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PEO020-00136

A brown rat (Rattus norvegicus) trapped by a research team studying rodents for a movement tracking study in Queensland, Australia.

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INS021-00007

An entomologist scouts for El Segundo flower-loving fly (Rhaphiomidas terminatus terminatus). This insect was thought to be extinct since the end of the 1960s but a small remnant population of less than 100 individuals was discovered in the early 2000s.

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INS021-00009

An entomologist scouts for El Segundo flower-loving fly (Rhaphiomidas terminatus terminatus). This insect was thought to be extinct since the end of the 1960s but a small remnant population of less than 100 individuals was discovered in the early 2000s.

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INS021-00010

An entomologist scouts for El Segundo flower-loving fly (Rhaphiomidas terminatus terminatus). This insect was thought to be extinct since the end of the 1960s but a small remnant population of less than 100 individuals was discovered in the early 2000s.

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ESA001-00663

An entomologist searches for a federally endangered Delhi Sands flower-loving fly (Rhaphiomidas terminatus abdominalis). With fewer than 1,000 individuals left, this is the only fly to be federally listed.

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ESA001-00662

An entomologist carefully walks through the habitat of the federally endangered Delhi Sands flower-loving fly (Rhaphiomidas terminatus abdominalis). With fewer than 1,000 individuals left, this is the only fly to be federally listed.

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ESA001-00187

Red knot (Calidris canutus ssp. rufa), a candidate species for listing due to a rapid decline in population. The bird is dependent on one food during it’s northward migration: horseshoe crab eggs. Overfishing of the crabs has led a dramatic the decline of both knots and crabs. This bird was captured as part of a banding study by the Delaware Bay Shorebird Project.

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ESA001-00186

Red knot (Calidris canutus ssp. rufa), a candidate species for listing due to a rapid decline in population. The bird is dependent on one food during it’s northward migration: horseshoe crab eggs. Overfishing of the crabs has led a dramatic the decline of both knots and crabs. This bird was captured as part of a banding study by the Delaware Bay Shorebird Project.

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ANI082-00033

An endangered (IUCN and US) golden-cheeked warbler (Dendroica chrysoparia) caught in a mist net by scientists from the Nature Conservancy. Scientists net and band golden-cheeked warblers at Fort Hood in Killeen, Texas.

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ANI082-00034

An endangered (IUCN and US) golden-cheeked warbler (Dendroica chrysoparia) caught in a mist net by scientists from the Nature Conservancy. Scientists net and band golden-cheeked warblers at Fort Hood in Killeen, Texas.

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A scientist shows the deep freeze in his lab, which contains the DNA of all the frogs in their collection, a kind of frozen ark.

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A scientist shows the deep freeze in his lab, which contains the DNA of all the frogs in their collection, a kind of frozen ark.

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A scientist examines and feeds captive frogs at the captive breeding facility known as Balsa de los Sapos, or Amphibian Ark, at Quito’s Catholic University, Ecuador.

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Scientists examine and feed frogs at the captive breeding facility known as Balsa de los Sapos, or Amphibian Ark, at Quito’s Catholic University, Ecuador.

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A scientist holds an endangered San Lucas marsupial frog (Gastrotheca pseustes) at the captive breeding facility known as Balsa de los Sapos, or Amphibian Ark, at Quito’s Catholic University, Ecuador.

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SCE049-00022

A scientist holds a Mount Lyell salamander (Hydromantes platycephalus) in the Sixty Lake Basin of King’s Canyon National Park, Nevada.

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A biologist working for the National Parks Service holds an introduced (non-native) trout at the Sixty Lake Basin of King’s Canyon National Park, Nevada.

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A biologist working for the National Parks Service pulls up a catch of introduced (non-native) trout at the Sixty Lake Basin of King’s Canyon National Park, Nevada.

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A biologist working for the National Parks Service holds an introduced (non-native) trout at the Sixty Lake Basin of King’s Canyon National Park, Nevada.

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A biologist working for the National Parks Service collects introduced (non-native) trout at the Sixty Lake Basin of King’s Canyon National Park, Nevada.

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A biologist working for the National Parks Service collects introduced (non-native) trout at the Sixty Lake Basin of King’s Canyon National Park, Nevada.

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A biologist working for the National Parks Service holds an introduced (non-native) trout at the Sixty Lake Basin of King’s Canyon National Park, Nevada.

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A scientist swabs a Mount Lyell salamander (Hydromantes platycephalus) to test for chytrid fungus in the Sixty Lake Basin of King’s Canyon National Park, Nevada.

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A scientist swabs a Mount Lyell salamander (Hydromantes platycephalus) to test for chytrid fungus in the Sixty Lake Basin of King’s Canyon National Park, Nevada.

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A scientist holds a Mount Lyell salamander (Hydromantes platycephalus) in the Sixty Lake Basin of King’s Canyon National Park, Nevada.

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A biologist scales rocks in King’s Canyon National Park’s Sixty Lake Basin, Nevada.

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A biologist working for the National Parks Service holds an introduced (non-native) trout at the Sixty Lake Basin of King’s Canyon National Park, Nevada.

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A biologist at the amphibian lab of Pontificia Universidad Catolica del Ecuador in Quito.

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Three scientists examine the previous evening’s collection of amphibians in their hotel room in Limon, Ecuador.

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Two scientists examine a ravine demolished by a road-widening/gravel mining project in Ecuador. The spot was once prime amphibian habitat.

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A researcher holds a male harlequin frog (Atelopus sp.) collected for captive breeding near Limon, Ecuador.

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A harlequin frog (Atelopus sp.) is swabbed for study at a research site near Limon, Ecuador.

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SCE048-00053

A biologist at the amphibian lab of Pontificia Universidad Catolica del Ecuador in Quito.

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ANI079-00228

Dr. Gail Hearn walks through the jungle of Bioko island, Equatorial Guinea.

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ANI079-00202

A man carries a box of equipment at the Moraka Playa on Bioko Island.

Photo: Julie Jensen Director of Marketing | WVC O: 866.800.7326 | D: 702.443.9249 | E: j.jensen@wvc.org

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