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Biologists work in the pouring rain, searching for a rare fish, the smoky madtom (Noturus baileyi) ( IUCN: Critically endangered, US: Endangered) in Abrams Creek, TN.

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A writer and a researcher organize extinct frog specimens at the breeding facility known as Balsa de los Sapos, or Amphibian Ark, at Quito’s Catholic University, Ecuador.

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A scientist holds a captive frog at the breeding facility known as Balsa de los Sapos, or Amphibian Ark, at Quito’s Catholic University, Ecuador.

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A scientist holds a captive frog at the breeding facility known as Balsa de los Sapos, or Amphibian Ark, at Quito’s Catholic University, Ecuador.

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Scientists examine frogs at the captive breeding facility known as Balsa de los Sapos, or Amphibian Ark, at Quito’s Catholic University, Ecuador.

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A biologist working for the National Parks Service holds an introduced (non-native) trout at the Sixty Lake Basin of King’s Canyon National Park, Nevada.

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Biologists in King’s Canyon National Park’s Sixty Lake Basin, Nevada.

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A biologist scales rocks in King’s Canyon National Park’s Sixty Lake Basin, Nevada.

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Biologists in King’s Canyon National Park’s Sixty Lake Basin, Nevada.

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Tadpoles are preserved in formulin for future study in Limon, Ecuador.

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A biologist searches for amphibians in a cloud forest reserve near Mindo, Ecuador.

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Scientists at the Toolik Research Center study the effects of global warming on the tundra. If the permafrost melts, the amount of carbon released into the air could make man-madeemissions look trivial, the scientists said. Shown are botanists studying a thermokarst in which the permafrost has melted away

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Scientists at the Toolik Research Center study the effects of global warming on the tundra. If the permafrost melts, the amount of carbon released into the air could make man-madeemissions look trivial, the scientists said. Shown are botanists studying tundra plants by the square meter.

Photo: Julie Jensen Director of Marketing | WVC O: 866.800.7326 | D: 702.443.9249 | E: j.jensen@wvc.org

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