wild. With the four species of Asian pangolins becoming endangered, smugglers are now turning their attention to the four found in Africa, including this species.

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ANI062-00353

A vulnerable adult female white bellied pangolin (Phataginus tricuspis) with her baby, part of Pangolin Conservation, a non-profit organization in Saint Augustine, Florida. This juvenile is only 70 days old. She is the first of her species to be bred in captivity.

Frustratingly, traditional Chinese medicine falsely believes the unique protective keratin scales (the same material as your fingernails) have curative properties. This has resulted in massive illegal taking of pangolins from the wild. With the four species of Asian pangolins becoming endangered, smugglers are now turning their attention to the four found in Africa, including this species.

Photo

ANI062-00354

A vulnerable adult female white bellied pangolin (Phataginus tricuspis) with her baby, part of Pangolin Conservation, a non-profit organization in Saint Augustine, Florida. This juvenile is only 70 days old. She is the first of her species to be bred in captivity.

Frustratingly, traditional Chinese medicine falsely believes the unique protective keratin scales (the same material as your fingernails) have curative properties. This has resulted in massive illegal taking of pangolins from the wild. With the four species of Asian pangolins becoming endangered, smugglers are now turning their attention to the four found in Africa, including this species.

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ANI062-00355

A vulnerable adult female white bellied pangolin (Phataginus tricuspis) with her baby, part of Pangolin Conservation, a non-profit organization in Saint Augustine, Florida. This juvenile is only 70 days old. She is the first of her species to be bred in captivity.

Frustratingly, traditional Chinese medicine falsely believes the unique protective keratin scales (the same material as your fingernails) have curative properties. This has resulted in massive illegal taking of pangolins from the wild. With the four species of Asian pangolins becoming endangered, smugglers are now turning their attention to the four found in Africa, including this species.

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ANI027-00499

A St. Lucia lancehead (Bothrops carribeus) at Reptile Gardens.

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A sonoran whipsnake (Masticophis bilineatus) at Reptile Gardens.

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ANI027-00498

A Field’s viper (Pseudocerastes fieldi) at Reptile Gardens.

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ANI097-00172

Arizona black rattlesnake (Crotalus oreganus cerberus).

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ANI097-00054

The underside of a brown water python, Liasis fuscus, at the Wild Life Sydney Zoo.

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ONA007-00091

A staff member from the Cuc Phuong Turtle Conservation Center weighs a vulnerable Southeast Asiatic softshell (Amyda cartilaginea).

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ANI077-00439

A rhinoceros viper (Bitis gabonica rhinoceros) at Zoo Atlanta.

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ANI077-00440

A rhinoceros viper (Bitis gabonica rhinoceros) at Zoo Atlanta.

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ANI077-00441

A rhinoceros viper (Bitis gabonica rhinoceros) at Zoo Atlanta.

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ANI077-00442

A rhinoceros viper (Bitis gabonica rhinoceros) at Zoo Atlanta.

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ANI077-00443

A rhinoceros viper (Bitis gabonica rhinoceros) at Zoo Atlanta.

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ANI077-00379

An Amethystine scrub python (Morelia amethistina) sheds his skin at the Omaha Zoo.

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ANI077-00377

An Amethystine scrub python (Morelia amethistina) sheds his skin at the Omaha Zoo.

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ANI077-00378

An Amethystine scrub python (Morelia amethistina) sheds his skin at the Omaha Zoo.

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FIS011-00223

A studio portait of a largescale stoneroller (Campostoma oligolepis).

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A studio portait of a largescale stoneroller (Campostoma oligolepis).

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ANI073-00189

A studio portrait of a six-lined racerunner (Cnemidophorus sexlineata) from the Ozarks of southern Missouri.

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ANI073-00190

A studio portrait of a six-lined racerunner (Cnemidophorus sexlineata) from the Ozarks of southern Missouri.

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ANI073-00191

A studio portrait of a six-lined racerunner (Cnemidophorus sexlineata) from the Ozarks of southern Missouri.

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ANI073-00192

A studio portrait of a six-lined racerunner (Cnemidophorus sexlineata) from the Ozarks of southern Missouri.

Photo: Julie Jensen Director of Marketing | WVC O: 866.800.7326 | D: 702.443.9249 | E: j.jensen@wvc.org

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