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Joel Sartore’s image of a Choctawhatchee beach mouse is featured on the cover of the February 25, 2011 issue of Science magazine.

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A scientist holds a captive frog at the breeding facility known as Balsa de los Sapos, or Amphibian Ark, at Quito’s Catholic University, Ecuador.

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A captive, endangered marsupial frog (Gastrotheca litonedis) at the captive breeding facility known as Balsa de los Sapos, or Amphibian Ark, at Quito’s Catholic University, Ecuador.

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Tadpoles are preserved in formulin for future study in Limon, Ecuador.

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A harlequin frog (Atelopus sp.) is swabbed for study at a research site near Limon, Ecuador.

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Tim Krynak holds up a specimen of a Ecuador cochran frog, Nymphargus griffithsi (IUCN: Vulnerable), a type of glass frog. Tim and his wife Kathy have been coming to this place near Mindo, Ecuador for several years to monitor amphibian life. The Krynaks and their team hope that chytrid fungus does not show up here, but know that many other parts of Ecuador have already seen catastrophic declines due to the fungus. “Every time we come back, if it’s quiet on that first night, we think, ‘oh no’. We’re scared. We think, this is it,” said Tim.

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A biologist from the Sutton Avian Research Center in Bartlesville, Oklahoma, handles a male prairie chicken.

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Wolf biologists in Yellowstone National Park examine a dead elk for signs of wolf predation.

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For fear she and her pack might harm cattle, Opal was captured and collared by USFWS workers. She was then released as a “Judas wolf” — once she lead the workers back to her pack, they were all exterminated. (Montana, outside of Yellowstone.)

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For fear she and her pack might harm cattle, Opal was captured and collared by USFWS workers. She was then released as a “Judas wolf” — once she lead the workers back to her pack, they were all exterminated. (Montana, outside of Yellowstone.)

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A worker uses binoculars to track wild gray wolves in Yellowstone National Park.

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Mike Phillips, former director of the Yellowstone wolf reintroduction program uses radio telemetry to track wild gray wolves recently released into the park.

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Volunteers give gray wolf pup its shots in an acclimation pen in Yellowstone National Park.

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Volunteers give gray wolf pup its shots in an acclimation pen in Yellowstone National Park.

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Volunteers give gray wolf pup its shots in an acclimation pen in Yellowstone National Park.

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For fear she and her pack might harm cattle, Opal was captured and collared by USFWS workers. She was then released as a “Judas wolf” — once she lead the workers back to her pack, they were all exterminated.

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For fear she and her pack might harm cattle, Opal was captured and collared by USFWS workers. She was then released as a “Judas wolf” — once she lead the workers back to her pack, they were all exterminated.

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For fear she and her pack might harm cattle, Opal was captured and collared by USFWS workers. She was then released as a “Judas wolf” — once she lead the workers back to her pack, they were all exterminated.

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Ellen Sartore at the Henry Doorly Zoo’s aquarium in Omaha, Nebraska.

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Taxidermy specimen of an ivory-billed woodpecker at the University of Nebraska State Museum.

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Taxidermy specimen of an ivory-billed woodpecker at the University of Nebraska State Museum.

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Taxidermy specimen of an ivory-billed woodpecker at the University of Nebraska State Museum.

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Taxidermy specimens of an ivory-billed woodpecker at the University of Nebraska State Museum.

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Taxidermy specimen of an ivory-billed woodpecker at the University of Nebraska State Museum.

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Taxidermy specimen of an ivory-billed woodpecker at the University of Nebraska State Museum.

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At the Sutton Avian Research Center, bald eagle eggs are hatched as part of the Southern Bald Eagle Restoration Program. This particular egg developed a small hole during incubation that workers mended with a special adhesive so that the chick could continue to develop and hatch.

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At the Sutton Avian Research Center, bald eagle eggs are hatched as part of the Southern Bald Eagle Restoration Program. This chick has bandages on his stomach to staunch bleeding where his stomach was connected to the inside of the egg.

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At the Sutton Avian Research Center, bald eagle eggs are hatched as part of the Southern Bald Eagle Restoration Program. This particular egg developed a small hole during incubation that workers mended with a special adhesive so that the chick could continue to develop and hatch.

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At the Sutton Avian Research Center, bald eagle eggs are hatched as part of the Southern Bald Eagle Restoration Program. This particular egg developed a small hole during incubation that workers mended with a special adhesive so that the chick could continue to develop and hatch.

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At the Sutton Avian Research Center, bald eagle eggs are hatched as part of the Southern Bald Eagle Restoration Program. This particular egg developed a small hole during incubation that workers mended with a special adhesive so that the chick could continue to develop.

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At the Sutton Avian Research Center, bald eagle eggs are hatched as part of the Southern Bald Eagle Restoration Program. This particular egg developed a small hole during incubation that workers mended with a special adhesive so that the chick could continue to develop.

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At the Sutton Avian Research Center, bald eagle eggs are hatched as part of the Southern Bald Eagle Restoration Program.

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A grizzly bear sits in a culvert trap and waits to be relocated. The bear and her cub were caught after prowling through neighborhoods near Whitefish, Montana.

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A grizzly bear sits in a culvert trap and waits to be relocated. The bear and her cub were caught after prowling through neighborhoods near Whitefish, Montana.

Photo: Julie Jensen Director of Marketing | WVC O: 866.800.7326 | D: 702.443.9249 | E: j.jensen@wvc.org

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