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Silhouette of a cruise ship at sunset near San Cristobal Island in the Galapagos.

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Tourists along the bow of a cruise boat in the Antarctic Peninsula.

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The National Geographic Endeavor, a Lindblad ship, whose zodiaks ferry guests to and from shore.

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The National Geographic Endeavor, a Lindblad ship, whose zodiaks ferry guests to and from shore.

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Zodiaks from the National Geographic Endeavor come and go along the coast of Espanola Island in Galapagos National Park.

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The National Geographic Endeavor, a Lindblad ship, whose zodiaks ferry guests to and from shore.

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Tourist walk along the beach along Puerto Egas, Santiago Island in Galapagos National Park.

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Brown pelicans (Pelecanus occidentalis) and a Galapagos sea lion (Zalophus wollebaeki) roam the coast of Puerto Ayora, Santa Cruz Island, on the edge of Galapagos National Park.

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A teenage girl wades in the water close to Urbina Bay, Isabela Island in Galapagos National Park.

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Zodiac boats depart from a cruise ship near Isabela Island in Galapagos National Park.

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A mother and daughter take a picture of themselves as they cross the Equator, near Isabella Island in Galapagos National Park.

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A tanker moves down a channel which bisects Sabine NWR in Louisiana. Part of this reserve has a system of gates, which can be closed in case an oil spill occurs .

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A Louisiana-built oil drilling and production platform is carried by a Barge toward the Gulf of Mexico.

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On board a PHI helicopter/media flight covering the deep water horizon oil spill at the spill site, two types of burning are now going on. The big black column of smoke is from oil being burned after being skimmed up with ships towing booms. The second kind of burning is coming in the forms of big flares at the actual relief well drilling site itself. A new rig has been brought in to directly burn off whatever it can pull off the tophat, which some have estimated at a million gallons a day.

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On board a PHI helicopter/media flight covering the deep water horizon oil spill at the spill site, two types of burning are now going on. The big black column of smoke is from oil being burned after being skimmed up with ships towing booms. The second kind of burning is coming in the forms of big flares at the actual relief well drilling site itself. A new rig has been brought in to directly burn off whatever it can pull off the tophat, which some have estimated at a million gallons a day.

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On board a PHI helicopter/media flight covering the deep water horizon oil spill at the spill site, two types of burning are now going on. The big black column of smoke is from oil being burned after being skimmed up with ships towing booms. The second kind of burning is coming in the forms of big flares at the actual relief well drilling site itself. A new rig has been brought in to directly burn off whatever it can pull off the tophat, which some have estimated at a million gallons a day.

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An aerial of an watercraft cutting through the surface oil near the deep water horizon spill site in the Gulf of Mexico.

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An aerial of watercraft cutting through the surface oil near the deep water horizon spill site in the Gulf of Mexico.

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A clean up crew hired by BP tries to sop oil from the Deepwater Horizon spill, along the shoreline on Queen Bess island in Barataria Bay, Louisiana.

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Burning surface oil not far from the Deepwater Horizon spill site creates huge black columns of smoke in the Gulf of Mexico.

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Boats burning off surface oil not near the Deepwater Horizon spill site creating huge black columns of smoke in the Gulf of Mexico.

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This aerial shows two types of burn-offs used on the Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico. The big black column of smoke is from oil being burned after being skimmed up with ships towing booms. The second kind of burning is coming in the forms of big flares at the actual relief well drilling site itself. A new rig has been brought in to directly burn off whatever it can pull off the tophat, which some have estimated at a million gallons a day.

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This aerial shows two types of burn-offs used on the Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico. The big black column of smoke is from oil being burned after being skimmed up with ships towing booms. The second kind of burning is coming in the forms of big flares at the actual relief well drilling site itself. A new rig has been brought in to directly burn off whatever it can pull off the tophat, which some have estimated at a million gallons a day.

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Shrimp boats sit idle at the Myrtle Grove marina in Belle Chasse, Louisiana. The economic impact of the Deepwater Horizon spill will be felt for years to come.

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A former shrimping boat now trawls for oil from the Deepwater Horizon spill in Barataria Bay, Louisiana.

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Hundreds of pipeline canals and shipping lanes have been cut into the coastal marshes of Louisiana. Each one allows more saltwater to intrude from the Gulf, killing the marsh and allowing more oil to penetrate from the Deepwater Horizon spill.

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Aerial of the marshlands that have literally been cut to pieces by pipeline canals and shipping channels that have been put in by the oil industry over the years. Such huge canals have allowed saltwater to intrude, killing off the marsh and eliminating its resistance to catastrophic events in the Gulf such as storms, and now, oil spills like the Deepwater Horizon.

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A boat pulls booms over the water in Barataria Bay, Louisiana, cleaning up oil from the Deepwater Horizon Spill.

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Joel Sartore, on assignment for National Geographic magazine, while photographing the Deepwater Horizon oil spill in Barataria Bay, Louisiana.

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Boats burn off surface oil not far from the Deepwater Horizon spill site, creating huge black columns of smoke in the Gulf of Mexico.

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A king penguin (Aptenodytes patagonicus) rookery of up to 200,000 birds on South Georgia Island, Antarctica. The National Geographic Endeavor in the background.

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A king penguin (Aptenodytes patagonicus) rookery of up to 200,000 birds on South Georgia Island, Antarctica. The National Geographic Endeavor in the background.

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A king penguin (Aptenodytes patagonicus) rookery of up to 200,000 birds on South Georgia Island, Antarctica. The National Geographic Endeavor in the background.

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The National Geographic Endeavor near Danco Island, Antarctica.

Photo: Julie Jensen Director of Marketing | WVC O: 866.800.7326 | D: 702.443.9249 | E: j.jensen@wvc.org

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