Dear Friends: We are still open for business, but it might take longer to fill your orders and requests as we have shifted to minimal staffing as a precaution against COVID-19. We appreciate your patience.

Photo

ANI075-00263

A very ill, critically endangered (IUCN) and federally endangered Hawksbill sea turtle (Eretmochelys imbricata) at the Australia Zoo Wildlife Hospital.

Photo

INV002-00314

Appalachian brook crayfish, Cambarus bartonii cavatus, at the Crayfish lab in West Liberty University in West Liberty, WV.

This specimen is from Ohio.

The black on this animal is manganese that has encrusted all over its body. Manganese is a pollutant from coal mining runoff in rivers and streams. Crayfish and mussels are often killed by the toxic sediments that cover the bottoms of rivers downstream from coal mines. Stream sedimentation is the number one cause of crayfish imperilment, and crayfish are the fourth most imperiled animal group on the planet.

Photo

INV002-00313

Appalachian brook crayfish, Cambarus bartonii cavatus, at the Crayfish lab in West Liberty University in West Liberty, WV.

This specimen is from Ohio.

The black on this animal is manganese that has encrusted all over its body. Manganese is a pollutant from coal mining runoff in rivers and streams. Crayfish and mussels are often killed by the toxic sediments that cover the bottoms of rivers downstream from coal mines. Stream sedimentation is the number one cause of crayfish imperilment, and crayfish are the fourth most imperiled animal group on the planet.

Photo

INV002-00312

Appalachian brook crayfish, Cambarus bartonii cavatus, at the Crayfish lab in West Liberty University in West Liberty, WV.

This specimen is from Ohio.

The black on this animal is manganese that has encrusted all over its body. Manganese is a pollutant from coal mining runoff in rivers and streams. Crayfish and mussels are often killed by the toxic sediments that cover the bottoms of rivers downstream from coal mines. Stream sedimentation is the number one cause of crayfish imperilment, and crayfish are the fourth most imperiled animal group on the planet.

Photo

INV002-00311

Appalachian brook crayfish, Cambarus bartonii cavatus, at the Crayfish lab in West Liberty University in West Liberty, WV.

This specimen is from Ohio.

The black on this animal is manganese that has encrusted all over its body. Manganese is a pollutant from coal mining runoff in rivers and streams. Crayfish and mussels are often killed by the toxic sediments that cover the bottoms of rivers downstream from coal mines. Stream sedimentation is the number one cause of crayfish imperilment, and crayfish are the fourth most imperiled animal group on the planet.

Photo

ANI088-00026

A rescue volunteer pulls a sick koala down out of a tree and into a transport blanket.

Photo

PEO020-00137

A sick Australian pied cormorant (Phalacrocorax varius) is treated at the Australia Zoo in Queensland, Australia.

Photo

PEO020-00138

A broken wing is treated by a veterinarian at the Australia Zoo in Queensland, Australia.

Photo

ANI075-00261

A very ill, critically endangered (IUCN) and federally endangered Hawksbill sea turtle (Eretmochelys imbricata) at the Australia Zoo Wildlife Hospital.

Photo

ANI075-00262

A very ill, critically endangered (IUCN) and federally endangered Hawksbill sea turtle (Eretmochelys imbricata) at the Australia Zoo Wildlife Hospital.

Photo

ANI075-00245

A very ill, critically endangered (IUCN) and federally endangered Hawksbill sea turtle (Eretmochelys imbricata) at the Australia Zoo Wildlife Hospital.

Photo

ANI075-00246

A very ill, critically endangered (IUCN) and federally endangered Hawksbill sea turtle (Eretmochelys imbricata) at the Australia Zoo Wildlife Hospital.

Photo

ANI075-00247

A very ill, critically endangered (IUCN) and federally endangered Hawksbill sea turtle (Eretmochelys imbricata) at the Australia Zoo Wildlife Hospital.

Photo

PEO025-00064

A woman uses a nebulizer on her son who was having trouble breathing at their home in Lincoln, Nebraska.

Photo

PEO025-00063

A woman uses a nebulizer on her son who was having trouble breathing at their home in Lincoln, Nebraska.

Photo

PEO004-00303

Kathy Sartore wears a wig (shown on a mannequin head here) to cover up hair loss from chemotherapy for breast cancer. (Lincoln, NE.)

Photo

PEO004-00301

Kathy Sartore, sick from chemotherapy for breast cancer, retreats into her room. (Lincoln, NE.)

Photo

PEO004-00302

Kathy Sartore, sick from chemotherapy for breast cancer, retreats into her room. (Lincoln, NE.)

Photo

PEO004-00300

Kathy Sartore, sick from chemotherapy for breast cancer, retreats into her room. (Lincoln, NE.)

Photo

PEO004-00298

Kathy Sartore, sick from chemotherapy for breast cancer, retreats into her room. (Lincoln, NE.)

Photo

PEO004-00299

Kathy Sartore, sick from chemotherapy for breast cancer, retreats into her room where she’s visited by her two year-old son. (Lincoln, NE.)

Photo

PEO004-00297

Kathy Sartore, sick from chemotherapy for breast cancer, retreats into her room. (Lincoln, NE.)

Photo

PEO004-00295

Kathy Sartore, sick from chemotherapy for breast cancer, retreats into her room. (Lincoln, NE.)

Photo

PEO004-00296

Kathy Sartore, sick from chemotherapy for breast cancer, retreats into her room. (Lincoln, NE.)

Photo

PEO004-00294

Kathy Sartore, sick from chemotherapy for breast cancer, retreats into her room. (Lincoln, NE.)

Photo

ONA001-00009

Joel Sartore in a tree blind in Madidi. One of his guides lies on the floor, sick with an infection.

Photo: Julie Jensen Director of Marketing | WVC O: 866.800.7326 | D: 702.443.9249 | E: j.jensen@wvc.org

Speaking Engagements

Joel is a popular keynote speaker with conservation, corporate, and civic groups.

Hire him to entertain and inspire your audience.

Book Joel To Speak

The Photo Ark

Joel is the founder of the Photo Ark, a groundbreaking effort to document every species in captivity before it’s too late.

Explore the Photo Ark

Visit Our Store

Every purchase goes directly to support our mission: getting the public to care and helping to save species from extinction.

Help Us Build the Ark