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A studio portrait of a six-lined racerunner (Aspidoscelis sexilneatus sexlineatus) from the Ozarks of southern Missouri.

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ANI073-00193

A studio portrait of a six-lined racerunner (Aspidoscelis sexilneatus sexlineatus) from the Ozarks of southern Missouri.

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A wild caught orangethroat darter (Etheostoma spectabile) in Missouri.

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A wild caught orangethroat darter (Etheostoma spectabile) in Missouri.

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A wild caught orangethroat darter (Etheostoma spectabile) in Missouri.

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A wild caught orangethroat darter (Etheostoma spectabile) in Missouri.

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A wild caught orangethroat darter (Etheostoma spectabile) in Missouri.

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Fragmentation of fragile habitat has added to the woes of the once-hardy desert tortoise (Gopherus agassizi). They are collected from soon-to-be-developed lands and sent to a center where they are adopted, euthanized (if ill), or used for research.

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ANI082-00159

A western cottonmouth (Agkistrodon piscivorous) snake lies dead on the Clear Creek Levy Road, near Ware, Illinois. Road kills are one of the leading causes of death for snakes in the U.S.

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A western cottonmouth snake (Agkistrodon piscivorous) lies on the Snake Road, near Ware, Illinois. This three mile stretch of road along the is closed to traffic when the snakes are migrating from limestone cliffs to the swamp nearby.

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A rough green snake (Opheodrys aestivus) along Snake Road in Shawnee National forest in southwest Illinios.

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An eastern hognose snake (Heterodon platirhinos) plays dead on the Snake Road, a three-mile stretch of road in the Shawnee National Forest in southern Illinois. To prevent herp deaths, this section of road is closed in the spring and fall when snakes are migrating.

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ANI082-00164

An eastern hognose snake plays dead on the Snake Road, a three-mile stretch of road in the Shawnee National Forest in southern Illinois. To prevent herp deaths, this section of road is closed in the spring and fall when snakes are migrating.

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ANI082-00165

Snake wranglers from the 45th annual Mangum Rattlesnake Derby in Mangum, Oklahoma. This rattlesnake festival takes in between 1,500 and 2,000 pounds of western diamondback rattlesnakes (Crotalus atrox) each year.

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A western diamondback rattlesnake (Crotalus atrox) in the foothills of the Wichita Mountains in Oklahoma. Studies are showing that rattlesnakes that have the genetic tendency to migrate are being killed in ever-increasing numbers on our nation’s roads, leaving those snakes with non-migrating tendencies behind to breed.

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ANI082-00093

Bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) swimming in the Bighorn Creek, in the Wigwam River drainage in British Columbia. This is one of the last, best places for spawning of the vulnerable (ICUN) and federally-threatened bull trout, and is part of the Kootenay River system, which sees an annual migration of bull trout from Lake Koocanusa, some fifty miles away. The fish prefer very cold water of 40 degrees or so in order to spawn, and the springs in this area provide that.

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ANI082-00031

A western diamondback rattlesnake (Crotalus atrox) in the foothills of the Wichita Mountains in Oklahoma. Studies are showing that rattlesnakes that have the genetic tendency to migrate are being killed in ever-increasing numbers on our nation’s roads, leaving those snakes with non-migrating tendencies behind to breed.

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ANI082-00024

A western diamondback rattlesnake (Crotalus atrox) in the foothills of the Wichita Mountains in Oklahoma. Studies are showing that rattlesnakes that have the genetic tendency to migrate are being killed in ever-increasing numbers on our nation’s roads, leaving those snakes with non-migrating tendencies behind to breed.

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ANI082-00025

A western diamondback rattlesnake (Crotalus atrox) in the foothills of the Wichita Mountains in Oklahoma. Studies are showing that rattlesnakes that have the genetic tendency to migrate are being killed in ever-increasing numbers on our nation’s roads, leaving those snakes with non-migrating tendencies behind to breed.

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ANI082-00026

A western diamondback rattlesnake (Crotalus atrox) in the foothills of the Wichita Mountains in Oklahoma. Studies are showing that rattlesnakes that have the genetic tendency to migrate are being killed in ever-increasing numbers on our nation’s roads, leaving those snakes with non-migrating tendencies behind to breed.

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ANI082-00027

A western diamondback rattlesnake (Crotalus atrox) in the foothills of the Wichita Mountains in Oklahoma. Studies are showing that rattlesnakes that have the genetic tendency to migrate are being killed in ever-increasing numbers on our nation’s roads, leaving those snakes with non-migrating tendencies behind to breed.

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ANI082-00028

A western diamondback rattlesnake (Crotalus atrox) in the foothills of the Wichita Mountains in Oklahoma. Studies are showing that rattlesnakes that have the genetic tendency to migrate are being killed in ever-increasing numbers on our nation’s roads, leaving those snakes with non-migrating tendencies behind to breed.

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ANI082-00029

A western diamondback rattlesnake (Crotalus atrox) in the foothills of the Wichita Mountains in Oklahoma. Studies are showing that rattlesnakes that have the genetic tendency to migrate are being killed in ever-increasing numbers on our nation’s roads, leaving those snakes with non-migrating tendencies behind to breed.

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ANI082-00030

A western diamondback rattlesnake (Crotalus atrox) in the foothills of the Wichita Mountains in Oklahoma. Studies are showing that rattlesnakes that have the genetic tendency to migrate are being killed in ever-increasing numbers on our nation’s roads, leaving those snakes with non-migrating tendencies behind to breed.

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A sea turtle that was rescued from the deep water horizon oil spill being rehabilitated at the Audubon Nature Institute in New Orleans, Louisiana.

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A sea turtle that was rescued from the deep water horizon oil spill are being rehabilitated at the Audubon Nature Institute in New Orleans, Louisiana.

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Kathy Sartore goes fishing with her brother-in-law, Paul Sartore.

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A garter snake (Thamnophis sp.) near the Steamboat Trace trail between Nebraska City and Peru, Nebraska.

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A garter snake (Thamnophis sp.) near the Steamboat Trace trail between Nebraska City and Peru, Nebraska.

Photo: Julie Jensen Director of Marketing | WVC O: 866.800.7326 | D: 702.443.9249 | E: j.jensen@wvc.org

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